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Thread: Oxycyte - Blood Substitute (sort of)

  1. #1

    Oxycyte - Blood Substitute (sort of)

    This may benefit acute spinal cord injured patients as well.
    **************************************************

    From Popular Science Magazine:

    Better Than Blood?

    A man-made, pure-white compound called Oxycyte carries oxygen 50 times as effectively as our own blood. Researchers are betting that it’s the best way to treat America’s leading cause of accidental death: traumatic brain injury

    By Nicole Davis | November 2006

    Grace LeClair had just finished eating dinner with friends when she got the phone call every parent dreads. The chaplain at the Medical College of Virginia was on the other end. “Your daughter has been in a serious accident. You should come to Richmond right away.” LeClair was in Virginia Beach at the time, a two-hour drive from 20-year-old Bess-Lyn, who was now lying in a coma in a Richmond hospital bed.

    The friend who was with Bess-Lyn has since filled in the details of that day in March. The two women were bicycling down a steep hill, headed toward a busy intersection, when Bess-Lyn yelled that her brakes weren’t working and she couldn’t slow down. Her friend screamed for her to turn into an alley just before the intersection. But Bess-Lyn didn’t turn sharply enough and crashed, headfirst, into a concrete wall. She wasn’t wearing a helmet. By the time the ambulance reached the hospital, Bess-Lyn was officially counted among the 1.5 million Americans who will suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) this year...

  2. #2
    I think DA posted something on this a little while back.

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...&highlight=bet
    Last edited by Tufelhunden; 11-20-2006 at 05:58 PM.
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  3. #3
    This is interesting. The search for a non-human source blood replacement has been going on forever. I was a blood bank tech pre-SCI and they always think they have a red blood cell substitute but it falls through.

    Advantages: No disease transmission. Refrigeration requirements probably less stringent (blood products are really picky about temperature.) Less chance of bacterial contamination. No danger of antibody/antigen incompatibility or stimulating antibody production. None of the endless problems of "rare blood types". None of the seasonal supply shortages that are ubiquitous in this field.

    Just think what a boon something like this would be on the battlefield. Amazing.

    Years ago I watched a video about hepatitis in the blood supply. At that time they could test for A, B, and what they called hepatitis non-A, non-B. The scientist giving the presentation said there was undoubtedly hepatitis A through Z out there, unidentified and impossible to test for. So many truly icky things are passed through the blood supply. A lot depends on honest donors that tell the truth in the pre-donation screening. Just not a great system, no matter what safeguards are implemented.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Tufelhunden
    I think DA posted something on this a little while back.
    Oops! You're right. I did a search for Oxycyte before I started a new thread and didn't find anything.

    C.

  5. #5
    Senior Member JCAT's Avatar
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    [quote=betheny] . The search for a non-human source blood replacement has been going on forever.

    Polyheme

    Polyheme is a hemoglobin based oxygen carrier, a blood substitute and has been available since the mid-80's.
    It represents the leading technology in this field, and it can be used amoung various blood types.

    Oxycyte

    Question how is this beneficial to an acute spinal cord injury?
    Did I miss something in the post.
    J

  6. #6
    Senior Member Scott Buxton's Avatar
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    Being a person with TBI, I wish future people good luck with this. It might be great.

    Also, it might help people with acute SCI because I believe I've heard that they are having some success in Seattle using super-oxygen-concentrations after injuries. But I could be wrong.

    Scott.

  7. #7
    So I wonder where they use the polyheme? I was in a busy blood bank, in a busy bloodbanking part of the country, through most of the 90's. Did lots of continuing education, weeklong tutorals, they were BIG on education where I worked. (Hence the video on various types of hepatitis.)

    I heard a lot about the quest for a substitute, never much about locating one though...

    More about Polyheme:

    Polyheme still in clinical trials; there seems to be a LOT of controversy about the product. They found a loophole allowing them to give it to trauma cases without informed consent...AFTER it allegedly caused adverse effects in previous trials. Didn't go over too well.

    http://www.acronymrequired.com/2006/...t_plastic.html
    Last edited by betheny; 11-21-2006 at 12:47 AM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JCAT
    how is this beneficial to an acute spinal cord injury?
    Did I miss something in the post.
    Yup. It's good for SCI for the same reason it's good for TBI. Lack of oxygen can cause the tissues to die. This product may prevent that from happening.

    Spinal Zap

    C.

  9. #9
    Senior Member JCAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    Yup. It's good for SCI for the same reason it's good for TBI. Lack of oxygen can cause the tissues to die. This product may prevent that from happening.

    Spinal Zap

    C.
    Thanks, missed it entirely.

    J

  10. #10
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Arrow New chemical helps prevent brain injury using oxygen

    New chemical helps prevent brain injury using oxygen
    2/21/2007 3:09 PM
    By: Ivanhoe Broadcast News
    Dr. Bruce Spiess at work on Oxycyte, the chemical that could help repair injured brain tissue. Every year, about 1.5 million Americans will suffer a traumatic brain injury. Dr. Bruce Spiess from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Va., said about 30 percent of those people will die.
    "There is no magic pill or treatment for traumatic brain injury in terms of salvaging brain tissue. There is no way that we know of now to keep brain tissue alive," Speiss said.
    Oxygen is a vital nutrient the brain can't survive without. When a brain is injured, swelling keeps the red blood cells from carrying enough oxygen to the brain. Spiess is studying a new way to deliver oxygen to vital organs called Oxycyte.
    Oxycyte is a liquid, Teflon-like chemical that contains carbon and fluoride and can carry large amounts of oxygen. The particles in Oxycyte are about 1/50 to 1/100 the size of a red blood cell, so Oxycyte can carry oxygen to the brain when red blood cells can't get through.


    http://www.news8austin.com/content/h...179581&SecID=2

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