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Thread: Use of the phrase "Confined to a wheelchair"

  1. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Ozymandias
    I am confined to a wheelchair. It's a horrible thing.
    Oh really? What about when you go in the pool? Confined then? How about the ocean? What about in your bed at night? I don't know about you but I don't sleep in my chair or take it swimming.

  2. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by MattGimpin
    I don't know about you but I don't sleep in my chair or take it swimming.
    Ayup. That's my point exactly.

    C.

  3. #73
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    I haven't read this whole thread - the title caught my eye - and maybe someone has touched on this.

    I have seen people who were confined to wheelchairs - by physical restraints under the pretext of keeping them safe. No one will ever convince me that it was not for the convenience of their institutional caretakers.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Foolish Old
    I have seen people who were confined to wheelchairs - by physical restraints under the pretext of keeping them safe.
    I've seen people strapped into their chairs to give them stability from lack of trunk muscles.

    No one will ever convince me that it was not for the convenience of their institutional caretakers.
    Perhaps, but that doesn't mean that it is automatically wrong depending on the individual and the circumstance.

    Parents put their kids in playpens, which are basically small cages. Do you condemn that? What about high chairs, strollers and baby seats? Cribs? I personally have a problem with parents who set their kids down in front of a TV set for hours at a time because it's the easiest way to distract them and keep them from running around.

    C.

  5. #75
    to me, it's just all words. it sems like every year, the acceptable has suddenly been deemed not politically correct and we have to be called by a new term. what a crock. no matter what people say, my life isn't going to change.

    how are they supposed to know what the proper term is so as not to offend? no one ever died of getting offended. i don't expect people to know how and i don't expect them to be sensitive to my plight. i see no reason to ever get upset about it. mostly i've seen AB partners and friends of "handicapped" people get out of line.

    so my advice would be this, if you want to educate the public, be nice about it. leave your anger at home.

  6. #76
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    I've seen people strapped into their chairs to give them stability from lack of trunk muscles.


    Perhaps, but that doesn't mean that it is automatically wrong depending on the individual and the circumstance.

    Parents put their kids in playpens, which are basically small cages. Do you condemn that? What about high chairs, strollers and baby seats? Cribs? I personally have a problem with parents who set their kids down in front of a TV set for hours at a time because it's the easiest way to distract them and keep them from running around.

    C.
    Tiger, I admit to being a fool, but please give me some small credit for being able to differentiate between care and abuse. Trust me, the Devil has enough advocates - so please don't be concerned that the other side of the coin wasn't viewed.

    Yes, I understand about the need for some folks to have support belts due to trunk muscle weakness. I also know that children should have safety belts in high chairs and car seats. That's not relevant to what I witnessed on many occasions. I'm talking about protesting adults who could walk being tied into wheelchairs and abandoned in front of blaring television sets for long periods of time. This was before patient advocacy and human rights committees were even concepts.

    My point is that the phrase "confined to a wheelchair" is often used much too casually. Anyone who has seen the literal reality of true confinement will appreciate the difference.

    And yes, I do condemn any parent who confines or restrains their child unattended for long periods of time.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

  7. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by wheelz99
    how are they supposed to know what the proper term is so as not to offend?
    I was just having this very same discussion with another member from here at dinner tonight. How can we get offended when they have no idea? Just can't take everything personal. They mean well, try to remember that.

  8. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Foolish Old
    I admit to being a fool, but please give me some small credit for being able to differentiate between care and abuse. Trust me, the Devil has enough advocates - so please don't be concerned that the other side of the coin wasn't viewed.
    I find devil's advocates irritating most of the time. If I sounded like one, I apologize. I didn't mean to. However, I certainly don't need to be reminded to give you credit for anything. I haven't belittled you in any way. I only commented on what I've seen and think and questioned you to clarify your position.

    I understand about the need for some folks to have support belts due to trunk muscle weakness.
    I mentioned what I've seen personally. I have seen in movies and documentaries people with mental disabilities and some types of physical disabilities who were literally tied into their wheelchairs, but not IRL.

    I also know that children should have safety belts in high chairs and car seats. That's not relevant to what I witnessed on many occasions. I'm talking about protesting adults who could walk being tied into wheelchairs and abandoned in front of blaring television sets for long periods of time. This was before patient advocacy and human rights committees were even concepts.
    You didn't spell that out in your first post. I try not to assume things and ask a lot of questions. Answer them or don't. Clarify or don't. I'm getting rather tired of people getting bent over being asked simple questions. I would hope that at this point you would not be one of them.

    However, I've got a few more anyway. These adults you speak of who could speak and walk, couldn't use their hands or their hands were tied down too? Have you seen anything like that lately or are you only bringing up the past to make your point? (which is a valid one, in my opinion)

    My point is that the phrase "confined to a wheelchair" is often used much too casually. Anyone who has seen the literal reality of true confinement will appreciate the difference.
    Indeed. This is exactly why I correct people when they use this phrasing. It is highly inaccurate and shows a lack of perspective.

    And yes, I do condemn any parent who confines or restrains their child unattended for long periods of time.
    That long periods of time thing is the key though.

    C.

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by wheelz99
    it sems like every year, the acceptable has suddenly been deemed not politically correct and we have to be called by a new term.
    That is quite an exaggeration. There has been no great change in terminology referring to people with disabilities in some time now.

    no matter what people say, my life isn't going to change.
    You may want to do a bit of checking into the connection between language and reality. You are wrong if you think that the words people use don't matter and don't affect you. Words shape thought. The way people think about you affects how they treat you.

    how are they supposed to know what the proper term is so as not to offend?
    By being educated.

    so my advice would be this, if you want to educate the public, be nice about it. leave your anger at home.
    Absolutely. I don't actually find this kind of inaccurate terminology to be offensive. It comes from ignorance and ignorance is curable. It's just up to each individual to take the time to educate when the opportunity arises.

    C.

  10. #80
    Senior Member Foolish Old's Avatar
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    C,

    The point of my post was that confinement is a strong word. I don't think ill of people who use it without thinking, but I do wish they would consider the power of their words in shaping the perception of wheelers. I do find it condescending that you would find the need to explain to me that there might be legitimate reasons to secure a person into a wheelchair.


    To satisfy your curiosity...In some instances the folks I spoke of had their wrists restrained. Others were only bound around the chest and tied in behind old fashioned high back chairs. No, I no longer have occasion to witness such happenings. I would be surprised (overjoyed) if inappropriate use of physical and chemical restraints has been entirely eliminated in institutional settings.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

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