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Thread: Any Help For Ischemia?

  1. #1
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    Any Help For Ischemia?

    My SCI is as a result of ischemia that took place during surgery to repair a torn aorta. Blood supply was clamped off several times for a total of 37 minutes. Also, there was compression of the T-6 and T-12. My question is: Is there research going on now that could lead to a cure for my condition? If there is something I can do to reverse or aleviate my SCI, I like to know. I realize that the majority of SCI is trauma induced and that most attention to a cure is centered on this type of SCI. Just want to know what the outlook is for me and others with similar SCI.

    Look South,
    Dixie Land

  2. #2
    Hi,
    I have asked Dr Young to respond ot your question.

    AAd

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck
    My SCI is as a result of ischemia that took place during surgery to repair a torn aorta. Blood supply was clamped off several times for a total of 37 minutes. Also, there was compression of the T-6 and T-12. My question is: Is there research going on now that could lead to a cure for my condition? If there is something I can do to reverse or aleviate my SCI, I like to know. I realize that the majority of SCI is trauma induced and that most attention to a cure is centered on this type of SCI. Just want to know what the outlook is for me and others with similar SCI.

    Look South,
    Dixie Land
    Redneck,

    I am moving this topic over to the cure forum for further discussion. Aortic clamping for 30 minutes or longer will damage the spinal cord. While there is research on the subject, it has mostly been in the area of preventing such injuries in the future. I will try to summarize the research for you.

    Wise.

  4. #4
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    My SCI is also as a result of repairing my aorto so, i'm looking forward to Dr. Young's summary.

    Redneck

    What is your injury level? Complete or Incomplete? Any return/function or feeling?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck
    My SCI is as a result of ischemia that took place during surgery to repair a torn aorta. Blood supply was clamped off several times for a total of 37 minutes. Also, there was compression of the T-6 and T-12. My question is: Is there research going on now that could lead to a cure for my condition? If there is something I can do to reverse or aleviate my SCI, I like to know. I realize that the majority of SCI is trauma induced and that most attention to a cure is centered on this type of SCI. Just want to know what the outlook is for me and others with similar SCI.

    Look South,
    Dixie Land
    Redneck. From this thread Link I investigated further, and from the company Neuralstem Inc which was involved in this study I found a CEO Blog which are thouching subject with some of your question, here is a quote from the CEO;
    I believe that the debate over stem cells will continue until we (in the industry) show real, quantifiable, important improvement in function in patients with a stem cell therapy. We of course (Neuralstem) are on record as targeting 2007 to begin our first human trials (using our spinal cord stem cells to treat Ischemic Paraplegia). Source.
    I have not found anymore info though, maybe others have or that Neuralstem Inc can be contacted due to the above quote? Hope it helps, but it would have been very interesting to know more about the human trials he talks about above here.

    Up North,
    Cold Man
    Last edited by Leif; 10-19-2006 at 04:51 AM.

  6. #6
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    I found this letter;

    Based in Rockville, Maryland, Neuralstem has a mission to cure diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) utilizing patented human neural stem cell technology developed by founding scientist Dr. Karl Johe. Major CNS diseases targeted by the Company with research programs currently underway include: ischemic spastic paraplegia, traumatic spinal cord injury, ALS, and Parkinson’s disease.

    Neuralstem’s patent-protected technology enables, for the first time, the ability to produce neural stem cells of the human brain and spinal cord in commercially reasonable quantities, and to control the differentiation of these cells into mature, physiologically relevant human neurons and glia.

    In collaboration with the University of California, San Diego, Neuralstem believes it has demonstrated compelling proof of principle data in animals for the ability to reverse the paralysis created by Ischemic Spastic Paraplegia (ISP). ISP is a form of paralysis that occurs primarily as a result of human action; it is a direct side effect of an aortic clamping procedure during a surgical operation to treat certain aneurisms.

    Neuralstem intends to complete animal studies for the ISP indication this spring and, on the basis of these studies, file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application during the summer of 2006. Upon approval of the IND, the company hopes to begin a human feasibility study/clinical trial before the end of the 2006 calendar year.
    Source.
    More.

    CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    The highest priority for Neuralstem is to prove safety and efficacy of its human neural stem cell technology in human patients. The Company anticipates its first Investigational New Drug (“IND”) application will be for the treatment of Ischemic Spastic Paraplegia (ISP). ISP is paralysis induced by the localized obstruction of arterial blood flow to the spinal cord. It is often a direct side effect of an aortic clamping procedure during a surgical operation to treat abdominal aortic aneurysm. Patients suffering from ISP are characterized by paralyzing spasticity of the legs.

    The Company has worked to optimize its tissue acquisition and regulatory consent procedures, has demonstrated that it can grow its cells in a robust and reproducible manner, and has recently demonstrated with proof of principle data that it can reverse the paralysis created in the rodent model of Ischemic Spastic Paraplegia (publication pending). In the first quarter of 2007, the Company hopes to file an investigational new drug application (IND) for its stem cell therapy, and, upon its approval, commence human clinical trials to treat patients with Ischemic Spastic Paraplegia.
    Source.

    Last edited by Leif; 10-19-2006 at 05:30 AM.

  7. #7
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    Ischemic

    Shawn: My injury level is T-6. I was able to move toes on right foot, but not now. I can flex aductor muscles in both thighs and I have topical feeling, but nothing below the skin level. I've not been told whether I am complete or incomplete.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck
    Shawn: My injury level is T-6. I was able to move toes on right foot, but not now. I can flex aductor muscles in both thighs and I have topical feeling, but nothing below the skin level. I've not been told whether I am complete or incomplete.
    Redneck,

    You sound "incomplete" to me. However, the formal definition of incomplete spinal cord injury is whether you have some level below which you have no sensation and voluntary movement. If you have no feeling around your anus and no voluntary contraction of your anal sphincter, you would be classified as an ASIA A. However, the fact that you can adduct both legs and have touch sensation well below your injury site at T6 suggests that you have significant preservation of function below the injury site. This is not unusual in people who have had ischemic injuries to their spinal cord. The rules of spinal cord injury classification are not as easily applied in people with ischemic injuries to the spinal cord or meaningful, because the damage may be widespread instead of being localized to only one level.

    The aorta provides the blood supply to the spinal cord. If you had aorta repair with a clamping time of over 30 minutes, that means that your lower spinal cord was deprived of blood for that period. In general, spinal cord gray matter (where the cells are located) are more sensitive to ischemia than white matter (where the ascending and descending tracts are located). The fact that you have preserved touch sensation is consistent with this. Pinprick or pain sensation, however, passes through the gray matter of the spinal cord and may be absent. This may account for your description of "topical" sensation without deeper sensation. Pinprick sensation is carried by the spinothalamic tract that originates from neurons in the lower spinal cord and ascends the spinal cord in the lateral columns.

    Wise.

  9. #9
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    A Typical Ischemic

    Thanks Dr. Young. My comprehension of your explanation of ischemia is that I'm pretty typical in my paraplegia. A question I have is: Does the research and experiments to cure tramatic SCI have a bearing on ischemic SCI? Also, Leif, I appreciate the info on the Maryland corporation. I plan to contact them for additional information. Shawn, I will let you know if I get a response from Maryland.

    Keep Rolling,
    Phil Durt

  10. #10
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    Thanx. I'm diagnosed as being a T10 incomplete paraplegic. I have feeling/sensation below my injury level. I can move my toes downwards on both feet. On my right foot, i can move it slightly upwards as well. I've also got some calf muscle return as well as some on my quadriceps/thighs. With this, i'm able to stand with crutches and even walk but, my knees go badly into hyper-extension so my doctor said i should use my wheelchair more often instead.

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