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Thread: Hip Hiker

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Hip Hiker

    Can anyone help me find an isolating exercise to work specifically on this muscle? My research shows that it is innervated T12-L1.

    Quadratus lumborum muscle

    The quadratus lumborum is a well known muscle that is a primary cause of lower back pain. Its action of bringing the hip up is important for balancing postural distortion. Not only does it refer into the Sacro-Iliac joint, but can cause stress in that joint by pulling the hips out of alignment.
    Eric Texley

  2. #2
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    ...

    Can anyone help me understand this exercise?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Citation

    Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes monitored the electromyographic activity of quadratus lumborum in four young adults. A wide variety of tasks were performed including flexion tasks, lateral bending, twisting, extension, and lifting tasks. Heavy lifts of barbell weights up to 70 kg activated the quadratus lumborum 74% of their maximum on average while surface recording of erector spinae (L(3)) were only 62% of their maximum activation. The quadratus lumborum was more active (54%) than other muscles during isometric side support postures where the body is held horizontally almost parallel to the floor as the subjects supported themselves on one elbow on the floor together with both feet. Furthermore, it increased activation in response to increasing compression in static upright standing postures. RELEVANCE:--Electromyographic evidence, together with architectural features make the quadratus lumborum a better stabilizer of the spine than psoas. Use of horizontal 'side support' exercise to train this muscle would appear to be a wise choice.
    Eric Texley

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by etexley
    Can anyone help me understand this exercise?

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Citation

    Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes monitored the electromyographic activity of quadratus lumborum in four young adults. A wide variety of tasks were performed including flexion tasks, lateral bending, twisting, extension, and lifting tasks. Heavy lifts of barbell weights up to 70 kg activated the quadratus lumborum 74% of their maximum on average while surface recording of erector spinae (L(3)) were only 62% of their maximum activation. The quadratus lumborum was more active (54%) than other muscles during isometric side support postures where the body is held horizontally almost parallel to the floor as the subjects supported themselves on one elbow on the floor together with both feet. Furthermore, it increased activation in response to increasing compression in static upright standing postures. RELEVANCE:--Electromyographic evidence, together with architectural features make the quadratus lumborum a better stabilizer of the spine than psoas. Use of horizontal 'side support' exercise to train this muscle would appear to be a wise choice.

    I'm going to run that one by my therapist - I'll see him tomorrow evening (1/2/07). Sounds like something I may all ready be working on. He has me lean up against the wall with one of those execise balls and swivel my hip upward while I try to balance. Atrophy of muscles on one side of my torso necessitate developing other muscles to compensate for what is effectively the lengthening of one leg relative to the other.
    I'll see if he can shed light on matter.

  4. #4
    Check the illuistrated exercises on this site -

    http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/...-exercises.htm

    I think the "side plank" is the exercise described in the article originally referred to. This is something perscribed by my therapist.

  5. #5
    Spoke to my therapist last night when I went for session.
    He refers to that muscle group as the "QL". It's the primary focus of the exercises I do now. Have to keep working my left QL in order to keep a balance between left/right side. I don't know the level of stimulation on the left side but I do know that the muscles are weaker there so my torso is sort of dragged down on the left. My right side is pulled up by stronger muscles.
    This has to be counteracted in order to prevent future distortion of spine and further problems.

    For what it's worth. I'm going to do a short summary of what I've learned in my context of Brown-Squard syndrome and what exercises I follow to maintain and improve my strength and gait. I hope it helps some one else out here with similar challenges.

  6. #6
    Regarding the 'side plank' exercise, first try it in a knee supported position to avoid too much stress on your joints in this side loaded position. The exercise is the same, except you begin with your knees bent so that when you lift up your hips your weight is distributed between your knees and elbow. The best illustration of this exercise I found came from a pregnancy website:
    http://babyfit.sparkpeople.com/pregn...=277&extype=pp

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by garvey
    Spoke to my therapist last night when I went for session.
    He refers to that muscle group as the "QL". It's the primary focus of the exercises I do now. Have to keep working my left QL in order to keep a balance between left/right side. I don't know the level of stimulation on the left side but I do know that the muscles are weaker there so my torso is sort of dragged down on the left. My right side is pulled up by stronger muscles.
    This has to be counteracted in order to prevent future distortion of spine and further problems.

    For what it's worth. I'm going to do a short summary of what I've learned in my context of Brown-Squard syndrome and what exercises I follow to maintain and improve my strength and gait. I hope it helps some one else out here with similar challenges.
    All ears....this has been a very difficult area to work for me. We have been doing a lot of pilate's type exercises to help this area. Love to see what you have come up with.....John

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