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Thread: How do I pick him up

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Broaddus, Texas
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    How do I pick him up

    On more than one occasion in three years my husband has fallen or slipped or just didn't make it thru transfer. In cases like that I am fortunate to have neighbors to come help me. But last night he slid off the edge of the bed and I couldn't hold him nor could I get him up. I tried everything I could think of. Finally moved the furniture and took his mattress on the floor. I wrestled him on to it and then called for help. Just happens that I had gotten a lift for my mom and they brought it over and we picked him up.

    Do any of you have suggestions? He is a quad. I tried tying a sheet around him, transferring him in levels, like on to ottoman, then up to something higher, transfer board, straight back chair.

  2. #2
    Shabu, Good question!

    I'm going to lock this here and copy it over to 'Care'.

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  3. #3
    Sounds like you have great neighbors, but in the middle of the night, that may be a problem. MyY Dad had the same issue with my Mom,during the day there are neighbors, but at night- who to turn to. He contacted the local fire station, they were willing to come over occasionnaly to assist with getting my Mom back to bed even in a non emergency. The other thing he did was to have an in between stage to get my Mom halfway up to the bed level (a short childs chair) then he could get her to the bed height easier. Hope this helps.

    JM

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    kenmore wa
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    A cpr class I took suggested using a straight back kitchen chair. You lay the chair on its back along side the person, move the person onto the chair so their behind is on the seat of the chair, their back is on the back of the chair and their legs then go over the end of the chair. Using the back legs of the chair as a fulcrum you lift the chair into a seated position. then transfer to the wheelchair or bed. You need to be careful about the person's legs when you lift the chair up so they don't get caught. Worked for us pretty smoothly.

  5. #5
    i transfer independently, but many years ago i got a lift for emergencies. i've used it about 3-4 times in 12 years, but each time i was glad it was there. with it, any person can get me off the floor and back in the chair in 5 mins. if you get a lift, you must be sure it can lift from the floor. most hoyers are meant for bed-chair transfers. a lift that can get you off the floor is stronger and a bit larger to resist the increased leverage.

    it's two parts, i keep it under the bed flat or in my basement.

    i consider it an insurance policy.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    I use a hoyer lift for Jim everyday. Yes, I can do the transfer and we do occassionally but you do have to think of your back long term. We have the original kind of hoyer-chrome, that comes apart for travel. It can lift from floor level, all you would have to do is roll him onto the net, and use the appropriate bar for floor lifts. I hope you are both doing okay, when it happened to me, I felt like such a dip, but hell, that's gravity for you! You sure did the right thing getting some padding under him. Debra

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Thank you all for your suggestions. I tried most of them and think I settled on "borrowing" the lift I just got for my moms caregiver. They are a couple of blocks away and I just practiced putting it in and out of the van. I also took the 4" pad off his bed as that may have been part of the problem. Was greating getting him out of bed but may have been too high getting him back.

  8. #8
    Member mjhopper's Avatar
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    Aug 2003
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    Clearwater, Florida
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    You may want to invest in a Hoyer lift... we rented one for a few months but decided to buy one through our local medical supply company. My husband uses to lift me from my easy chair to the bed. A few times the Hoyer has come in handy when for some reason I've slipped out of my chair while transferring. It's very easy to pick up someone off the floor using the Hoyer.

    MJ

  9. #9
    Shabu,

    I suggest strongly that you get a lift. Even with two people well trained to move a person, there is a high incidence of back strain. You should really protect your back.

    Wise.

    • Ulin SS, Chaffin DB, Patellos CL, Blitz SG, Emerick CA, Lundy F and Misher L (1997). A biomechanical analysis of methods used for transferring totally dependent patients. SCI Nurs. 14: 19-27. University of Michigan Center for Ergonomics, Ann Arbor, USA. Lifting and transferring patients have been identified as frequent precipitating factors or causes of low back problems among nurses. This study systematically evaluated six different transfer methods (three manual and three mechanical) completed by two female nurses working as a team to transfer two totally dependent patients (heavy, 95 kg and light, 56 kg). The patient transfers were completed on a rehabilitation unit of a large university hospital. Each transfer was videotaped and the short (150 cm) and tall (178 cm) nurse each performed the lead and assist roles using all six methods for both patients for a total of 24 transfers. A biomechanical software program referred to as the "3-Dimensional Static Strength Prediction Program (3DSSPPTM)" was used to model each patient transfer, and to compute the peak compressive force on the L5/S1 disc, as well as estimate the percent of the population with sufficient strength capability to transfer patients. The results of biomechanical analysis revealed that the low back compression forces exceeded the back compression design limit recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (3400N). For the manual transfer methods peak compressive forces greater than 10,000 N were predicted, which far exceeded the NIOSH upper limit of 6400 N. When mechanical lift devices were used, the back compression forces were below the back compression design limits. This study reinforces the need to utilize a mechanical lift device when transferring totally dependent patients with only two nurses.

  10. #10
    if its an emergency, you can always call 911 and ask for the fire department. its embarrasing, but its better than breaking your back

    Even if your body cannot move, you can still think and meditate ~Dalai Lama~

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