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Thread: Hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury in rabbit spinal cord ischemia

  1. #1

    Hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury in rabbit spinal cord ischemia

    Hepatocyte growth factor apparently increases capillary density in gray matter and reduced spinal cord edema, preventing ischemic damage to the spinal cord. The results are quite impressive with 8 out of 9 pre-treated rabbits showing normal motor function. This may very well be an interesting treatment to give to people before spinal cord surgery or transplantation of cells.

    [*] Shi E, Jiang X, Kazui T, Washiyama N, Yamashita K, Terada H and Bashar AH (2006). Nonviral gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury after spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 132: 941-7. OBJECTIVE: Paraplegia caused by spinal cord ischemia remains a serious complication after surgical repair of thoracoabdminal aortic aneurysms. Hepatocyte growth factor is a potent angiogenic and neurotrophic factor. We sought to investigate the neuroprotective effect of gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor on spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. METHODS: Human hepatocyte growth factor expression plasmid was combined with hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector containing the hepatocyte growth factor gene was injected intrathecally into the experimental rabbits, whereas control vector or saline was given to the control animals. Five days later, spinal cord ischemia was induced by means of infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Hind-limb motor function was assessed during a 14-day recovery period with Tarlov criteria. RESULTS: Human hepatocyte growth factor was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid 3 days after gene transfer, and the level peaked on day 5. Compared with the control animals, hepatocyte growth factor gene transfer significantly increased the capillary density in the gray matter and decreased the spinal cord edema. All rabbits pretreated with saline or control vector had hind-limb paraplegia (Tarlov score = 0) 14 days after spinal cord ischemia. However, previous transfection of the hepatocyte growth factor gene remarkably enhanced the Tarlov scores, and 8 of the 9 rabbits showed normal motor function (Tarlov score = 5) after a 14-day recovery period. Histologic examination showed that the intact motor neurons were preserved to a much greater extent in the rabbits transfected with the hepatocyte growth factor gene. CONCLUSION: Gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor attenuates neurologic injury after spinal cord ischemia. First Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan. tkazui@hama-med.ac.jp http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=17000308

  2. #2
    Dr. Young, do you think there maybe a role or application for aqueous oxygen (AO) to help reduce ischemia in SCI? It appears to be succesful in the treatment of acute MI's. I know this is a little off the topic of the article but the ischemia comment reminded me of the AO articles.
    Wildwilly

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by wildwilly
    Dr. Young, do you think there maybe a role or application for aqueous oxygen (AO) to help reduce ischemia in SCI? It appears to be succesful in the treatment of acute MI's. I know this is a little off the topic of the article but the ischemia comment reminded me of the AO articles.
    Wildwilly
    Willy, I don't know about aqeous oxygen. However, I must say that I am not convinced that the chronically injured spinal cord is ischemic, unless it is tethered or compressed, in which case the solution is the untether and decompress. Many studies have been carried out with hyperbaric oxygenation and there evidence that it restores function is minimal.

    This is the first report that I have seen concerning a beneficial effect of hepatic growth factor on spinal cord injury. II am thinking that, as neuroprotective therapy, hepatic growth factor might be very useful as a pretreatment for spinal cord surgery or transplantation. I also wonder if it has any effect on neural stem cells, bone marrow stem cells, or umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    Wise.

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    To our benefit

    ....and this is why I believe a cure will be found.

    Many concentrate on their personal expertise in researching which is critically important, but considering the complex nature of the injury, someone needs to look at a more comprehensive picture to find potential interactions and facilitators, the best combination treatment….

    I am thankful that we have a great communicator who chooses to continue surveying all neurological literature to consider every potential angle for impact on the present and future of research for SCI treatment. The ability to direct your own research while considering everyone’s research and to factor the political feasibility in order to stay viable demonstrates an incredible commitment to our cause.

    The gift of CareCure is the number of diverse individuals with diverse strengths who are also totally committed to a cure …and all work diligently in their areas of strength…. and together, I believe, these efforts define the complexity of the goal and ultimately, achieve the goal.

    Sorry to hijack, but sometimes it seems to me, the article is greater than the sum of its parts.

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