Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Risk vs. hope: S. Floridians go overseas for stem cells

  1. #1

    Risk vs. hope: S. Floridians go overseas for stem cells

    quote:

    W. Dalton Dietrich, scientific director of the Miami Project, said there have been preliminary talks with the FDA about how best to conduct clinical trials using a combination therapy that the Miami researchers have shown can restore 70 percent of the movement in paralyzed limbs of rats.

    "We're at that phase of the research where we're really thinking seriously about translating it into people, moving things from the bench to bedside, but it's difficult to tell how long that will take," Dietrich said.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Risk vs. hope: S. Floridians go overseas for stem cells

    By Nancy McVicar
    South Florida Sun-Sentinel Health Writer
    Posted December 18 2006


    STORIES
    Be careful
    Dec 18, 2006

    David Aldrich, 49, was paralyzed in a boating accident more than four years ago, and had made his wishes known. If he were hospitalized again and in a near-death situation, he did not want to be resuscitated.

    He thought there was no hope he would walk again.

    But with his family's prodding and financial backing, the former licensed boat captain from Delray Beach traveled to China, where doctors are treating people with spinal cord injuries and other conditions with stem cells obtained from umbilical cord blood. Out-of-pocket costs are high -- $20,000 to $25,000 on average.

    While some umbilical cord stem cell treatments are available in the United States with special permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Aldrich said he opted to go to China because spinal cord treatments are not yet available here. The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis is doing research on embryonic stem cells in animals, but is not ready to try the treatments in humans.

    Slowed by political opposition, embryonic stem cell research is limited to a small number of cell lines that qualify for federal research dollars. Private companies have raised more than $440 million to advance their work outside the confines of federal funding, but for the most part are still in the early stages of laboratory work and animal experiments.

    Several states have enacted stem cell research programs, but they are in their infancies. In Florida, the Supreme Court has been asked to sort out the language in competing proposals for constitutional amendments: One would prevent spending money on embryonic stem cell research; another that would require the state to appropriate $20 million annually for 10 years to pay for such research. Voters could decide the issue in 2008.

    Congress is expected to take up the issue again next year.

    Opponents of embryonic stem cell research argue that the work is unethical because they say it requires ending a human life -- that of an embryo.

    "We are in favor of all types of adult stem cell research and using umbilical cord blood," said Lynda Bell, spokeswoman for the Florida Right to Life Committee. "We support any research that does not require the destruction of a human embryo, but when you're destroying human life to do experimentation, that is wrong."

    As the debate rages, some desperate patients are going to other countries -- China, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, Portugal, Sweden and elsewhere -- hoping for miracle cures now.

    Kayce Barnes, of Margate, has taken her 7-year-old daughter, Brianna, to the Dominican Republic twice for infusions of cells she hopes will save her child from Batten's disease, a rare, fatal degenerative neurological condition.

    more:

    http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features...la-news-health

  2. #2
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    West Monroe, LA, USA
    Posts
    3,405
    Quote:

    W. Dalton Dietrich, scientific director of the Miami Project, said there have been preliminary talks with the FDA about how best to conduct clinical trials using a combination therapy that the Miami researchers have shown can restore 70 percent of the movement in paralyzed limbs of rats.

    "We're at that phase of the research where we're really thinking seriously about translating it into people, moving things from the bench to bedside, but it's difficult to tell how long that will take," Dietrich said.


    Hhhmmm. The 70 percent thing Dietrich refers to cannot be replicated. A few months ago MP was contemplating a Schwann Cell transplant human clinical trial. Now the're back on the (70%) Rolipram combo again. I am confused.

    MP is "thinking seriously about moving things from the bench to the bedside, but can't tell how long it will take"? They seriously don't know how or when?

    I don't understand these contradictory statements, can someone more involved with MP explain it to me? Please.

  3. #3
    Senior Member mikek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Pompano Bch.,Fl. 33060
    Posts
    475
    MP sends a lot of mixed signals and I stopped donating to them 3 years ago. MP should do what private drug companies do hire someone who knows what the FDA wants and how to get a clinical trial off the ground !! Mike

  4. #4
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    near dracula castle
    Posts
    9,508
    Quote Originally Posted by mikek
    MP sends a lot of mixed signals and I stopped donating to them 3 years ago. MP should do what private drug companies do hire someone who knows what the FDA wants and how to get a clinical trial off the ground !! Mike
    why the mp dont ask the president to donate?
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  5. #5
    A link to a 50 minute video of David's story and several others. Very educational about use of stem cells.

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...582&pr=goog-sl

  6. #6
    Received an email from David Aldrich today (below) and want to share his story with those of you who want some proof that stem cells work.

    "Today was truly a day of Thanksgiving for me. I went to therapy for what I expected would be my last day of gait training. They hired a new therapist who is 6'5'' and strong enough to handle my weight. After three sessions of standing in the gait machine he felt that I had the potential to try and stand up without the machine. On the first attempt he said I was able to bear between 50-75 percent of my weight. On the second attempt he told me I was on my own and that he was only using his hands to balance me. Then he wanted me to try to stand from a seated position. ... It was decided that I have the potential to pursue my goal of being able to walk on my own. With the help of Michael, my new therapist, that goal has become more realistic than ever! My stem cells are really working overtime."

    David received his second set of Beike stem cell transplants in China this last summer. He has been agressive with therapy. See his photo.


  7. #7
    that picture... Damn that's inspiration for you in large dozes, when thinking of old footage of him..

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-27-2006, 01:25 AM
  2. stem cells- needed assistance
    By Shwetarose in forum Cure
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-31-2005, 10:53 AM
  3. Why are embryonic stem cells important?
    By Wise Young in forum Cure
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 05-04-2005, 02:49 AM
  4. Philadelphia Chapter President of SCS says..
    By NoDecafPlz in forum Cure
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-01-2004, 02:08 PM
  5. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-25-2004, 11:59 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •