Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Transfer problem

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    109

    Transfer problem

    Hey guys - wow, it's been forever since I've been on here.

    I just started a new job as a parapro (teachers aide) at the high school. I'm with a 15 year old girl with cerebral palsy. I'm having an issue with transfers and I'm hoping for some insight.

    When I try to get her out of her chair and onto her potty chair, I can get her into a standing position, get her pants down, but when I sit her onto the potty chair, I'm not getting her high enough. It seems like that little "step" I need to get her feet on is what's tripping me up.

    The first time I tried to transfer her on my own, I got stuck. I got her out of her chair, pivioted her, got her to hold onto my belt loops while I got her pants down, then tried to lift her with a "hug" onto the toilet. I couldn't get her as far back on the toilet as she needed to be, and then I couldn't get her high enough to get her back onto her regular chair correctly. I ended up having to call the nurse on my cell phone to come down and help me lift her.

    Maybe I'm holding her too high, I've been "hugging" her underneath her armpits, do I just need to go lower? Any suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated. Yesterday was my second attempt at getting her on. We had the school nurse come along as a precaution, but the student was having some bladder issues this week, so she didn't get on again.

    I feel bad for this poor girl, dealing with me learning this! Anyone know what I'm doing wrong? I don't want to hurt this poor child!
    Last edited by luvmy2gals; 11-30-2006 at 11:04 AM.

  2. #2
    Are you doing this in the regular student bathroom with adult height toilets or a wheelchair accessible bathroom with ADA height toilets? Would it be possible to get either a height adjustable commode chair instead? I assume she is not very tall, and a regular or ADA height toilet might be the problem. How tall is she? How much does she weigh?

    Another option (safer for you and her) is to use a stand-up lift, but there would be the problem of storage for this.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    109
    We're in a regular bathroom, teacher's bathroom actually. I dont' believe the toilet is any lower. She has a white pvc-ish potty chair that I put over the toilet before I put her on it. The problem I'm having is the foot rests. I can't get her high enough to get her over it.

    This is her first year at the high school, she is actually zoned for another district where the building is much more accessable, there are a ton of family reasons why she's here. All that to say, that next year she may be at the more accessible school. The school we're in is a very old building. But for now....

    She is about 110, 115 lbs. and she doesn't know how tall she is since her spine is so curved. She is the sweetest thing. I hate that she's having to go through this with me! I'm 5'8" but I have very weak arms, and I'm trying not to use my back. Today I'm going to make sure that I lift her lower, maybe try from around her waist once I have her standing. Otherwise, I just am at a loss.

    And you're right about the standing lift, there isn't room for it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Quadcessible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    150
    If the footrest can't be removed, attempt to swing her legs to the side, if possible over the footrest in the direction of the transfer. It's easier to follow the legs through the transfer as apposed to pulling them along, if possible even use the feet as a pivot guide. (Easy on your back)

  5. #5
    I suspect she is too short for the commode being used. Can it be lowered, or can a shorter one (one with adjustable height legs) be obtained?

    (KLD)

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    109
    Nope -- toilet can't be lowered. Her PT has ordered a step - like an aerobic step - to put in the bathroom. Her thinking is to put her feet directly on that as I lift her and swivel her over, so I don't have to worry about her feet as I'm holding and lifting her. For now, I'm grabbing the school nurse or another teacher to help me lift her.

    Something else I've found out helps me get her back into her regular wheelchair, is to get her on best that I can, then have her tilt her chair back, and I can use gravity to help me pull her farther up on her chair.

  7. #7
    You are putting yourself at risk (and exceeding OSHA standards) doing transfers like this. I would insist on a better solution and better plan being initiated if you want to continue in this job.

    (KLD)

  8. #8
    Have the school district purchase a patient lifter. SCI Nurse is right that you are putting yourself and the kid in danger of injury.
    Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

    I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

  9. #9
    Quite apart from other considerations, the school district should be made to understand that it's a lot cheaper for them to purchase a lifter or other appropriate equipment than for you to be injured on the job, or for the child to be injured in a fall.
    - Richard

  10. #10
    Have you had instruction in lifting and transferring?

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 70
    Last Post: 01-22-2005, 03:12 PM
  2. All kids should have this drug problem
    By Hunker in forum Life
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-30-2004, 02:28 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-13-2003, 10:39 PM
  4. Quad C6 rugby transfer
    By coolbab64 in forum Recreation, Sports, Travel, & Hobbies
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-09-2002, 01:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •