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Thread: Biang Biang Noodles

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cass
    too bad ian. tho my work pc picks this up and i didn't load any fonts. how old is your work pc?
    Cass, its pretty modern but I think I have a very bare bones operating system. As I work (well I get paid for doing nothing really) at an institution that is extremely sensitive about industrial espionage I am unable to download anything at all onto my PC

  2. #12
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    Now back to my favourite topic, asian food. Has anyone had Nonja cooking? A cross between Chinese and malay cuisine, I got hooked on this in the 70's.
    http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issu...winds.meet.htm
    Nonya cooking is the result of blending Chinese recipes and wok cooking techniques with spices and ingredients used by the local Malay community. The food is tangy, aromatic, spicy and herbal.

  3. #13
    Dr. Young,

    I am Indonesian of Chinese descend. My Chinese tutor from China (Fu Jian province) never see this word or heard about it. She said it could be a phrase which words then put together to form a symbol. The noodle look like Wonton skin but thicker. It should not be difficult to make if have pasta maker. I lived in United States for 6 years, but trips to China really astounded me. It is certainly a vast country. Their public places really huge. I never see so many people gather in one place.

    Hello Ian,
    Are you craving for NYONYA food? I live around Nyonya food (read NYA as in SONYA). What can I do for you ? Nyonya food came from earlier Chinese settlers in Southeast Asia, mainly Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. It is a melting pot between Chinese and Malay food as the first Chinese settler mix marriages with local. But subsequent generations retain its Chinese roots as more influx of Chinese immigrants coming in. My great grandparents and grandparents could be the last influx of Chinese immigrant, they came around 1930's.

    Netti

  4. #14
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    hey Netti, masakan kegitu memang candaku. Waktu saya tingal di maylaysia dan Indo dulu, saya makan setiap hari. Tapi tidak kurang lagi di australia , isteri saya pandai masak makanan kegitu.
    Netti , hope you dont mind me excercising my bahasa, its been a while.
    I would eat that type of cooking every day if I could.

  5. #15

    Wink

    Dear Ian,

    It is my pleasure. Hope you don't mind I make some correction : Kegitu (begitu), Candaku (kegemaranku/kesukaanku). The rest are perfect Bahasa.

    Excuse my geography. Where is The Antipodes ? (maafkan geography saya, dimana Antipodes ?)

    Nett..

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hendra
    Dear Ian,

    It is my pleasure. Hope you don't mind I make some correction : Kegitu (begitu), Candaku (kegemaranku/kesukaanku). The rest are perfect Bahasa.

    Excuse my geography. Where is The Antipodes ? (maafkan geography saya, dimana Antipodes ?)

    Nett..
    Antipodes=Australia, thank you for the corrections. I returned your PM.

  7. #17

    Smile Indian recipes

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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hendra
    Dr. Young,

    I am Indonesian of Chinese descend. My Chinese tutor from China (Fu Jian province) never see this word or heard about it. She said it could be a phrase which words then put together to form a symbol. The noodle look like Wonton skin but thicker. It should not be difficult to make if have pasta maker. I lived in United States for 6 years, but trips to China really astounded me. It is certainly a vast country. Their public places really huge. I never see so many people gather in one place. Netti
    Hello Netti, I've been waiting for someone to come up with a recipie for biang biang mian or the biang biang noodles since Dr Wise started teasing me with this thread.

    I have an extrusion (powered) type pasta maker which can make wide noodles. Can/would you tell me how to make biang biang noodles and biang biang mian (maybe they're the same thing?).
    "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
    J.B.S.Haldane

  9. #19
    Juke,

    Here is a close-up picture of the biang biang mian. It is served in a big dish and everybody fills up a bowl of the stuff, often very spicy. This is from a great site that describes the special food of the shaanxi province (where Xi'an is):


    A bowl of Biang Biang Mian being served from a big dish


    The noodles come with beans, spice, and all sorts of other stuff.

    Here is another picture of biang biang mian from a Chinese web site:
    http://www.byonline.net/new/article_sh.asp?id=5462

    This is actually the way it looks like at the restaurants where I have eaten it.


    But there are many other kinds of noodles in Xi'an which I consider the noodle capitol of the world

    These are called mi mian pi (a favorite of women because it means face complexion noodle)

    If you like hot spicy noodles, this is it

    Noodles drenched in chili oil

    Here is something that is less spicy

    Qi Shan mian

    According to one blogger, this is how it is done http://www.roboo.com/news/ChewingTheFatInXian.htm
    The noodle dough is rolled flat and pulled into long strips a couple inches wide. Imperfect squares are pulled from the strip and tossed in a big vat of boiling water. When cooked, smooth and tender, the noodles are fished out and served with ground pork, vegetables and a brown sauce with a little bit of bite.

    We talked to Zhao Jian, owner of the noodle shop at 222 Shang Jian Lu, who explained that biang biang noodles are “one of the wonders of Shaanxi,” a secret technique and recipe that hasn’t left the province since biang biang were born more than 1,000 years ago. There are a few restaurants that serve the noodle in Xi’an, but Zhao said biang biang are biggest in nearby Xianyang, where they got their start. Of course, Zhao, a Xianyang native, claims to have the best biang biang in Xi’an.
    Apparently, some noodles are good for coughs and phlegm, according to this web site:
    http://www.aaaom.org/Top%2050%20Chin...20Recipes.html
    7. Xing Ren Dao Xiao Mian (Knife noodle with Xing Ren) for stopping cough and transforming phlegm
    Apricot seed (Xing Ren) 30g
    Peanut (Hua Sheng) 100g
    White sesame (Bai Zhi Ma) 50g
    Soy Sauce 50g
    Vinegar
    Sugar
    Sesame oil
    Mix vegetable
    Salt
    Black pepper
    Olive oil
    1. Fry Xing Ren, Hua Shen, Bai Zhi Ma and crush into powder.
    Mix soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, vegetables salt and pepper together to make a sauce.
    Make dough with ingredients from steps 1 and 2, cut into small pieces and toss into boiling water.
    Function: Tonify lung Yin, stop cough and transform phlegm
    I had previously stated that biang biang mian is made from buckwheat. I am now no longer sure that this is the case. According to http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_...Pasta.html#p10
    Chinese noodles are made with a variety of ingredients. Those made from mung-bean flour, also called peastarch, are glistening white and are called bean threads, cellophane noodles, powdered silk noodles, shining noodles, or transparent noodles. Noodles made from seaweed are also called cellophane noodles. These types of noodles are very thin and hairlike.
    It may be made from mung-bean flour since it is glistening white. Buckwheat would be brownish. The Chinese that I spoke to called it pidai noodles as well. Pidai means leather belt.

    http://www.shanghaidiaries.com/gallery/shaanxi/IMG_1001 has a bunch of comments on the noodles.
    As a Chinese,I myself was surprised when I saw this character for the first time.The word "biang" can't be found in any dictionary. It doesn't exist in the standard lexicon. However,according to what I found out after a little research,it's not an artistic invention,either.This word has been passed on by word of mouth over a thousand years. It's one of the two words coined in Shaanxi province in the history of this ancient city,the other one being "•√ózhao" which was coined by Empress Wu Zetian to be used only in her name meaning "the sun and the moon are shining in the sky".The making of the charecter "biang" derived from the local folklore which tells the story of a poor student who went to the local noodle restaurant called "biang biang"(because of the sound when making the noodle) and offered to make the character when he found that he couldn't afford the noodle.He used this character to express his anger about his time. It's said that he was reciting a poem when he wrote,or more precisely,coined this character.
    Last edited by Wise Young; 09-23-2006 at 11:46 PM.

  10. #20
    Has anyone been to Hong Kong and tried their noodles? Noodles houses there serve "hofan", a kind of noodle with same color(as Biang biang) but its width is between Biang Biang and Mi Mien. Basically its the ingredients that you put that makes the taste the so called hofan is tasteless but its texture is soft and smooth.

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