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Thread: Biang Biang Noodles

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by chak
    Has anyone been to Hong Kong and tried their noodles? Noodles houses there serve "hofan", a kind of noodle with same color(as Biang biang) but its width is between Biang Biang and Mi Mien. Basically its the ingredients that you put that makes the taste the so called hofan is tasteless but its texture is soft and smooth.
    Although I have been in Hong Kong for nearly 3 months, I must say that I have not yet encountered a single restaurant that offers biang biang mian. I have looked in Shanghai and Beijing as well. Many Chinese have no idea what biang biang mian is This is something of a fancy of Americans, I am beginning to think. Almost every Chinese person I have met did not know how to write biang and some even doubt that the character is real, even in Xi'an. I asked my young colleagues at the Giaotong Hospital in Xi'an and they couldn't come up with the character.

    But, I must say that I have had real biang biang mian in Xi'an. It costs about ¥68 in an expensive restaurant and one dish can serve 6 people. Throw in a couple orders of dumplings (which Xi'an is also famous for), a few vegetable dishes, a half a dozen quarts of bitter melon beer (ku kwa 苦瓜, a green beer made by Tsingdao) for ¥2 per quart, you can easily satisfy a party of half a dozen hungry people for ¥100 (about US$12). In my opinion, this is one of the best food values in the world.

    Wise.

  2. #22

    Ban Mian Recipe

    I found in my noodle cook book a recipe for "Ban Mian". I am not sure if it is similar with Biang Biang Mian, but the method of making rather unusual, the dough is soaked in water for 1-2 hours before press and flatten.

    Here is the recipe :
    300 g plain flour
    1 egg
    2 T oil
    150 ml water
    1t salt

    Combine flour and other ingredients. Knead lightly until form a smooth dough. Cut dough into small pieces or cubes. Soak them in cool water for at least 1-2 hours.

    Remove dough from water (by this time it would be watery and soft), dust with more flour so won't stick to your hands. Press and flatten with rolling pin or pasta maker. Cut into 3cm wide long strips (or if you prefer, may cut each strip into 5cm long). Drop noodle into boiling water and cook until done (1-2 minutes). Dish out, place into serving bowl, pour in hot chicken broth, serve with stir fried minced pork, blanched Chinese white cabbage (shredded), green onion and drizzle with some fried shallots and chili oil/flakes

    Bon-appetite.

    Netti

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hendra
    I found in my noodle cook book a recipe for "Ban Mian". I am not sure if it is similar with Biang Biang Mian, but the method of making rather unusual, the dough is soaked in water for 1-2 hours before press and flatten.

    Here is the recipe :
    300 g plain flour
    1 egg
    2 T oil
    150 ml water
    1t salt

    Combine flour and other ingredients. Knead lightly until form a smooth dough. Cut dough into small pieces or cubes. Soak them in cool water for at least 1-2 hours.

    Remove dough from water (by this time it would be watery and soft), dust with more flour so won't stick to your hands. Press and flatten with rolling pin or pasta maker. Cut into 3cm wide long strips (or if you prefer, may cut each strip into 5cm long). Drop noodle into boiling water and cook until done (1-2 minutes). Dish out, place into serving bowl, pour in hot chicken broth, serve with stir fried minced pork, blanched Chinese white cabbage (shredded), green onion and drizzle with some fried shallots and chili oil/flakes

    Bon-appetite.

    Netti
    I sincerely thank you for taking the time to transcribe the above recipie for me but I have real reservations about attempting to make noodles from it. A big one stems from Wise's comment that the Biang Biang nooldes of Xi'an are probably based on mung bean flour. Then there is the problem of the noodles of your reicpie calling for "regular flour" as there is only a convention of "regular flour" and I'm unfamiliar with the convention in this case. The last and biggest problem I have with the recipie is its calling for soaking small pieces of lightly kneaded dough in cool water for one or more hours. I have a great deal of difficulty imagining doing anything effective with pieces of wet stickey dough; it's daunting.

    Since Wise's description and pictures of some of the variations of Biang Biang Mien make clear the central role of sauces and various condiments to the final dish, I'll just rack this one up as a semi-errotic, exotic fantasy of a meal. Some things are better tasted through the veil of imagination.

    Thanks, anyway, Netti.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
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    5,197
    Jukes, heres a good one, its a fish laksa. It satisfies your vegetarian requirement and can be made with any type of noodles. Its a dish that can be attempted by a beginner, even i can make it. (chillies required!)
    New recipe of the week: Malaysian fish laksa


    A popular way to enjoy noodles throughout Asia is to add them to richly-flavored soups. This bulks out the soup and turns it into a meal in itself instead of simply being an appetizer. Noodle soups are particularly popular in Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia and Malaysia. This week's featured recipe is a Malaysian noodle soup called laksa. There are many varieties of laksa, but fish, seafood and chicken laksas are the most popular.
    This fish laksa is particularly healthful because it contains oily fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids which help reduce the risk of heart disease and many other chronic conditions.



  5. #25
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by IanTPoulter
    Jukes, heres a good one, its a fish laksa. It satisfies your vegetarian requirement and can be made with any type of noodles. Its a dish that can be attempted by a beginner, even i can make it. (chillies required!)


    Thanks, Ian. I've copied and printed the recipe and will soon order a few of the less locally available items online. I understand the value of using the mackerel or swordfish specified in the recipie but may substitute coho salmon (I've a freezer full of it); of the two oily fish, swordfish is expensive and mackerel is rarely available here. It looks to be a very spicey dish with a multitude of flavors.
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  6. #26
    There is a guy by the name of Prince Roy who apparently lives (lived?) in India but travels extensively in China and has written some of the most worshipful and detailed articles on internet concerning Chinese noodles. Here is one where he not only details a particular Sichuan noodle called sh*o 绍子面 and describes substitute commercial noodles from Taiwan (http://www.princeroy.org/?p=219).

    These are of course not biang biang noodles, illustrated from another blog http://theabc.typepad.com/my_weblog/2006/04/index.html

    The expression on the girl's face is universal.

    This topic has convinced me that I need to take a picture of every interesting dish that I have eaten in China. While I have taken some pictures of very unusual dishes (such as bamboo grubs and fried wasps, below), I hadn't thought of taking pictures of biang biang noodles. The picture below is of my colleague Dongming Sun about to put a fried bamboo grub (dish on lower right) in his mouth and a neurosurgeon at Kunming. The interesting looking dish with characters on it and the red pepper sticking out is almost 90% chile pepper and 10% other ingredients.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 09-24-2006 at 12:44 PM.

  7. #27
    In Guangzhou, I once had a bowl of live shrimp. It is impossible to show what it looks like in a still photo and I have constructed an animated gif from three sequential photos, showing the movement. Since it is sort of gruesome, I have put it into the Member's Forum.
    http://sci.rutgers.edu/forum/showthread.php?t=69646

    Wise.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 09-24-2006 at 02:36 PM.

  8. #28
    Wise, please don't ever post pictures of fried worms again.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by antiquity
    Wise, please don't ever post pictures of fried worms again.
    Sorry... And please don't click the link for the shrimps.

    Wise.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Sorry... And please don't click the link for the shrimps.

    Wise.
    Too late.

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