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Thread: Do you work?

  1. #51
    Senior Member danielgr's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by rybread
    That's funny, I was a Ford mechanic too. I worked in trim/AC, but was trained bumper-to-bumper. What did you use to do?
    I was a technician, I did the normal repairs like tune ups, oil changes, tires, driveablility, engine repair, alignments, and I also drove the tow truck. Now I can't work in the shop (which I really do miss), but I do get to repair cars/trucks over the phone. I just don't get my hands dirty anymore. The best part of this job is that I get to fix vehicles with real problems and they can be challenging at times. I deal with all the Jaguar-Land Rover dealers across North America.
    I live alone, which it can be lonely some times, but I work full time and it's about 1 and half hour drive to see the family. It's a lot better then sitting around the house all the time. That was driving me crazy after my accident and the most depressing time of my life. After I found a job in Detroit, I took that BIG leap into Independents and took the chance of living on my own.

    Sorry for carrying on when you just asked "what did you do". It got away from me.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiger Racing
    Oh, OK, so in order to utilize CAD skills at Ford you'd need to move to Detroit? That's a bummer. When you were injured, how did your employer respond? Was there any talk of retraining or relocation?

    C.
    Actually, I could easily become telephone tech support for Ford, but I'd have to live in the Michigan area to do that. I'm interested in CAD because it comes very naturally to me (the 3-D spatial reasoning part). Check out my vocational rehab assessment:
    Attachment 16678
    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
    Scottsdale, AZ

    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

  3. #53
    \I'm just curious, how many of us work, how long have you been paralyzed, how old were you when you became paralyzed, what level are you, what did you do before your paralysis, what you do know or what do you plan on doing,is there anything holding you back from working and do you receive any kind of disability payment?
    SCI since 1996, I was barely 22, I am a C/6.
    Before SCI, I was a college flunky, my mom died my first spring semester in college and I did not know what I wanted to do so I partied (she is not the total reason obviously!). I'm not afraid to admit this. Then I became involved in retail management and really liked it but it didn't pay very well. Then I moved to Texas. My retail management company wanted me back, (which I was going to), but I had my accident along the desert highway the week before I was supposed to leave Texas. I went back to school living in a nursing home after I finally got out of nine months of being in hospitals. I transferred to a university a year and a half later, and got an internship. And now after becoming an employed, seven years later I am still employed with the agency, at different location, had several types of jobs, and now working in civil rights and diversity. I'm not certain at all that this will be my last job type I do forever, but try to learn new things every day and certainly never thought I'd be working for the feds.

    I received SSDI, Medicare and Medicaid until an employed after accident. Now, no assistance. Vocational rehabilitation helped me supplement Medicaid while moving from various counties in the state so I could continue my vocational goals. And, they helped me until I found my job. It wasn't easy, but as long as you had goals and could prove you were meeting them, they helped. Perhaps it was also better that I was alone, without family support and outside finances.

    What frustrates me the most today and on this journey of SCI (having a disability) so far is that once you become employed, you have to have a income that you can live on, plus pay your attendants for help, plus find all resources your self, and do this in a world that is able-bodied catered to. It is so unfortunate in the United States that we have to be considered "homebound" and not able to go out of the household to receive personal care assistants, or live on Medicaid with which you must not have any substantial income. By definition of "substantial", each state's guidelines are different, but the money is minimal and not easily livable for a quad. These minimal living standards force a lot of disabled people to live taking chances that they won't get "caught" by the system, because they are trying to survive. All disabled people want to do, is just be like anyone else. Why should we be forced to stay in our homes, and not in society adding to its diverse structure already in place?

    I hope in the future that healthcare regulations will change and we will be able to not have to struggle with these issues. Anyone who says they don't, either has some source of compensation or is in some fairytale land.

    Best wishes, stay positive, and you can do it!
    Last edited by Lizbv; 08-05-2007 at 12:28 PM.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Lizbv

    What frustrates me the most today and on this journey so far is that once you become employed, you have to have a income that you can live on, plus pay your attendants for help, plus find all resources your self, and do this in a world that is able-bodied catered to. It is so unfortunate in the United States that we have to be considered "homebound" and not able to go out of the household to receive personal care assistants, or live on Medicaid with which you must not have any substantial income. By definition of "substantial", each state's guidelines are different, but the money is minimal and not easily livable for a quad.

    I hope in the future that healthcare regulations will change and we will be able to not have to struggle with these issues. Anyone who says they don't, either has some source of compensation or is in some fairytale land.

    Best wishes, stay positive, and you can do it!
    You're right, this part of the US healthcare system is a disgrace. In the UK there is a lot of financial help to get you back to work - including up to 80% state funding on adaptive equipment, plus we receive a tax free 'disability living allowance' and PCA support is largely funded by the Government. Medical supplies are free.

    We do pay shitloads of tax on everything though.
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by RehabRhino
    You're right, this part of the US healthcare system is a disgrace. In the UK there is a lot of financial help to get you back to work - including up to 80% state funding on adaptive equipment, plus we receive a tax free 'disability living allowance' and PCA support is largely funded by the Government. Medical supplies are free.

    We do pay shitloads of tax on everything though.
    Hi rhino. Yes other countries seem to have different noticeably better systems in place. But I guess the keyword I want to emphasize is that once you find employment the financial resources are generally cut that you may likely have received while working to be employed. There is no guarantee your income will be able to supplement necessary things required in living with a disability.

    Is the answer to healthcare problems this then: A country must increase its taxes for healthcare to be successful and help all of its recipients?

  6. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Lizbv
    Is the answer to healthcare problems this then: A country must increase its taxes for healthcare to be successful and help all of its recipients?
    I don't know Liz. For the system we have in the UK - which is far from perfect - to be emulated in the US would cost trillions.

    I'm not sure how high taxes are in the US. Would the population stand for a tax hike to improve healthcare? You'll be paying for Iraq for years.

    I know I moan less about my 40% tax bracket now than I did before SCI.
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  7. #57
    Senior Member
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    Philadelphia, PA
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    Another Consultant??/

    Quote Originally Posted by steveg
    Do you receive any kind of disability payment? No. I am a Management Consultant for a large consulting firm
    WOW - I do not have an SCI, I have MD and cannot walk (I had a stroke at the age of 21 and was totally healthy before it). I am a Mgt. Consultant in Human Performance and Change Management with a large consulting firm. I was asking my HR person today if she knows anyone at my company who also uses a chair and she is hitting a roadblock finding folks for me to network with. We should connect!

    Best,

    Jenn
    "Be ashamed to die until you have done something small for humanity." Horace Mann

  8. #58
    I wonder if in the UK there are as many people who claim disability who are not truly disabled. Maybe that's where a lot of our money goes. I see it often. My neighbor near me for example. He receives SSDI. He is not what I would consider disabled. He's a runner. He runs miles. ???
    If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


    Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

  9. #59
    Senior Member NEWPARA's Avatar
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    Apr 2007
    Location
    monrovia ca.
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    481
    Injured in april 06
    I was 42
    I dont work yet
    Before I was a self employed carpenter
    Im reciving medical ssdi

  10. #60
    Senior Member wheelchairTITAN's Avatar
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    Oakville, ON ... Just North of the 43rd Parallel, SocialistLand
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielgr
    I was a technician, I did the normal repairs like tune ups, oil changes, tires, driveablility, engine repair, alignments, and I also drove the tow truck. Now I can't work in the shop (which I really do miss), but I do get to repair cars/trucks over the phone. I just don't get my hands dirty anymore. The best part of this job is that I get to fix vehicles with real problems and they can be challenging at times. I deal with all the Jaguar-Land Rover dealers across North America.
    I live alone, which it can be lonely some times, but I work full time and it's about 1 and half hour drive to see the family. It's a lot better then sitting around the house all the time. That was driving me crazy after my accident and the most depressing time of my life. After I found a job in Detroit, I took that BIG leap into Independents and took the chance of living on my own.

    Sorry for carrying on when you just asked "what did you do". It got away from me.
    Thanks for sharing and taking the time to tell us a little about you. You have a great group here who can be a great support.

    Have a great week. I apppreciated your openess.

    Cheers,
    Bill

    William

    ... rolling since 1989
    ...

    BE NICE!It's free

    P.S. ~ I have "handicapabilities"

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