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Thread: Movie Critics Thread

  1. #21
    Senior Member cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    Yeah, and I'm a drooling, senile illiterate. So, you're the CCC Celebrity Girl...(drum roll) because you're getting so much cool return.

    So, how about letting Jeff decide? Or just settling for having Thelma & Louise up now and Pulp Fiction up next? Why Pulp Fiction, btw?
    o well thank you!

    jeff can decide...*gulp* i haven't seen thelma and louise

    i like pulp fiction! i like how they go from scene to scene, and my favorite part is where they accidentally shoot marvin in the head.
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  2. #22
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    Pulp Fiction

    Quote Originally Posted by cali
    o well thank you!

    jeff can decide...*gulp* i haven't seen thelma and louise

    i like pulp fiction! i like how they go from scene to scene, and my favorite part is where they accidentally shoot marvin in the head.
    The scene you mention is my least favorite one in PF, but let's keep it light.

    Film Critiquing Word for today:verisimilitude: ver‧i‧si‧mil‧i‧tude*

    When I watch a movie I need a number of things to be happening for me to engage with the characters as people I care about. Likewise, I need for certain things not to be happening and perhaps foremost of these is that the flick not fail to maintain a certain level of plausable verisimilitude throughout. Depending on the nature of the film and the "reality universe" it poses, this level will vary.

    Let me ask you how much blood and brain matter you suppose would be the maximum amount that could realistically be looked to to leave a persons head that had been shot in the way Marvin was shot by Vincent? OK, let's suppose, just for arguement, that it was enough to make the mess we see Marvin's heads ejected contents making in the movie. Even so, can you believe that it could find its way onto all the cars surfaces that it does in the movie?

    There is another variable where the cutoff point for verisimilitude violation is found in each movie; how engaged/engrossed I am when the offending scene or scenes take place. In Pulp Fiction, with the exception of one notable sequence, that point was very low because I failed to establish any kind of empathy for the characters. Vincent is superficial and vain and so is his partner, Jules; in fact everyone in the movie seems to be carrying a supersized load of vanity, but then that is one of the essences of pulp fiction (and one of the reasons I've never cared for the art from).

    I'd like to think, for your sake at least, you are kidding about not being able to get out to shop with a whole week to do it. Tell me it aint so.


    *http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/verisimilitude

  3. #23
    Senior Member cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juke_spin
    The scene you mention is my least favorite one in PF, but let's keep it light.

    Film Critiquing Word for today:verisimilitude: ver‧i‧si‧mil‧i‧tude*

    When I watch a movie I need a number of things to be happening for me to engage with the characters as people I care about. Likewise, I need for certain things not to be happening and perhaps foremost of these is that the flick not fail to maintain a certain level of plausable verisimilitude throughout. Depending on the nature of the film and the "reality universe" it poses, this level will vary.

    Let me ask you how much blood and brain matter you suppose would be the maximum amount that could realistically be looked to to leave a persons head that had been shot in the way Marvin was shot by Vincent? OK, let's suppose, just for arguement, that it was enough to make the mess we see Marvin's heads ejected contents making in the movie. Even so, can you believe that it could find its way onto all the cars surfaces that it does in the movie?

    There is another variable where the cutoff point for verisimilitude violation is found in each movie; how engaged/engrossed I am when the offending scene or scenes take place. In Pulp Fiction, with the exception of one notable sequence, that point was very low because I failed to establish any kind of empathy for the characters. Vincent is superficial and vain and so is his partner, Jules; in fact everyone in the movie seems to be carrying a supersized load of vanity, but then that is one of the essences of pulp fiction (and one of the reasons I've never cared for the art from).

    I'd like to think, for your sake at least, you are kidding about not being able to get out to shop with a whole week to do it. Tell me it aint so.


    *http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/verisimilitude
    i guess i liked it for it's dark humour and the fact that i didn't have to get attached to any certain character in order to enjoy it.

    of course it isn't very realistic but i like that scene purely for the unexpected event. and how vincent was so casual about it. actually, i also liked how jules has the pieces of it in his hair and acts like it's nothing. i just liked the dark humour in it.

    as for the shop thing, it's everyone's chore and honestly, i'm not too keen on hearing how much of a pain in the ass it is for everyone to take a tape back when in reality it's no big thing. martyr moms and dads are frustrating.
    Never take life seriously, nobody gets out alive anyway

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  4. #24
    did that end the Pulp talk? i didn't care for it the 1st time around nor would i like Natural Born Killers to be a choice, but hey, who the hell am i? cali girl is the Superstar.

    Heat comes to my mind, but Thelma and Louise wouldn't be a bad choice..





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  5. #25
    Senior Member cali's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2jazzyjeff
    did that end the Pulp talk? i didn't care for it the 1st time around nor would i like Natural Born Killers to be a choice, but hey, who the hell am i? cali girl is the Superstar.

    Heat comes to my mind, but Thelma and Louise wouldn't be a bad choice..
    yea i guess pulp talk is over, i thought more people would have something to day about it but i was wrong. ah well, no biggie.


    i didn't see heat either. i suck...
    Never take life seriously, nobody gets out alive anyway

    Frank's blog:
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    My regular blog:
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  6. #26
    Vincent is superficial and vain and so is his partner, Jules; in fact everyone in the movie seems to be carrying a supersized load of vanity, but then that is one of the essences of pulp fiction (and one of the reasons I've never cared for the art from).
    Continuing on this point, wouldn't the final scene bring this theme around full circle? Dressed in shorts and T-shirts, being held up by a couple of two-bit wannabe hoods, Jules has a revelation about all the bad stuff he's done, while Vincent's taking a dump. In not sharing in Jules' revelation, Vincent ultimately gets shot by Butch (Bruce Willis), by his own gun, while taking a dump. In a Shakespearian tragedy, everybody dies, a la Reservoir Dogs. In a Shakespearian comedy, almost everyone lives, a la Pulp Fiction (with the exception of Vincent, of course). Personally, I find Pulp Fiction easily watchable, but ultimately its fluff embelished with cool, funny dialogue and situations. As a work of art, I find Reservoir Dogs to be the better film.

  7. #27
    I love Thelma and Louise. I'm not a good movie critic but I'm a human woman and I love that movie. I'd love it even if Brad Pitt didn't make his first-ever smoking hot entry into my consciousness, leaving me shouting "Don't turn it off! I want to read the credits! WHO is that slimy lil smokin' hot cowboy!?!"

    I was hoping to have the chance to thank Susan Sarandon for that movie at the rally this year. If she had never contributed one other wonderful movie (which she has), she did her part for humanity with Miss Louise. Just as her husband did with Duchesne in Shawshank Redemption.

    Oooohhhh, Shawshank. You guys need to watch that one too!

    If I were doing a Tarantino movie (I'm not a huge fan), I'd do Kill Bill. For a classic cheeseball movie, also Tarantino I think (he acts in it), you might consider "From Dusk Till Dawn". It's probably lacking in versimilitude but once the blood and guts are knee high, who's counting?

    I'm an expert on that one because it has Selma Hayek nearly naked. My menfolk are incapable of surfing past it...I've seen it an estimated 118 times now.

  8. #28
    Yeah, its my favourite buddy movie. I love Thelma's husband. What a knob! I saw it in the theatre when I was 18 and even I was thinkin', 'who was that hot cowboy?'. After I was finished drooling over Geena Davis. That sex scene was hawt.

    And Ridley Scott, the director... from Alien to Blade Runner, T & L, Gladiator, Black Hawk Down... he makes alot of different styles of movies! And he's not afraid of directing strong female characters.

  9. #29
    Just chimed in to this thread... a little late.

    Feel good/suicide movies are great if you can pull it off; Thelma and Louise... Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid, Dr. Strangelove (the last scene), etc. (any more)?

    On/Off topic kinda... anyone see La Femme Nakita, Jean Reno's character's introduction as 'The Cleaner' that later became 'Leon' in The Profession? Great film! Subtitles..., but he kicks it in it!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by christopher
    Continuing on this point, wouldn't the final scene bring this theme around full circle? Dressed in shorts and T-shirts, being held up by a couple of two-bit wannabe hoods, Jules has a revelation about all the bad stuff he's done, while Vincent's taking a dump. In not sharing in Jules' revelation, Vincent ultimately gets shot by Butch (Bruce Willis), by his own gun, while taking a dump. In a Shakespearian tragedy, everybody dies, a la Reservoir Dogs. In a Shakespearian comedy, almost everyone lives, a la Pulp Fiction (with the exception of Vincent, of course). Personally, I find Pulp Fiction easily watchable, but ultimately its fluff embelished with cool, funny dialogue and situations. As a work of art, I find Reservoir Dogs to be the better film.
    I'll like to have another go at this before we move on. That one character is possibly showing indications of becoming less vain and shallow by the end of the movie does almost nothing as regards my objection to the saturation of the film by characters for whom a combination of superficiality/vanity, or that and violence, are their dominant personality traits.

    Ridiculous case in point: The Wolf. The clown twins, Jules and Vincent are so lost as to how to clean up the mess caused by Vincent's extreamely unprofessional "accident" that they must contact their boss, Marcellus Wallace. Wallace solves their problem by sending "The Wolf" to orchestrate a clean up, the particulars of which any group of reasonably bright Cub Scouts could have worked out on their own. But before the bumbling duo can proceed, Vincent and The Wolf must work out which of them has rightful calim to the larger share of vanity.

    The one sequence of the film that worked for me and worked well is the one that began when Butch (Bruce Willis's character) is spotted by Marcellus on the street. Butch runs down the pedestrian Marcellus and gets T-boned in the intersection and a chase ensues that ends in a pawnshop where a bizarre sequence of events unfolds in which the two principals figure as little more than spectators until the very end. But the way the sequence ends affords about the only time we get to see the movie's characters acting with humanity and compassion. Not to mention that the dramatic element becomes compelling at the same time that Willis's character undergoes some positive development. In spite and perhaps because of, the bizarre nature of what proceeds, the sequence works very well and is the exception which proves the rule where the rest of the film is concerned.

    Betheny, I've got to say that I agree with all you said about Thelma and Louise. I don't generally notice males as sexually significant but Brad Pitt's J.D. (juvenile delinquent?) is exceptional in that he just about dripped bad boy sexiness, making the sex scene between him and Thelma that much more plausable. Of course the ending was a female rendering of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and, resoundingly, a Ridley Scott trademark but worked wonderfully for the film.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
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