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Thread: have u seen this kind of therapy?

  1. #1

  2. #2
    Do a search for "Giger" or "Schalow" on this site. Wise.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Do a search for "Giger" or "Schalow" on this site. Wise.

    Thank you very much Dr. Young. This is different from loco motor therapy. This is without electric stimulation, and is still works for many people by repetition of movement, is unreal. As you have said that most of spinal cord injury is incomplete, and even 10% connection can recovers some how. Do you think that if doctors believe this many years ago and use this kind of therapy right way maybe a lot of people would have been able to recover some how? Seems to me that many doctors now are believing it. Do you think Christopher reeve did change their minds?
    Last edited by manouli; 12-14-2006 at 05:41 PM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli
    Thank you very much Dr. Young. This is different from loco motor therapy. This is without electric stimulation, and is still works for many people by repetition of movement, is unreal. As you have said that most of spinal cord injury is incomplete, and even 10% connection can recovers some how. Do you think that if doctors believe this many years ago and use this kind of therapy right way maybe a lot of people would have been able to recover some how? Seems to me that many doctors now are believing it. Do you think Christopher reeve did change their minds?
    In my opinion, The real change in the field came in the early 1990's when reports began to filter out of Germany indicating that weight supported ambulation was restoring locomotor in people who had never walked about spinal cord injury. Incidentally, many people with "incomplete' spinal cord injury were told that they will not walk and many consequently did not try. Now, of course, much data indicates that a vast majority of people with incomplete spinal cord injury can recover independent locomotion if they received intensive rehabilitation. Coupled with other work that showed that the brain and spinal cord essentially shut down neural circuitries that they are not using but these circuits can be reactivated with repetitive activity, i.e. reversal of "learned non-use", this realization has led to an entirely new field of rehabilitation. Many rehabilitation centers had to be dragged kicking and screaming to this conclusion but I think that most now accept (although some still do so grudgingly) that substantial recovery is the rule and not the exception in incomplete spinal cord injury.

    The goal of regenerative therapy is of course conversion of people from complete or severe incomplete injuries to more incomplete status. So, this finding that intensive repetivie exercise can restore neural circuits in the spinal cord is very important. It means that clinical trials of regenerative and remyelinative therapiies must be coupled with rehabilitation of the patients. This markedly raises the cost of any clinical trial and this cost is something that that is increasing the expense of clinical trials, something that I am spending a lot of time grappling with.

    Schalow is a very unconventional doctor who use to be in Switzerland. Long before others were saying the repetitive activities could restore function, he was advocating this approach to rehabilitation of people after neurological injuries, particularly children. He invented a number of elegant devices that would allow people to undertake such repetivie activities. For example, the arm/leg cycle that you see in the picture is a wonderful device. It is made by Giger and is unfortunately expensive. However, it is simple enough that most people probably can make a very similar device from bicycle parts. He also advocates crawling, bouncing on a trampoline, and other exercises. These are all essentially repetitive activities. I have long been a proponent of swimming by people with spinal cord injury because it involves repetitive activity without putting a great deal of strain on the joints. Walking itself is of course repetitive.

    Wise.

  5. #5
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    so as i understood the pool theraphy is the best one.women give birth without pain in the water.we are 98% water .the life started in the water.[organic soup].water and theraphy can help us more than other conventional theraphyies?is a very good point of view.lets swimm as much as we can guys.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  6. #6
    Water therapy is interesting. It apparently has different utility for diffferent conditions. I, and other, in a study in the late 80's were recovering the ability to ambulate using weight bearing repetitive walking movements. I was eventually able to walk unasisted (very well) in parralell bars. However, in a pool without my full weight, I can't move at all. At least for me, weight bearing was essential for me to take steps.

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