Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Remylination

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    251

    Remylination

    Are there any ongoing trials involving remylination of the spinal cord?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by eagle18
    Are there any ongoing trials involving remylination of the spinal cord?
    Hi Eagle,
    Do you think that remyelination only will be the solution for you (us)?...
    G78

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by George78
    Hi Eagle,
    Do you think that remyelination only will be the solution for you (us)?...
    G78

    Eagle,

    Spacticity is a serious problem for people with "incomplete" spinal cord injury and who are walking. Are you taking any anti-spasticity drugs such as baclofen? This is often useful for reducing the "stiffness". As for the "cramping" that you describe, gabapentin (neurontin) may be helpful. I have also heard from people that swimming helps both the spasticity and spasm, at least for several hours after the swimming.

    It is also possible that you may benefit from a drug called 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). This drug is just finishing clinical trials for multiple sclerosis and previous trials suggest that this drug helps people with MS walk better and faster. Although earlier clinical trials did not show a significant effect of 4-AP on spasticity after spinal cord injury, I have known several people who have had significant relief of spasticity as a result of the drug. If so, it is the only drug that I know of which reduces spasticity without causing weakness. Although the drug is not approved by the FDA yet, it can be prescribed by a doctor and compounded by a pharmacy. It might be worth a try.

    Finally, some therapies that are or will soon be undergoing clinical trials should be helpful for regenerating and remyelinating the spinal cord. I am hopeful that these therapies would be beneficial for both complete and incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Wise.



    G78,

    This post by Dr Young was on 4/23/06. Please note the final paragraph.
    Last edited by eagle18; 09-16-2006 at 08:20 PM.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by eagle18
    Are there any ongoing trials involving remylination of the spinal cord?
    Hi Eagle,

    There are no FDA trials for chronics but the OEG transplants being offered by Lima and Huang focus on remyelination.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by eagle18
    Finally, some therapies that are or will soon be undergoing clinical trials should be helpful for regenerating and remyelinating the spinal cord. I am hopeful that these therapies would be beneficial for both complete and incomplete spinal cord injury.
    Wise.
    This post by Dr Young was on 4/23/06. Please note the final paragraph.
    ... I think it's difficult to say if spasticity is due to demyelination, this could be due to tethering of the cord or some nerve roots, don't u think?.. I'm wondering what are the progresses concerning imaging the spine (IRM...etc). Are we know able to see the myelin shield?...
    G78

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    251
    Quote Originally Posted by George78
    ... I think it's difficult to say if spasticity is due to demyelination, this could be due to tethering of the cord or some nerve roots, don't u think?.. I'm wondering what are the progresses concerning imaging the spine (IRM...etc). Are we know able to see the myelin shield?...
    G78
    Ya got me. I 'm just going on what Dr. Young said would be available as to what might help. Other than that I'm in the dark.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by antiquity
    Hi Eagle,

    There are no FDA trials for chronics but the OEG transplants being offered by Lima and Huang focus on remyelination.
    Hey Antiquity:

    This sounds a little funny to me because I thought that Lima would only work on completes. I was under the impression that if you have a complete injury remyelination alone probably wouldn't do much because of the extensive damage to the myelin and axonal structures.

    If a real solid remyelination therapy using hESC were implemented on subacute incompletes, I'm convinced we would have something, however small, to show for our efforts. If we can get this, it might convince the many sceptics to invest money in our endeavors (clinical trials)
    No one ever became unsuccessful by helping others out

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Tufelhunden
    Hey Antiquity:

    This sounds a little funny to me because I thought that Lima would only work on completes. I was under the impression that if you have a complete injury remyelination alone probably wouldn't do much because of the extensive damage to the myelin and axonal structures.

    If a real solid remyelination therapy using hESC were implemented on subacute incompletes, I'm convinced we would have something, however small, to show for our efforts. If we can get this, it might convince the many sceptics to invest money in our endeavors (clinical trials)
    Hi Tuf,

    I was in no way endorsing either Drs. treatment nor do I consider them cures. Just mentioned them because olfactory ensheathing glia are theorized to remyelinate axons. There's also 4-AP.

  9. #9
    Hi all,
    I've found that:
    Quote Originally Posted by http://serendip.brynmawr.edu
    Researchers are currently capable of removing healthy Schwann cells from human nerves. Techniques to collect greater numbers of intact Schwann cells are being studied in hopes that a human trial of transplantation will soon occur. The Myelin Project has already obtained permission for such a trial, yet before proceeding the researchers must be able to remyelinate monkey brains. A team led by Dr. Baron-Van Evercooren has had some initial success with this by transplanting the monkey's own Schwann cells into its CNS; they are now working on verifying their first attempts. There is also research looking into transplanting oligodendrocytes. Researchers have been able to generate cultures of oligodendrocyte precursors with hopes of culturing them in large enough numbers to transplant.

    Another area of research is looking into neural stem cells, self-renewing cells that can develop into various neural cells. They are very promising because they respond to local signals from the CNS, which tells them where to go and what to differentiate into. Since they are self-renewing, they could provide an endless supply of myelin for the CNS. It has also been found that cerebrospinal fluid can transport myelin-synthesizing cells to various parts of the CNS. Injecting neural stem cells into the cerebral spinal would therefore provide an agent of remyelination for the entire CNS; this is a forthcoming area of research.

    The research conducted thus far indicates that remyelination of the human central nervous system is possible in the near future.
    I guess it was posted early 2005 refering to the Myelin Project..
    I agree that remyelination of human CNS will soon be possible, Dr. Wise has always told us that this will be the first therapy available for us.. I'm concerned about falling in long never-ending human clinical trials for decades (cf. Brisbane OEG of Mc-Kay-Sim)..
    Quote Originally Posted by antiquity
    Hi Eagle,

    There are no FDA trials for chronics but the OEG transplants being offered by Lima and Huang focus on remyelination.
    I wonder what results could be with OEG transplants of Lima or Huang on MS...
    G78 :-)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by http://brain.oxfordjournals.org

    Efficient myelin repair in the macaque spinal cord by autologous grafts of Schwann cells

    Corinne Bachelin 1, François Lachapelle 1, Christelle Girard 1, Pierre Moissonnier 2, Che Serguera-Lagache 3, Jacques Mallet 3, Denys Fontaine 1, Alexandre Chojnowski 4, Eric Le Guern 4, Brahim Nait-Oumesmar 1, and Anne Baron-Van Evercooren 1*
    1 INSERM U 546, Laboratoire des Affections de la Myéline et des Canaux Ioniques Musculaires, IFRNS 70, Paris
    2 ENVA, Maison Alfort, France
    3 CNRS UMR 9923 IFRNS, Génétique Moléculaire de la Neurotransmission et des Processus Neurodégénératifs, Paris
    4 INSERM U289, Neurologie et Thérapeutique Expérimentale, Paris

    Abstract

    Summary Experimental transplantation in rodent models of CNS demyelination has led to the idea that Schwann cells may be candidates for cell therapy in human myelin diseases. Here we investigated the ability of Schwann cells autografts to generate myelin in the demyelinated monkey spinal cord. We report that monkey Schwann cells derived from adult peripheral nerve biopsies retain, after growth factor expansion and transduction with a lentiviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein, the ability to differentiate in vitro into promyelinating cells. When transplanted in the demyelinated nude mouse spinal cord, they promoted functional and anatomical repair of the lesions (n = 12). Furthermore, we obtained evidence by immunohistochemistry (n = 2) and electron microscopy (n = 4) that autologous transplantation of expanded monkey Schwann cells in acute lesions of the monkey spinal cord results in the repair of large areas of demyelination; up to 55% of the axons were remyelinated by donor Schwann cells, the remaining ones being remyelinated by oligodendrocytes. Autologous grafts of Schwann cells may thus be of therapeutic value for myelin repair in the adult CNS.

    Keywords: Schwann cell; primate; CNS; remyelination.
    .....

Similar Threads

  1. Remylination
    By foster in forum Cure
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-19-2004, 09:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •