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Thread: Highlights and (My Reasons for) Hope from 2006

  1. #41
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kate
    Happy birthday and thank you for another year of progress. All I have to do is imagine what it would be like if there were no CC, no Keck Center, no ChinaSCINet, no Dr. Young . . . and I remember what despair feels like. Your fans in the Pacific Northwest are sending you love and good energy!

    kate

    ps--also, one of these days, you're going to get a copy of my book in the mail, too.
    what about no DA?

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by jenlongdon
    Dr. Young, I woke up this morning paralyzed and hopeless. It doesn't happen often but when it does... I had a tradition of hiking Camelback Mountain every New Year's morning. The rest of the group went and thought of me at the top but it's not the same.

    I hold out hope that I will climb that mountain again. The deal is I'll get myself up, they have to get me down. LOL.

    When you first posted this message, I printed it and keep it close, I emailed it to every SCI and every advocate that I know. NOW is the time to work harder than ever.

    You gave me the hope that I need to keep going. I'm ready to fight on. More letters, more fundraisers, more research studies. Thank you.
    Jen -- I echo your sentiments. I too printed up Dr. Young's notes sent it to every SCI I know and all of my friends and family to spread the optimism and deep feelings of gratitude that I have.

    John Smith wrote to me a few days ago, and I believe summed up my family and I feelings perfectly ..."Dr. Young, as usual, gave us the stiff drink of hope we needed."

    Thanks for the stiff drink Dr. Young.

    I also have been noticing a change in the way people view science and research pertaining to a cure -- especially receiving letters and greetings around the holidaze... I received a car just yesterday that said "we believe that medical breakthroughs are coming" and this was from a family that has very little understanding of science or research.

    Between Dr. Young's words and my belief in the collective unconscious -- I'm excited to about this new year.!!!

    happy new year everyone

  3. #43
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    Smile Thank you

    Dr Young -- While I don't log in very often, I check the site frequently and the best news is to see that you have posted. Thank you so much for all you do to keep our spirits up and focused on the progress being made. One question: In the clinical studies that you cite and the procedures that are being done, what has the effect been on neuropathic pain?

  4. #44
    Senior Member rdf's Avatar
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    I want to add my appreciation for what you have chosen to do with your life, Wise. It's quite a sacrifice and committment to do what you do, and maintain and answer questions here, also. Here's to 2007, and good news to come.

    Regarding the nerve rerouting for bladder control, to me this is amazing. For many, it will make sci that much easier to live with. Are there any doctors currently doing this procedure, besides the ones who have operated on BeeBee's son Kevin? Does this proecedure have to be FDA approved?

    And if it works with the bladder so successfully in China, 80% or so, is there a chance it will also work with the anal sphincter, allowing for control of bowel movements?

    Or, is it even possible to reroute nerves to accomplish long distance innervation of other body muscles and organs?

    Meaning, can we reroute nerves to accomplish erections? To make our legs move so they won't atrophy?

    Is it possible I guess I'm saying to reroute a nerve, so that if we, for instance, rubbed our hips, that a rerouted nerve would stimulate our legs to straighten out, and bend with reflexive action?

    Don't worry about answering all the questions, Wise, I'm just kind of musing out loud...but is what I've said remotely possible considering the advancement and acceptance of nerve rerouting?

    Thanks for the time you spend to help us out, you'll surely be appreciated by a higher source, if you so believe in such...as you do from all of us at this time in our lives.

    Happy New Year to you, Wise.
    Please donate a dollar a day at http://justadollarplease.org.
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  5. #45
    Senior Member alan's Avatar
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    In the mean time, how about a cure for central pain and popping scapulas? Pretty please?
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

  6. #46
    Senior Member artsyguy1954's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    what about no DA?
    How could they forget you. A happy, happy 2007 to you to, DA.
    Step up, stand up for:
    http://www.stepnow.org

    'He not busy being born is busy dying." <Bob Dylan>

  7. #47
    Senior Member DA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artsyguy1954
    How could they forget you. A happy, happy 2007 to you to, DA.
    thank you...you too and hopefully we all can have a good 2007 with some super news on the cure. keep your fingers crossed.

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by adi_chicago
    when i read your post tears came off from my eyes.trust me when i was in coma i had a dream a male from asia touched me and told me to walk .
    i walked and i said thank you sir.i thought that dr.huang was the male, i was wrong.
    maybe you are the one.help us please.and one more time i will like to thank you for this great site.keeps sci and people who cares united .
    when i saw the sky opened and jesus my coma ends.
    i belive in science ,but after my experiences i belive in god too.
    all the best and a happy new year.
    Adi, given that over half of the people in the world come from Asia and about half of them are male, your comatose brain may well have been right, that the first therapies to restore function in people with chronic spinal cord injury may be developed by an Asian male. Your brain has about a 25% chance of being right. Having spent much of the last six months in Asia, I am very impressed by the number of very smart people here who have gone into science. They are willing to work very hard and often take very different approaches to biological phenomena. Unlike the trend in western science which has become more and more reductionist, many Asian scientists view the central nervous system more empirically and holistically. But, there are also many great scientists in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Israel. Science is only as good as the scientists. Regarding "god", it is not possible to study life and not be awed by the beauty, simplicity, and diversity of life. The more we know about life, the more incredible it is. For example, we often take our bodies for granted and it is not until that something is not working that we realize the wonderful things that our bodies do without fuss or fanfare. Fixing our bodies is one of the greatest challenges that we face. I am very grateful to be at the right place and time to help a little. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by kate
    Wise, you are one of our big reasons for hope in 2007
    Happy birthday and thank you for another year of progress. All I have to do is imagine what it would be like if there were no CC, no Keck Center, no ChinaSCINet, no Dr. Young . . . and I remember what despair feels like. Your fans in the Pacific Northwest are sending you love and good energy! kate
    ps--also, one of these days, you're going to get a copy of my book in the mail, too.
    kate, thank you. As you know, the Pacific Northwest has many very special people. Bruce and you have been such a joy to know. I treasure the time that I spent with you, Bruce, Cass, Lexi (Tbird), and others in Seattle. If there were no CC, there would not have been ChinaSCINet. I would probably not have had the opportunity to meet you and never would have known what I had missed. That would be really sad indeed. I am really looking forward to reading your book. I am proud to know you. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by rfbdorf
    Not only brilliant, unselfish and hard working, but also a helluva nice guy. I sure hope I can meet you some day, Wise.
    新年快樂 并 生日快樂
    - Richard
    Richard, we will meet. I know it. Patricia Morton and I have been talking about doing a traveling "Open House" after my sabbatical in Asia. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian
    It is so much easier to be optomistic when someone with your expertise makes statements like that and then backs them them up with clearly presented summaries of reasons to be optomistic. Thanks!
    Adrian, thank you. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jenlongdon
    Dr. Young, I woke up this morning paralyzed and hopeless. It doesn't happen often but when it does... I had a tradition of hiking Camelback Mountain every New Year's morning. The rest of the group went and thought of me at the top but it's not the same.

    I hold out hope that I will climb that mountain again. The deal is I'll get myself up, they have to get me down. LOL.

    When you first posted this message, I printed it and keep it close, I emailed it to every SCI and every advocate that I know. NOW is the time to work harder than ever.

    You gave me the hope that I need to keep going. I'm ready to fight on. More letters, more fundraisers, more research studies. Thank you.
    Jenlongdon, you are absolutely right "NOW is the time to work harder than ever". There is so much to do. In my acceptance speech for the Richard H. Shindell Chair in Neuroscience last month, I ended with the following thoughts about CareCure, which might be appropriate to share:
    When I came to Rutgers, I started a web site for the spinal cord injury community. Originally called spinewire.com and now carecure.org, this web site has become a virtual home to over 12,000 people who come daily to find out about care and cure of spinal cord injury. I spend 8 hours a day on this web site and have written nearly 25,000 posts to the community. I have learned much from the people on the site. I thought that I might share one recent post.

    Two days ago, somebody posted a story about a University of Central Florida physicist by the name of Costas Efthimiou who did a simple calculation to show that vampires are a mathematical impossibility. He assumed that the first vampire appeared in 1600, bit and converted 1 victim per month, who in turn bit one victim a month. The exponential series showed that in less than 3 years, the entire population of the world would be vampires.

    It occurred to me that the same mathematical logic could be applied to what we do at the W. M. Keck Center. If each of us converted only one person per month and gave hope to that person, and the person in turn transfected one person a month to have hope, in less than 4 years, we will have converted the whole population of over 5 billion people on this earth. That is what we must do.
    Quote Originally Posted by schmeky
    Dr. Young, You have always been cautiously optimistic in the past. This is the first time I can recall you being assertively confident. Thanx for all you have done and will continue to do.
    schmeky, caution is the armor of scientists and hope is our Achilles heel. That is one of the reasons why we scientists so zealously hide that aspect of ourselves. While most people would consider a p-value of 0.50 (i.e. a 50% chance of that something may be false) to be pretty good odds, scientists have been trained to ignore phenomena that have a p-value greater than 0.05 (i.e. a 5% chance that something may be false or due to chance). The goal of clinical trials, for example, is to optimize the therapy until it generates results that have a p-value of less than 0.05 of being due to chance or control conditions. However, p<0.05 situations are very rare. Most of the important and difficult decisions in life involve p>0.5 situations, when there is not sufficient information for a slam-dunk decision but a lot may be at stake. A while ago, I realized that I was not particularly good at p>0.5 decision-making. Most poker decisions at p>0.50 and so I have been practicing poker (Texas Holdem No Limit) on my Blackberry, to learn how to make such decisions. When playing poker, the decision to bet can be based on optimism concerning what your hand may become or pessimism concerning what your opponent's hand may become to beat you. If you play too cautiously, i.e. bet only when you have sure winners, you will lose because sure winners come too seldom. Of course, if you play too optimistically, you will also lose because luck does not favor optimists or nice guys. Playing poker has helped me to balance hope and caution. Actually, playing against machines and algorithms has been easy. Most programs are too conservative and it is easy to bluff them. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    what about no DA?
    Happy New Year, my friend. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by chaz19
    Jen -- I echo your sentiments. I too printed up Dr. Young's notes sent it to every SCI I know and all of my friends and family to spread the optimism and deep feelings of gratitude that I have.

    John Smith wrote to me a few days ago, and I believe summed up my family and I feelings perfectly ..."Dr. Young, as usual, gave us the stiff drink of hope we needed."

    Thanks for the stiff drink Dr. Young.

    I also have been noticing a change in the way people view science and research pertaining to a cure -- especially receiving letters and greetings around the holidaze... I received a car just yesterday that said "we believe that medical breakthroughs are coming" and this was from a family that has very little understanding of science or research.

    Between Dr. Young's words and my belief in the collective unconscious -- I'm excited to about this new year.!!!

    happy new year everyone
    Chaz, happy new year to you. What a great analogy. We all need to be bartenders at times and give each other good stiff drinks of hope. It is good to hear that you are transfecting others. Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa P
    Dr Young -- While I don't log in very often, I check the site frequently and the best news is to see that you have posted. Thank you so much for all you do to keep our spirits up and focused on the progress being made. One question: In the clinical studies that you cite and the procedures that are being done, what has the effect been on neuropathic pain?
    Lisa, thank you. The studies that I cited did not emphasize neuropathic pain and I was remiss in not having addressed the subject of pain in my message. Let me try to correct that.
    Neuropathic pain. The good news so far in the clinical trials is that none of the therapies tested to date appears to cause or increase neuropathic pain. This was one of the worries that many scientists have. I have long worried that one of the consequences of regeneration may be pain, due to inappropriate connections. To date, this fear has not come true in any clinical trial. It is interesting that olfactory ensheathing glial cell transplants do cause dysesthesia (spontaneous abnormal sensations) and allodynia (hypersensitivity to touch) transiently in the recovering dermatomes. No news is good news in this regard. The yet unanswered question is whether any of the treatments will reduce or eliminate neuropathic pain. Several years ago, Dr. Carlstedt at the Royal Orthopedic Hospital at Stanmore in London reported that insertion of avulsed peripheral nerves into the spinal cord will eliminate the pain associated with brachial plexus injuries. Why this occurs is not understood. However, I have since been wondering whether or not peripheral nerve re-routing has the general property of increasing plasticity of the spinal cord and whether increasing plasticity may be the answer for neuropathic pain. This is of course highly speculative but, given the remarkable ability of the spinal cord to adapt, we should regard neuropathic pain as something that we should be able to treat by encouraging plasticity and rewiring of circuits in the spinal cord.

    Quote Originally Posted by rdf
    I want to add my appreciation for what you have chosen to do with your life, Wise. It's quite a sacrifice and committment to do what you do, and maintain and answer questions here, also. Here's to 2007, and good news to come.

    Regarding the nerve rerouting for bladder control, to me this is amazing. For many, it will make sci that much easier to live with. Are there any doctors currently doing this procedure, besides the ones who have operated on BeeBee's son Kevin? Does this proecedure have to be FDA approved?

    And if it works with the bladder so successfully in China, 80% or so, is there a chance it will also work with the anal sphincter, allowing for control of bowel movements?

    Or, is it even possible to reroute nerves to accomplish long distance innervation of other body muscles and organs?

    Meaning, can we reroute nerves to accomplish erections? To make our legs move so they won't atrophy?

    Is it possible I guess I'm saying to reroute a nerve, so that if we, for instance, rubbed our hips, that a rerouted nerve would stimulate our legs to straighten out, and bend with reflexive action?

    Don't worry about answering all the questions, Wise, I'm just kind of musing out loud...but is what I've said remotely possible considering the advancement and acceptance of nerve rerouting?

    Thanks for the time you spend to help us out, you'll surely be appreciated by a higher source, if you so believe in such...as you do from all of us at this time in our lives.

    Happy New Year to you, Wise.
    rdf, I had asked Dr. Xiao whether or not his patients recover erection, ejaculation, and other sexual functions. He apparently is not sure about sexual function although he said that some of his patients showed improved anal continence after the procedure. Dr. Zhang has told me that he has re-routed nerves from above the injury site to the bladder with some restoration of sexual function but most of his followups emphasize motor function. I believe that this is something that should be studied closely in the patients that are being done in the United States.

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 01-02-2007 at 12:53 AM.

  9. #49
    Senior Member Rollin Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DA
    what about no DA?
    , but hey, maybe we'll see you at the bonfire

  10. #50
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Highlights and (My Reasons for) Hope from 2006
    Wise Young, Ph.D., M.D.
    W. M. Keck Center for Collaborative Neuroscience, Rutgers University
    (Writing from the Hong Kong University where I am a visiting professor)

    I believe that a cure for spinal cord injury is not only on its way but will arrive sooner rather than later.
    What does this mean? That we will soon be able to end this HELLISH SUFFERING CONDITION? Can we be chimed in here. I am lost with everything this is disgusting. If you believe that a chronic cure will be here in 10 or 20 years please tell us so I know what I am in store for. I refuse to be strung along. I want to go about living my life and have some honest answers. I am getting sick and tired of browsing this sight during my work days. I want to give money and help the CHRONIC CURE. Where is that? I am still searching.

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