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Thread: anyone know what these #'s mean on the mobo?

  1. #1
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    anyone know what these #'s mean on the mobo?

    Hello everyone, I was wondering if anyone knew what these numbers were on the bottom right hand corner of my motherboard. For the longest time they were stuck at 2.0 and now suddenly its 2.1 after leaving the computer online over night. Just made me curious what its monitoring.

    Thanks.

    PS: after taking this picture I went out and bought duster hah.

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  2. #2
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    Wow...DUSTY! And you wonder why it's hot

    Edit*** Wonders are abound when you ask google.
    Last edited by Patonb; 01-01-2007 at 03:10 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    I thought the dust makes it faster. There was actually a spider web in there camping out, enjoying the view. Weee! ty
    Last edited by mr_coffee; 01-01-2007 at 03:14 PM.
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  4. #4
    Suspended Andy's Avatar
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    Jesus! Stock CPU cooler on a P4 caked in dust...you have your heat answer right there!

  5. #5
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    hah yes i am ashamed. I found one of my fans arn't working up to speed and the 3 inches of dust wasn't helping So after I get a new fan I think my processor will be saved!
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  6. #6
    Hi Mr_Coffee,

    You shouldn't have a decimal point in the LED POST Code Display after your POST is completed. The decimal point lights up when executing the AC2003 POST action and should disappear after the POST (Power On Self Test) is successfully completed. So something isn't right. You can find all the POST codes HERE for your ABit model AA8XE or in the below linked PDF user manual in Appendix A which is located at the bottom of the PDF file. Scroll WAY down.

    When you first turn your computer on, look at the LED POST Code Display and it should run through a bunch of numbers or POST tests.

    The LED POST Code 21 is evidently for "notebook or laptop" platforms, not for desktops. I don't see a POST Code 2.1 in your users manual in Appendix A.

    You can download the PDF file users manual for your ABit AA8XE motherboard HERE.

    POST Code Display
    This is an LED device to display the “POST” Code, the acronym of Power On Self Test. The computer will execute the POST action whenever you power on the computer. The POST process is controlled by the BIOS. It is used to detect the status of the computer’s main components and peripherals. Each POST Code corresponds to different checkpoints that are also defined by the BIOS in advance. For example, “memory presence test” is an important checkpoint and its POST Code is “C1”. When the BIOS execute any POST item, it will write the corresponding POST Code into the address 80h. If the POST passes, the BIOS will process the next POST item and write the next POST Code into the address 80h. If the POST fails, we can check the POST Code in address 80h to find out where the problem lies.
    This LED device also displays the “POST” Code of AC2003, an “uGuru” chipset developed exclusively by ABIT computer.

    NOTE: The decimal point lights up when executing the AC2003 POST action.

    See Appendix for both AWARD and AC2003 POST Code definition.
    But in general, all codes beginning with 0 = power up sequence, 9 = power down sequence, C = memory, and 2 = VGA/CMOS settings load. The codes are in the appendix of your ABit user manual.

    Any problems? Reset CMOS. If it begins with 0, and does not change after CMOS clear, reseat CPU, PSU. C = reseat memory, 2 = reseat video Card.

    POST Code 21
    HPM initialization (notebook platform)

    1. Check validity of RTC value: e.g. a value of 5Ah is an invalid value for RTC minute.
    Are you sure the 2.0 or 20 wasn't really reading 2D? Your 2D POST Code is:

    2D
    1. Initialize double-byte language font (Optional)
    2. Put information on screen display, including Award title, CPU type, CPU speed, full screen logo.
    A dustbuster isn't going to clean the fins on your CPU's heatsink and fan (HSF). A can of compressed air would help but it's easy enough to remove so you can wash it properly in the kitchen sink with detergent and isopropyl alcohol as I described before. The HSF comes off very easily by just turning those four black plastic thumbscrew/fasteners COUNTER CLOCKWISE. There is a pictoral tutorial about it in Chapter 2-2 called "Install CPU, Heatsink and Fan Assembly" in the PDF users manual. I don't know how the fan comes off the heatsink but if you look at it I'm sure you can figure it out. Clean the fan while it's apart from the heatsink as I described earlier.

    But you'll need some new thermal compound to put the HSF back onto the CPU as I descibed earlier and posted a link about.

    And don't forget about cleaning the front bezel (cover) grill or air intakes if you plan on putting the side panel(s) back on. And that all your case fans are clean and running up to speed.

    Do you have the µGuru monitoring and overclocking software installed so you can see how your fans, voltages and temperatures are faring? It should look like this:



    µGuru is a new microprocessor designed by the ABIT Engineers for use only on ABIT motherboards. µGuru combines the ABIT Engineered features ABIT EQ, ABIT FanEQ, ABIT OC Guru, ABIT FlashMenu, ABIT AudioEQ and ABIT BlackBox into a user-friendly interface providing users the perfect environment with which to maximize performance and stability.
    Read more about it here.

    If you DON'T have it installed you can download it HERE. It's called the uGuru v 2.1.2.6 for AA8XE.

    Released Date: 2005-04-25
    File Size: 5 MB
    Description:
    ABIT µGuru v2.1.2.6
    For Microsoft Windows 2000/XP
    Then go up the list and patch it so it's up to date. This one:

    Released Date: 2005-09-29
    File Size: 2 MB
    Description:
    If you have installed μGuru utility already, please download this version.

    - Revision v1.38
    - For Microsoft Windows 9x / Me / 2000 / XP

    Support list:
    μGuru 1.00 ~ 1.24 (AI7, KV8-MAX3, AN7)
    μGuru 2.0.0.0 ~ 2.0.4.2 (KV8-PRO)
    μGuru 2.1.0.0 ~ 2.1.2.8 (AS8, AV8, AA8, AG8, AA8XE, AX8)
    Perhaps by resetting your CMOS by reconfiguring the "jumpers" on your motherboard temporarily (1 minute) you can fix the LED POST Code Display.

    BUT BE CAREFUL WHENEVER YOU SCREW AROUND WITH FLASHING THE BIOS OR RESETTING THE CMOS JUMPERS AS IT CAN LEAVE YOUR COMPUTER USELESS IF DONE WRONG. But by using the Windows-based ABIT FlashMenu you shouldn't have any problems, but ya never know. Read the PDF user manual to learn how.

    If it's running okay (you can benchmark it with 3DMark06 to determine this) just clean up the HSF as I described earlier and replace it after cleaning the HSF and CPU as I described earlier using some good thermal compound.

    Or just use compressed air if you're afraid you might screw something up. Maybe it's better to be safe than sorry if your CPU temperature is within a decent range say.... 36*C to 55*C. You don't want it to go over 65*C.

    And be careful if you decide to try overclocking your computer with the µGuru utility. Or manually in the BIOS. The stock HSF even when clean and running at it's best won't allow for very much OC'ing. At least "stable" OC'ing. Leave the OC'ing to the geeks or go to OverClockingForums.com and learn about it.

    Good luck Mr_Coffee.
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

  7. #7
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    Thanks bob,

    I think you leave the most detailed posts they come in handy

    In a few i'll attempt to clean the fan like you said right now the compressed air seemed to clean it out pretty well.

    If you look at the screen shot above Its 2.1. but now its back to normal, 2.0. The dots arn't a decimal, I just typed it wrong, sorry!

    I'll take a gander at that PDf as well! thanks again!
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  8. #8
    Hi Mr_Coffee,

    1- Do you have the uGuru (OC, temperature, voltage and fan speed) utility installed so you can monitor your CPU temperature?

    2- If so, what temps are you getting at idle and what temps while playing your favorite or CPU demanding game? Or benchmark stress testing program?

    When the Intel 560 3.6GHz series processors came out Alienware was getting a lot of overheating complaints about them. Many people shipped their computers back only to have them returned in the same condition. Duh.

    So Intel, in their later series, as they got past the 3.0GHz threshold, were no doubt coming up against heat problems.

    An independent tech group did a test on them as they (the 3.6GHz 560 series) were the first Intel processors to have the built-in throttling down to 1.5GHz when the processor started getting hot. Intel was under pressure to compete with AMD and were hitting the heat wall with their current technology. The same is happening to even a worse degree as they've cancelled the 4.0GHz processor that was planned to hit the market and prudently they went back to the drawing board.

    This tech group had a video out showing how they performed the tests and showed the 560 throttling down to the 1.5GHz speed under normal gaming stress. The only answer they could come up with was to use Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound instead of the crappy, easy for Intel to factory install, black thermal tape. The use of the better heat conducting Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound really reduced the heat problem. It was their only answer (or work-around/Band-Aid approach) to Intel's problem. They showed the before and after heat measurements and they weren't associated with the Arctic Silver company whatsoever. I use the silicone stuff that I bought from Radio Shack (it only came in a 2 pack... I'll have this damn stuff forever!!) but my model processors don't have any exaggerated heat problems.

    We at the Alienware forums posted the video link to the moderators at the Alienware tech support forum and suggested they try the "solution" to the overheating problem. Whether or not they did I don't know... they wouldn't admit that there was a problem with the processor when obviously there was. They didn't want to admit to any liability since they're an agent for Intel and are responsible. It would have cost them and/or Intel a lot of money to replace all those processors!

    So if you can't get your 3.4GHz processor to run at normal temp specs.... 36-40*C at idle and under 65*C under stress then I would recommend that you buy some Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound and apply that per directions. That is a very thin film of it between the heatsink and processor.... making sure that it's evenly or flatly mated together, the heatsink onto the processor.

    If I had your computer here and access to the Internet (it's tough/dangerous to work on a computer when you can't get online to troubleshoot etc.!!) I would clean it up properly, reseat your HSF and processor with Arctic Silver 5, clear your CMOS and update the BIOS to the latest version and get in there and start messing around with the settings. After further familiarizing myself with your AA8XE motherboard at the various ABit forums that pepper the Internet and thoroughly reading the user manual.

    BIOS Version: 2.6
    Released Date: 2006-06-08
    File Size: 352 KB
    Download Time (56K): 51.5 sec
    Description:
    Enhanced compatibility with certain memories.
    BIOS compiled date: 06/08/2006
    It's a new BIOS update, just 7 months old for your 3 year old motherboard so may have some fixes and advantages to it. Ya never know. Sometimes you need to go back to an older version. Especially if you haven't freshly formatted and clean installed XP and installed the latest motherboard drivers and may have some problems such as hidden viruses and malware or bad sectors on your active hard drive etc. But I enjoy messing around with computers as long as I have another working one here and Internet access.

    But if your computer is running okay and you haven't messed around with flashing BIOS' or troubleshooting stuff in the past then I wouldn't advise bothering with it. The "If it ain't broke, don't fix it theory".

    Bob.
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle." - Philo of Alexandria

  9. #9
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    Don't forget.. He's running Mandrive, or is it Unbutu

  10. #10
    Senior Member mr_coffee's Avatar
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    Paton, I run Mandriva on 1 harddrive and windows xp on the other so I can still play games!

    Bob, I downloaded that program and updated but I can't find any thing that shows my temp just fan speed.

    The choices i have are:
    OC guru
    Guru Clock
    Flash Menu
    Abit EQ
    Black Box

    They all open up except the Guru Clock when i click on it, it seems to load and yet nothing is displayed not even on the task menu, i also checked my running processes and I can't seem to find it running in the background (the Guru clock)

    Any ideas what program I should run to view the temp?

    WHoops n/m i found it!


    Here is a screenshot of what everyting is without running my game but the system has been on for a day:


    Ill get naother screen shot in a bit after play a match of Company of Heros
    Injured:10-16-04
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