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Thread: Assistance dog (m)

  1. #11
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    Thanks so much for the link to Paws for a Cause. I already asked for information via the website. It sounds like they are more open minded about how a dog can assist a disabled person. Thank you so much!

    Ami & Chad
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  2. #12

    My dog.

    I got Fuzzy from a litter, She was te smallest one, and noone wanted her. I took het home with me. A friend of mine trained k-9s. He gave her some training, and I have taught her everything else. She does everything I want her to do.
    Jerry

  3. #13
    put in a pm
    Last edited by Liz321; 07-31-2006 at 10:09 AM.
    Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

    I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

  4. #14
    Jerry,

    Fuzzy is one beautiful animal...

    Teena

    ps---sorry for the slight hijack of this thread...

    now back to the business at hand...

  5. #15
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    I just got a golden/lab mix puppy to train as a service dog through Top Dog also. But be warned a 3 month old puppy is a 24 hour moving disaster. Puppy proof your house before you sign on.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  6. #16
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    I love Labs, have always had them, or a mix just like yours. Wonderful pets and very smart and trainanble. Ours is 7 so training her to be a helper is probably a little late. Just something to be aware of ..... they are really puppies as far as behavior goes until they are almost 2 years old, even tho' they look like a "grown-up" dog long before that. The training they will get should help control that.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  7. #17
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjean423
    I love Labs, have always had them, or a mix just like yours. Wonderful pets and very smart and trainanble. Ours is 7 so training her to be a helper is probably a little late. Just something to be aware of ..... they are really puppies as far as behavior goes until they are almost 2 years old, even tho' they look like a "grown-up" dog long before that. The training they will get should help control that.
    I actually helped wean a litter of 6 that included Reggie my last dog. You are right about puppydom. Most bones continue to grow in length until 18 months. I found it just takes repetitve positive reinforcement to get them public ready for outside restaurants, parks, etc by age 5 to 6 months here in the states. In Germany people help by ignoring any bad behavior as long as they see you are dealing with it. But they do teeth and it hurts. So have rraw hide bones soaked in water for a short time ready for tender gums and lots of soft, mouthy toys ready to stick in puppy's face when they grab your computer wires.

    And it does help if you have a morning person and a night person. I mean someone up at 6am to feed and walk the pup and deal with morning stuff and a late nighter who last walks pup around 11 or midnight. You can control middle of the night walks and accidents by feeding on a schedule 3 times a day but water at all times. Reggie was a self feeder. Other puppies given free access will empty bowl after bowl. This one, Maggie, we are schedule feeding to avoid excess middle of the night problems. Crate training a service dog seems strange to me and other than using one I never shut the door on so she'll be used to it if we need to fly, would not use one. Reggie's I put out and put some old towels and a few toys in and sat by a few times. She began using it for her den for afternoon naps. That's just me. Others swear by crate training.
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  8. #18
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    We got ours when she was a year old (I don't think original owners thought she would ever grow up and behave) and she was crate trained then. Overly so in my mind .... did not know what to do if she was OUT of the crate, and not outside, and able to run wild. SHe just went nuts in the house. (It took a while, but now she is wonderful!) We eventually ditched the crate, but it is funny now, one of he favorite spots to chill is under the kitchen table, with all the chairs pushed in ..... a space even SMALLER than her crate!
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  9. #19
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    Its funny how they need a space of their own. My dogs are by no means service dogs.....LOL but I crate trained both of them. My Shi tzu goes to her pillow to nap and my little mix goes in his crate. I don't shut him up in it anymore but it is almost like it is his security. I think most dogs just adapt to the disabled person. I have never had any problems with my dogs. It is almost like they know I have limitations.

    Good luck Ami and I hope chad gets a dog soon. I don't know what I would do without mine.....they are my emotional support I guess. LOL I know a dog would be alot of help to you and him.
    T12-L2; Burst fracture L1: Incomplete walking with AFO's and cane since 1989

    My goal in life is to be as good of a person my dog already thinks I am. ~Author Unknown

  10. #20
    I'm thrilled to see Sue Pendleton with a new dog. She didn't look quite like Sue without one.

    This is a fascinating subject. Good luck to everybody.

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