Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: How would you design a place to live??

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    106

    How would you design a place to live??

    Seeing many threads on lack of privacy since joining this board, I am curious how this sounds to some of you:

    After going to see several living centers, supposedly designed by gimps/for/gimps, I find a common issue with them.

    Wonderful spaces, great counters/stove-tops and bathrooms along with auto doors seem great.

    However, my problem has been if I needed a PCA, I did not want them to be "in" my personal space. I know this might might sound silly, considering what they often have to do, but I mean my surroundings are wide open to any PCA coming in.
    If you have a steady PCA, this would be less of an issue, but what about the new ones? I am willing to bet that we have all had the experience of a PCA from hell that we did not trust in our home.
    (Things that PCA's have said that made me cringe: "wow, that is a nice stereo" "my, you have a lot of albums here" "do you know there is a gun on your end table?" "I think someone has moved around your living room, there are DVD's on the couch and chair" "who else lives here with you, you seem to be vulnerable" "I just got out of rehab 2 weeks ago, I cannot be around your pain medicine. I might not be able to control myself" "Hey, is that your daughter? I knew her from school" "do you know there are a bunch of coins on your table? They might be stolen if you leave them there" )

    My thought, if I were to design a home/apartment, is a special entrance for in-house help.

    Off the bedroom, an entrance one could easily grant or deny entry to a caregiver by the occupants choice. Off the bedroom, there would be the shower/bathroom including a closet for any medical supplies/medications/equipment.
    A new, or part time, PCA would be able to meet your needs without entering the rest of your domain.
    The trusted, senior aides, or your family/roomies/spouses would deal with anything needed in the rest of the house.

    I know that for someone in tiny senior housing, this would be impossible, but in many of the living centers I have seen, this would have been possible if they had been designed a little differently, using the same amount of space.

    I am curious what you all think...

    If you could, would you keep most of your aides/nurses out of your main living area?

  2. #2
    Senior Member queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Garden on the Green, Indiana
    Posts
    1,109
    I know a guad who soon after his injury went thru many, many dishonest PCA's. Finally, after finding 7 over the years that were honest, dependable and looked after him very well, he built a 4 bedroom home and hired them full time. They work in shifts, each has their own bedroom and cater to his every need. They cook, clean, provide his care, run errands and are like members of his family....but it took awhile to find the right ones and those who liked this type of arrangement. But he's treated like a King.

    This situation is really unique since I have heard all the "horror stories" of unsavory CPA's from our members in here.

    That would be an "ideal feature to your home", and I can see why this would be attractive, but I also see the drawbacks.
    Your life is what you make it, and only you have that choice!

  3. #3
    queen whe, re is the person located that built the four-bedroom home? if you don't mind me asking

  4. #4
    Senior Member queen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Garden on the Green, Indiana
    Posts
    1,109
    I met him on another site, he's a cheesehead from Wisconsin
    and a rather high quad with a trach so he needs 24/7..
    Last edited by queen; 08-19-2006 at 07:05 AM.
    Your life is what you make it, and only you have that choice!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    New York USA
    Posts
    291
    And I have a four bedroom I used to have pca living here they had their own bedroom TV computer bathroom. Never found the perfect one, so now I have them working hour 7 a.m. till 7 p.m. my girlfriend stays with me until 11 p.m. and I have people work 11 p.m. until 7 a.m. really suxs,
    keiffer66

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    SW Missouri
    Posts
    829
    As a longtime caregiver working for developmentally disabled and autistic adults in assisted living homes, I find your proposal interesting and admirable. However, I'm not sure it could work.

    Consider this: I and my co-workers are constantly pressured to supervise, supervise, supervise. Privacy is apparently a figment of the administrations imagination (and this is common to all such agencies btw). We had an autistic resident recently color all over the walls inside his walk-in closet. Come a few weeks later, we got a scathing memo about how we weren't supervising him, etc. I was frustrated - how can one employee be expected to keep tabs on someone in a bedroom closet, to say nothing of the two other residents who share the house? EVERYONE, no matter who they are, disability or no, HAS to have some privacy. It is very nearly a universal and basic human need. And this individual is certainly capable of staying in his room safely. I've also worked in group homes, which afford even less privacy, and I'm certain many residents have suffered for it. It's all really depressing when you get right down to it.

    Anyway, this is what I'm getting at. In my opinion, your proposal would be possibly self-defeating because you would be limiting yourself to a certain limited area, when you live in a HOUSE, that is, a kitchen, living room, and so on. You can't 'live' in one room any more than you and everyone else would need to live in the rest of the home. Or something like that.

    I don't see any simple solution here, but I wish you luck....

    Tom

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by thenose
    However, my problem has been if I needed a PCA, I did not want them to be "in" my personal space. I know this might might sound silly, considering what they often have to do, but I mean my surroundings are wide open to any PCA coming in.
    If you have a steady PCA, this would be less of an issue, but what about the new ones? I am willing to bet that we have all had the experience of a PCA from hell that we did not trust in our home.
    ---
    My thought, if I were to design a home/apartment, is a special entrance for in-house help.

    Off the bedroom, an entrance one could easily grant or deny entry to a caregiver by the occupants choice. Off the bedroom, there would be the shower/bathroom including a closet for any medical supplies/medications/equipment.
    A new, or part time, PCA would be able to meet your needs without entering the rest of your domain.
    The trusted, senior aides, or your family/roomies/spouses would deal with anything needed in the rest of the house.

    I know that for someone in tiny senior housing, this would be impossible, but in many of the living centers I have seen, this would have been possible if they had been designed a little differently, using the same amount of space.

    I am curious what you all think...

    If you could, would you keep most of your aides/nurses out of your main living area?
    Are you meaning in specifically "living centers" for disabled or any housing?

    Not being able to fully care for one's own personal care needs is going to require some compromise and trade-off in privacy.

    From your description, are you talking about having different PCA's doing different tasks? - ie just your bath/b&b/dressing, others doing homecare? (would this not be entrusting less personal care stuff to "senior aides", while the less trusted new aides get to manage your intimate care tasks?)

    Many disabled may not have the resources to have many different aides available to them to do the different tasks you are speaking of, but if one does, then great. Some aides ONLY do certain tasks, esp. if Agency limits/compartmentalizes - ie. "medical" RN, LPN (incl. b/b and some invasive), PCA (dressing/bathing, No b/b, etc.), homemaker (only doing household tasks), etc.

    Working with any PCA would require some level of trust, and further building and reinforcing trust as you work together, becoming more familiar and developing some type of relationship. This may be harder to do if you are always suspicious and restrict them to some "back" entrance.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    106
    Yes, I think the house would be more private if the "back" entrance could be used by PCA's who bathed/turned/dressed.
    No need for them to be in the rest of the space.

    I am trying to see if this could be done and how much it would add to construction costs, if anything.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Norm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Media, PA
    Posts
    1,566
    I would like a sitting room next to my bed room with couch table even tv. Where the Nurse could sit until needed. It would also be nice for them to have their own space away from the family so as not to feel like they are in the way.
    "Some people say that, the longer you go the better it gets the more you get used to it, I'm actually finding the opposite is true."

    -Christopher Reeve on his Paralysis

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by Norm
    I would like a sitting room next to my bed room with couch table even tv. Where the Nurse could sit until needed. It would also be nice for them to have their own space away from the family so as not to feel like they are in the way.
    Norm, this is one of the main reasons for my search.

    There is a common feeling that a PCA should be in the home...period.

    I am thinking outside that.

    If a PCA is there for a BP or bath, why should they be walking through the living room to do it?

    I will see if I can post the drawing for this, which might make this a bit clearer.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •