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Thread: Coffee Roasting

  1. #11
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    Latest Coffee Delivery

    My latest order of coffees from Sweet Maria's was delivered a short time ago by UPS. I ordered five pounds and the total tab was $34.99, that's with $9.65 in shipping charges, so they're are costing me just around seven bucks a pound this way/time.

    Before ordering, I was kicking around the internet looking for guidance in blending coffees and wound up finding very little. The sites I found simply wanted to supply me with roasted coffees, but I did find a source that listed a general character for single origin coffees and it said the Brazilian coffees are characterized by "nutiness". I've always liked nutiness so, for the fun of experimentation in blending, I ordered a pound each of two Brazilian coffees, The coffees of Peru are considered as having an almost identical flavor profile with those of Brazil, possibly because the two S. American states are almost contiguous and at the same latitude, so, as Tom Owen (owner and coffee securing journeyman of Sweet Maria's) was offering a freshly secured Peruvian at a good price, I ordered two pounds of that.

    Then, to round the order out, I ordered a pound of a new Ethiopian coffee.

    The coffees with their "cupping" characteristics, as reviewed by Tom Owen, are listed below:

    1. Two pounds of Peru Norte Especial.
    Velvety body, a balanced sweetness, caramelly, a
    "classic" flavor profile.

    2. A pound of Brazil Fazenda Boa Sorte Natural Bourbon.
    Rustic fruited undertones with bittersweet chocolate,low acidity.

    3. A pound of Brazil Fazenda Brauna Flatbean •
    Honey aroma, maltey sweetness in the cup with orange hints,
    medium body, makes sweet espresso.

    4. A pound of Ethiopia Organic Idido Misty Valley

    Outrageous floral, fruit and citrus character; jasmin, lemon, spice.

    Regarding the fourth entry, I can't wait to be outraged.

    I'll be subjecting the coffees to the Stove Top Roasting* process and will keep you/this updated as I go/roast.

    *Post #1 from this thread &

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showpos...9&postcount=48
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 01-28-2007 at 10:32 PM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  2. #12
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    2 Roasts for Contrast and...

    ..evalustion of technique.

    Alright, I'm going to recap some details of the last two days two stove-top roasting sessions and do it here in the home thread.


    Latest Coffee Roasting Session
    Four hours ago I compleated another stove-top coffee roasting session using one of the four new coffees from the order that arrived three days ago.*

    I selected the Ethiopia Organic Idido Misty Valley and roasted over a half pound of it. Tom, the owner of Sweet Maria's*, recommended the roast level of City Roast to get this profile in the finished beans:

    Quote:
    Outrageous floral, fruit and citrus character; jasmin, lemon, spice.


    I'll not go into the roasting experience here as it's described in depth elsewhere in my coffee posts except to say that the occurance of second crack followed an unusually long delay after the compleation of first crack... and you may read about the general stove-top process here:
    http://sweetmarias.com/stovepopmethod.html

    Of course anyone wanting to do home coffee roasting can simply use a hot-air corn popper ourdoors or invest in a home-roasting appliance. There's advice on the use and modifications (unnecessary for outdoor use) of poppers and a wealth of dedicated appliances at S.M.'s

    http://www.sweetmarias.com/

    http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.roastkits.shtml


    *http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthr...t=69759&page=2
    Early this morning I did another, the Brazil Fazenda Boa Sorte Natural Bourbon, but I'm going to have to introduce some roasting terms and thier meanings before going any further. The green coffee I pan roasted this morning comes in a ziplock bag with the Coffee name, recommended roast and characteristics at the recommended roast level. That roast level is "Full City". The Ethiopia Organic Idido Misty Valley I roasted yesterday had a recommended roast level (Tom does sample roasts with his small commercial roaster to determine ideal roast or range of roasts and includes them with the coffees free of charge) of "City".

    City is about as light a roast as any roaster would want to go and is a tricky level to reach for the stove-top roaster, as the occurance of "second crack" may not have developed when the beans have reached "City" and the second crack is something most stove-top roasters come to expect as part of the roast routine to tell them that they are nearing compleatlion.

    I failed to stop yesterday's roast at the City level (as a quick visit with the Sweet Maria's website made plain in living color) but what I achieved, "Full City" proved useful to me in this mornings effort. The Brazil....Bourbon I roasted this AM had a roast recommendation of "Full City", so I put half a cup of yesterday's Ethiopia...Misty Valley in good light to my right for easy reference while I brought the Brazilian Bourbon to a Full City roast.

    Even with the correctly roasted coffee right there for reference, I slightly underroasted the new beans, but I'm very close to a prefect Full City hue.

    Notes on these pictures: All these were taken with my Nikon camera the exact same distance away, but I had trouble with low lighting and used a fill-in flash, which makes some pictures have more highlights/glare. It makes all the roasts look lighter and more red-yellow color saturated than they would if you where standing right beside me looking at the coffee samples at the time. That Fresh Roast would look much darker to your naked eye. The coffee is Organic/FT Guatemala Huehuetenango from the Asobagri Co-op, 2002 - it roasted a bit more uneven than a current crop wet-processed coff

    I've been noticing something very gratifying about my roasts lately, they're improving. It makes sense that "practice makes perfect"...is an overstatement but it does give a chance for improvement and my roasts have become much more uniform while my ability to control the final roast level has improved considerably. There's nobody else around so I'd pat myself on the back if my arm weren't so sore. Kidding, anybody with two good arms can do this kind of roasting and you don't have to do it manually, there are tools.


    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-01-2007 at 07:40 AM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  3. #13
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    Wink

    I'm adding these excerpts of a review of a Yemen Mocha coffee*,

    It's intense, layered, and rustic. And it needs to be roasted toi the verge of 2nd crack, or into it. I went back and did a real Vienna roast, letting the 2nd crack start but not letting it get rolling. It was fantastic too. More black licorice in this cup, and more baker's chocolate. Anyway, the whole experience put me in a quandry: buy a coffee I know is old, but, with the right roast, has an amazing cup. I decided to go for it because I know, while this is not for everyone, those who like this flavor profile might have momentary coffee nirvana with this lot from Bani Matar. And that is why I put the recommended roast in the name "FC+"
    In all, it's not a coffee I want to drink every single day ... it's too much. And I also feel like the resting time after roasting is going to play a big role in the cup experience. Oddly, I really enjoyed this initially with a very short 6 hour rest, although the body wasn't quite filled out yet. Next day, around 14 hour rest, it had the thick body that pairs so well with this intense, dense cup character.

    http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.ar...html#mattariFC

    ..by Tom to illustrate some complex things about the relationship of both roast and rest times to coffee flavor.

    Can this guy sell his coffees, or what (and nice to see someone else making typos). Now I'm gonna have to order some of this Mocha and then, when the new crops have come in and Tom's sampled and bought some, Kenya. Pretty soon I'm gonna have to take some of my roasts down to Main St to see if I can't get some of the local shops interested just to handle the overflow.

    *
    Yemen Mokha Mattari Full City+
    http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.ar...html#mattariFC

    P.S. I ordered five pounds of this premium mocha coffee which arrived yesterday (1/31/07). Today I roasted a small batch to just beyond a Full City+ stage. Tomorrow it will have been resting long enough to get a pretty full appreciation of what the cup has to deliver.
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-01-2007 at 11:21 PM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  4. #14
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    Make mine a light roast ...,. I am a coffee lightweight. Actually, its probably that I've never had decent french roast.

  5. #15
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    It's probable that you've rarely if ever had the combination of truly fresh coffee, roasted from one of about sixty varietals carefully and discriminatingly choosen by a coffee connoisseur who makes an annual global search for the best coffees of each peak harvest season and bids high to secure them for his Internet website. Of course I'm refering to Tom Owen of Sweet Maria's.

    Then, of course, you would either have to secure some of these excellent green coffees from Sweet Maria's and apply as expert a roast to them as possible, to bring them to the highest point of readiness to be ground and brewed into some of the most exquisite coffees on planet Earth, or you would have to have someone do those things for you.
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-01-2007 at 08:21 AM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  6. #16
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    Po Mouth for Tom

    My dark side has been kicking up a storm for a while now and I'm going to allow it some expression where Tom, the owner/operator of Sweet Maria's Internet business is concerned. There will be no slander here so Tom, if by some extreamely long shot you are monitoring, relax.

    I have singing the praises of Sweet Maria's and it's owner for over a year in various posts/threads in this forum and it's high time to expose a flip, although not necessaarily contradictory, side. Tom Owen stretches the truth, sometimes to what I consider to be the breaking point.

    The first glaring bone of contention I encountered being expoused by Tom was that extended periods of green coffee roasting, periods approaching and exceeding twenty minutes, would produce a vastly inferior roast. This was comparing such roasts to those done in less than ten munutes, which was the time in which all the small electric roasters he was offering at the time did them. This time got extended somewhat after Tom added some larger, more expensive roasters to his line which took somewhat longer to compleate a roast.

    To be continued:
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-01-2007 at 08:20 AM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  7. #17
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    Latest Order and Unexpected Roast Achievement

    After posting the excerpts from the Sweet Maria's notes on the unique Yemen Mokha Mattari, I ordered five pound of that plus two of a very nice Nicaragua and one pound of their $16 Panama Hacienda La Esmerslda Gesha. http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.ce...enAuctionLot06. The order arrived four days ago and I did my first roast of six ounces of the Mokha, three days ago. That roast took twelve minutes and came out very close to my goal. It is just as wonderful and intense as Tom's review indicated it might be. http://sweetmarias.com/coffee.arabia...html#mattariFC

    Yesterday morning/afternoon I roasted a half pound of the Peru Norte Especial from my next-to-last order with a target roast level of City+ (see bean color images above).

    I made a major varriation of my roasting setup/technique and it paid huge dividends. I preheated my big, flat-bottomed wok on a stove range before switching to my lap-placed hot plate and I upped my heatgun (suspended above) setting by almost 100 degrees F. and lowered it, closer to the beans.

    I noticed the greater rapidity of the roasting process within the first two+ minutes as the coffee beans turned yellow (from light khaki) and then entered frist crack right at the four and a half minute mark. The target roast was City + and I finished the roast in just under six minutes right on target and with a completely even roast.

    I have been experimenting with the stove-top roasting technique for less than a year now and I never dreamed that I could reach the degree of speed, uniformity and accuracy of roast level that I achieved yesterday. According to Tom Owen of Sweet Maria's website/Internet business, what I did is theoretically impossible for a stove-top roaster*. And I am confident that I knew exactly what I was doing and can do it again, and again, whenever I want.

    The insights of this experience are these: I can reduce my overall stovetop roast times to less than half what they have previously been; I can produce completely even/uniform roasts and I can finish with targeted roast levels of an accuracy, previously not even on the horizon of my expectations. The shortened roast time does recquire an increased physical effort to compensate for the greater rapidity of roasting but the net effort is still greatly reduced to the point where multiple roasts would be possible in the same day, were it my desire to do them. Another insight is that I will not be considering going back to the use of a coffee roasting appliance since I can live with the chaff and the much greater roast volumes that stovetop roasting accomodates as compared with all but the largest/most costly appliances.

    I attribute the degree of success of my stovetop roasting technique to the combination of heats from below and above. By nearly maximizing the heat from the heatgun and preheating the wok, I'm supplying an intense, even heat which, in combination with the rapid aggitation of the wok on the hotplate burner, allows great speed and uniformity of roast. By having become increasingly familiar with the target colors of finished roasts, I have become able to know better and better when to terminate a roast to arrive on target. Experience, effort and experimentation have paid off in an unexpected and unanticipated level of achievement.

    *Tom does allow that he has an acquaintance who claims to be able to do this using the stovetop roasting technique. I tend to believe the claims of this individual now, having experienced them myself.
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 02-09-2007 at 01:08 PM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  8. #18
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    Two Roasts in a Day

    My afternoon's been a busy one with the first effort to produce two roasts on the same day. As the full daylight period of early to mid afternoon is best for the stovetop roasting method I employ, I did the two back to back in about a one and a half hour period.

    Since having such success with it a week ago, I continued the modifications to my roasting arrangement and technique with both roasts and with equally gratifying results. I did a large volume of the Peru Norte Especial aiming for the City+ roast level again and I did a kingsized batch of my new Panama Hacienda La Esmeralda Gesha, a very premium coffee that sells at a premium price. The Esmeralda Gesha has a recommended roast of City.

    The Peru Norte Especial went first at just around noon and, with a clear glass bottle of last week's roast of it on the stove beside me, I was able to finish with a City+ roast hue so well matched that I could not tell them apart. The trickiest part of producing a roast this precise is choosing when to remove the beans from the heat to begin the cooling process; the beans will always continue roasting a bit until they are cooled below the level where this happens.

    With the Panama Esmeralda Gesha I was aiming at a slightly lighter hue to attain the City level recommended and, as near as I can tell, have achieved just that. While there is a bean to bean degree of unevenness that was not present in the previous two batches (roasts) I attribute this to the particular roasting characteristics of the Esmeralda Gesha as my peparations and technique were the same as for the Peru Especial. I did cull two beans (the roast consisted of literally thousands of beans) which were strangely under-roasted but Tom tells us that such variation and particular peculiarities will be found in some coffees and are nothing to be concerned about. This special coffee will be fully ready for brewing and cupping by early tomorrow and I'm enjoying a happy anticipation of what it can deliver. It's a coffee that would sell roasted for about forty bucks a pound, if you could find it.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  9. #19
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    Roasting Etc.

    After a long hiatus occasioned by my switch to various teas as my main daily caffeinated drink, I did a roast about ten days ago. I roasted the last of my Brazilian Bourbon coffee and I dropped the heatgun's nozzle to within two inches from the green beans and dialed the heat to max at 1100 degrees F. With the wok preheated on the stove range (much hotter than my antique hotplate) I was able to finish the roast at full city (see color plates in post #12) in less than seven minutes.

    As another CC member can attest, this is a coffee well worth the brewing and cupping.

    Here's an interesting bit from the website of my supplier, Sweet Maria's, about a coffee that comes through a South American bird :

    Once ingested, the Jacu Bird, eliminates the digested beans which lie on the ground under the coffee trees. Our staff collects these odorless droppings, transports them to the drying areas where they are dried, cleaned and stored in their parchment for up to three months." Note his comment: the coffee comes out of the Jacu in parchment, not as hulled green bean. While Kopi Luwak cups like low grade industrial robusta, the Jacu Bird coffee has a good mild Brazil specialty-level cup. Understand me: I am not saying this has some crazy cup character; it is a nice cup resulting from a very unique, er, process. The dry fragrance has a soft nutty sweetness to it, while the wet aromatics has a bit of mollasses and brown bread. There is a slight black pepper note in the finish.
    http://sweetmarias.com/prod.greencoffee.mvc.shtml

    Brazil Jacu Bird Coffee

    Sweet Maria's stocks a little of this coffee and has it priced at twelve bucks a pound or around double what most of their South American coffees go for. I think I'll pass and maybe invest in some:

    Brazil Minas Gerais Competition -3rd Place...the cup is excellent! The dry fragrance has vivid fruited notes, sweet natural honey, and hazelnut. Add water and the wet aromatics have an orangey note, jasmine tea, and unfiltered honey. Between the aromatics of the grounds and wet brew, you have a pretty good idea what is coming in the cup; silky sweet herbal, floral and honey notes, with a slight citrus hint. It sounds like a description that could be applied to Ethiopia coffees, but overall we are talking about the Brazil tonal range; in the scheme of things this is still a low-acid, full body coffee with in a mildly rustic hue. But put it beside another brazil, especially one we might say typifies a "good solid blend base" and this coffees unique nuances are dramatic and distinct.
    Last edited by Juke_spin; 06-29-2007 at 04:09 AM.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  10. #20
    STOP!!!!
    You are killing me!!!
    Can I live next door to you???
    I wont say what a good coffee does to me & yours looks so good I can almost taste it .... I'm almost licking the screen..
    Have tried so many brands of coffee here but so far none outstanding.
    I'm drolling over your pictures & wishing for a .... nice cup of mokha right now.
    I might try to roast the" arabica " that is available here.

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