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Thread: Embryonic versus Adult Stem Cells and other spinal cord injury therapies

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by keeping on View Post
    Dr young, the last couple of days has been a series of blubs on problems with some of the propsed treatments; except for yours. Can you give us your fix on these blubs?
    Can you be more specific? I don't know which "blubs" you are referrring to. Wise.

  2. #52
    Hello, I just joined here and was reading through this thread, and thought I should bring into the discussion the risk of cancer from many of the stem cell treatments. I am a molecular biologist that has been researching different types of cancer for over 15 years, and just 2 years ago I hit a tree snowboarding and am now a t6 complete para, so I've become interested in SCI research, though I have little time to work it in w/ my currently funded cancer research... I am working on ways to target brain cancer stem cells (I should explain to the non-scientists here that these are not the same as the stem cells you hear about in the media, but the same idea) it seems that over a long term, introducing stem cells into the CNS may lead to cancer unless some way of differentiating the injected cells is developed. Also, what of the loss of telomere length in adult stem cells or induced cells? Won't this decrease longevity of these types of stem cells, and make their progeny inherently more prone to cancer?

  3. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by dr.zapp View Post
    Hello, I just joined here and was reading through this thread, and thought I should bring into the discussion the risk of cancer from many of the stem cell treatments. I am a molecular biologist that has been researching different types of cancer for over 15 years, and just 2 years ago I hit a tree snowboarding and am now a t6 complete para, so I've become interested in SCI research, though I have little time to work it in w/ my currently funded cancer research... I am working on ways to target brain cancer stem cells (I should explain to the non-scientists here that these are not the same as the stem cells you hear about in the media, but the same idea) it seems that over a long term, introducing stem cells into the CNS may lead to cancer unless some way of differentiating the injected cells is developed. Also, what of the loss of telomere length in adult stem cells or induced cells? Won't this decrease longevity of these types of stem cells, and make their progeny inherently more prone to cancer?
    Dr. Z,

    In practice, very few (if any) transplants of stem cells into the brain and spinal cord (of both human and animals) have resulted in cancer. Maybe this is because almost all the transplants that have been done have been allografts (i.e. from one individual to another) or xenografts (i.e. from an individual of one species to an individual of another species) and therefore were rejected by the immune system.

    Only one case of cancer has been reported from transplants of fetal cell transplants into human and this is in a child who received multiple fetal cell transplants for a condition called ataxia telangiectasia and developed a tumor that came from the transplanted cells (Source).

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a condition that has a propensity for brain tumor formation and may involve a defect in the brain's immune system. Over the past two decades, hundreds (or even thousands) of people have received fetal cell transplants for Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, and other conditions. This is the only case of tumor that has been reported.

    Of course, there has not been a documented case of embryonic stem cell transplants in human. Note that I would not consider the cells that Geeta Shroff is transplanting in India to be embryonic stem cells until some independent group has examined and verified the cells. So, the concern that stem cell transplants cause brain tumors is still largely theoretical.

    If you read the literature of telomere lengths in iPS, you will find that most iPS cells acquire the characteristic of indefinite self-renewal capacity through the induction of telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). The iPS cells have long telomere (Source). A recent study reported that telomere lengths are lengthened in IPS cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients, a condition where telomere maintenance is defective (Source), suggesting that reproramming restores telomere elongation even in the presence of genetic lesions affecting telomerase.

    Wise.

  4. #54

    can this line of treatment be used for SB?

    wondering if this type of treatment can be used for dead or underdeveloped nerves like in SB?

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by lonibaloney View Post
    wondering if this type of treatment can be used for dead or underdeveloped nerves like in SB?
    As you know, spina bifida is a extremely diverse condition resulting from failure of the lower spinal canal to close to failure of the spinal cord to develop. In severe cases of spinal bifida, there may be failure of the lower spinal cord to develop. I am skeptical whether implantation of stem cells alone would recapitulate development and restore the spinal cord. On the other hand, if there is loss of some neurons, it is possible that neural stem cells can replace the neurons. Neural stem cells can be obtained from the subventricular zone of adults, fetal neural stem cells from the brains or spinal cord of fetuses, induced neural stem cells (recently there was a study indicating that neural progenitor cells can be induced from skin and other cells).

    Wise.

  6. #56
    http://www.gadaily.com/index.php/sec...esearch-debate; the furitless debate goes on; this is getting old and the burgermeisters are still hanging on. We need the testin g at Shepherfd to be successful and Wise's tirals to be successful. We need definitve success to point to and to put the Republicans to sleep once and for all.

  7. #57
    Hello dr young , I am new to the forum. My daughter has an 8 year old injury - c1/c2 on a vent. She's 10. You discuss the need to ensure the stem cells aren't immune rejected. Does it help to store the umbilical cord of a newborn sybling?thank you for all your work. We actually live in nj

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by keeping on View Post
    http://www.gadaily.com/index.php/sec...esearch-debate; the furitless debate goes on; this is getting old and the burgermeisters are still hanging on. We need the testin g at Shepherfd to be successful and Wise's tirals to be successful. We need definitve success to point to and to put the Republicans to sleep once and for all.
    Is there an organization for people living with SCI, their family and friends who are democrats, republicans or independents to write letters as a group?

    From: A Service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health ". . . 12,000 new cases each year. Since there have not been any overall incidence studies of SCI in the U.S. since the 1970's it is not known if incidence has changed in recent years."
    http://www.spinalcord.uab.edu/show.asp?durki=116979

    Since the 1970s? Are there current statistics?
    Last edited by Darryl; 10-24-2010 at 09:10 PM. Reason: Clarity

  9. #59
    Dr. Young many thanks to you and all of the brilliant minds out there engaged in Stem cell research. Too bad you and I are going to hell (eyes rolling) for believing in one of the great evils of Science.
    Regarding the discussion about Dems and Reps and who believes what I suggest you good folks go take a short test on the Politics of Fear I devised (in the Politics forum) to find out where you "stand".
    Seriously, keep up the great work Doctor.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by eli View Post
    Hello dr young , I am new to the forum. My daughter has an 8 year old injury - c1/c2 on a vent. She's 10. You discuss the need to ensure the stem cells aren't immune rejected. Does it help to store the umbilical cord of a newborn sybling?thank you for all your work. We actually live in nj
    Hi eli,

    Dr. Young is traveling and prob didn't see this.
    Sorry to hear about your daughter.
    It is a good idea to store umbilical cord blood. I believe there is only a 1 in 4 chance that siblings will match.

    If you donate your UCB to this company, they will provide you with a match in return for your cord blood. http://www.stemcyteinc.com/

    We have an Open House next Friday 11/5 if you can make the trip- http://keck.rutgers.edu/contact/contact.html

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