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Thread: humans and fire

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by betheny
    My horse jumped the fence when the pasture was on fire. (She ran FROM the fire.) The only other time she jumped the fence was to get away from the other horses to give birth.

    I was surprised to realize she could jump the fence at will. Most times I guess she just didn't want to.
    I think if animals have the time to rationalize they will do just that.
    Your most likely right about your mare. She didn't have a reason or desire to jump that fence..only doing it when needed.
    Just like those elephants in Indonesia dealing with the tsunami. They had huge chains around their legs..and when they NEEDED to be set free..one SNAP and they were going uphill.
    Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Wesley
    my dogs love curling up near the fireplace.
    Wesley, yes, dogs do love to curl up near a fire. I thought that I would search the internet for examples of apes that have been able start fires and came across an ape that pulled a fire alarm:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15392875/
    Ape learns human lesson: Don’t pull fire alarm
    ‘It's my understanding that she's been told not to do it again,’ official says
    IMAGE: Panbanisha
    AP

    This undated photo provided by the Great Ape Trust shows Panbanisha, who pulled the fire alarm Friday, sending out the fire department to the Great Ape Trust of Iowa in Des Moines.

    Updated: 9:33 p.m. ET Oct. 23, 2006

    DES MOINES, Iowa - One of the great apes at a research center in Des Moines has learned a valuable lesson: don't pull the fire alarm. A bonobo named Panbanisha did just that last Friday, sending out the fire department to the Great Ape Trust of Iowa.

    Fire department spokesman Brian O'Keefe said Monday it was the first known case of an animal setting off a fire alarm in Des Moines.

    Trust spokesman Al Setka said a 25-year-old female named Panbanisha was the guilty ape.
    Story continues below ↓ advertisement

    Setka said Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, a lead scientist at the trust focusing on studying the behavior and intelligence of bonobos, scolded Panbanisha.

    "It's my understanding that she's been told not to do it again," Setka said.

    The fire alarm is on a wall in the bonobo home in an area used by the apes and members of the scientific team. Panbanisha is one of seven bonobos at the Great Ape Trust, and was among the first group to arrive in April 2005. Bonobos are among the most human-like of the great apes.

    <more>

  3. #13
    I'd be interested to see what happens when you take an animal that is afraid of fire and show it something like this: http://www.vat19.com/dvds/ambf.cfm

    Would the fear transfer to the television image?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by emilstringer
    I'd be interested to see what happens when you take an animal that is afraid of fire and show it something like this: http://www.vat19.com/dvds/ambf.cfm

    Would the fear transfer to the television image?
    Hey, that could be an experiment although interpretation may be difficult. You would have to have a control image to compare against the fire image. Animals respond variably to images on televisions. Most dogs, in my experience, watch television. However, I don't think that rats watch television. Wise.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Hey, that could be an experiment although interpretation may be difficult. You would have to have a control image to compare against the fire image. Animals respond variably to images on televisions. Most dogs, in my experience, watch television. However, I don't think that rats watch television. Wise.
    Dr. Wise,
    Perhaps your lab rats don't care for C-Span.
    Try Animal Planet. All those predators might get a reaction out of them.
    Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Lindox
    Dr. Wise,
    Perhaps your lab rats don't care for C-Span.
    Try Animal Planet. All those predators might get a reaction out of them.
    Interesting experiment to try. We have some videos of rats. Perhaps showing them rats will attract some interest. In addition to trying out some predators, I was thinking that an equally compelling motivation may be sexual. I wonder if male rats have a preference for young nubile females walking across the screen and whether female rats (like female humans) may show less interest in a "handsome" male walking across the screen. That would provide a rigorous control of what the rats are actually perceiving on the screen, if we can show a gender specific attraction to the images.

    Wise.

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