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Thread: Stephen Davies Lab Report

  1. #21
    Senior Member mjschaef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    mjschaef,

    Here are more up-to-date data about NIH funding.

    NIH priorities from 2003 to 2007 which gives links to the current year and anticipated 2006 budget.

    In addition, here is some discussion in a topic started by Stephen Davies
    NIH Funding



    Wise.
    Thanks Dr. Young. Both threads were very enlightening.
    --------------------
    "On November 2 the voice of the people was heard. I promise not to imitate it out of respect for the mentally retarded" - Lewis Black (Comedian)

  2. #22
    Excellent summary, David. Thank you for your thought, time and effort. I'm processing...

  3. #23
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    Phantastic CC,

    Excellent Dr Young
    Excellent Dr Davies
    Excellent Schmeky

    guenther

  4. #24
    Thanks Schmeky, this is all very encouraging.

    About Decorin - I am not sure I fully understand what a proteoglycan is but I understand that it is isolated from cartilage, skin or bone - in the case of this research does the source matter, in other words can it equally be isolated from any of the three? Would it need to be isolated from an individual's tissue or can a sort of 'generic' decorin be applied?

    All the reports you mentioned appear to be in the name Jeannette Davies - is that his wife? In which case it seems to be very much a collaborative effort. Combined credit and thanks to both of them.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    carbar,

    Decorin is a trade name for a substance that is naturally occurring in the body. It is being manufactured for lab use and in the future can be scaled up for large scale distribution. As I understand, it will be generic, i.e., one size fits all.

    Yes, Jeannette Davies is Stephens wife. She is a neuroscientist as well. Very pretty too.

  6. #26
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    Thanks Schmeky. You write here that this lab research is based on cell types that are naturally occurring in the spinal cord, and also that the lab appears to be very close to producing significant results – sine the cells is based on cell types that naturally occurs in the cord as you write here, could this mean that some of the clinical trial steps could be speeded up especially as for safety due to this, if this research will reach this point that is? Also, you mentioned transplantation of embryonic stem cells above here, has this lab been involved in such work? Thanks again.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    I know the scientific portion of the report leaves most folks scratching their heads. It is a different language, however, it would not be possible for me to state conclusions without sound lab reports to substantiate the content.

    What the scientific data boils down to is this:

    Acute SCI has been effectively overcome in the lab by demonstrating robust regeneration, up to an amazing 60%. Most research groups have previously achieved regeneration rates of only 3-5%.

    Furthermore, most current research is based on remyelination of denuded axons. This is the foundation of Kierstad's work, and to the best of my knowledge, McDonald's as well. What if a significant number of people don't have the required 10% of denuded axons that can be remyelinated?

    Ideally, we should remyelinate and regenerate. But what if we could consistently rengenerate 10, 20, 30, 40% or more in the chronic setting?

    I appears we are only months away from having an answer. Months, not years.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    I know the scientific portion of the report leaves most folks scratching their heads. It is a different language, however, it would not be possible for me to state conclusions without sound lab reports to substantiate the content.

    What the scientific data boils down to is this:

    Acute SCI has been effectively overcome in the lab by demonstrating robust regeneration, up to an amazing 60%. Most research groups have previously achieved regeneration rates of only 3-5%.

    Furthermore, most current research is based on remyelination of denuded axons. This is the foundation of Kierstad's work, and to the best of my knowledge, McDonald's as well. What if a significant number of people don't have the required 10% of denuded axons that can be remyelinated?

    Ideally, we should remyelinate and regenerate. But what if we could consistently rengenerate 10, 20, 30, 40% or more in the chronic setting?

    I appears we are only months away from having an answer. Months, not years.

    Is this what you are referring to?
    "The research teams at BCM and the University of Rochester Medical Center took embryonic glial precursor cells and, in the laboratory, induced them to differentiate into a specific type of embryonic astrocyte that is highly supportive of nerve fiber growth. The scientists transplanted these cells into cuts in the spinal cord of adult rats and measured the growth of nerve fibers.
    They then compared healing and recovery in these rats with the recovery in spinal cord injured rats that received either undifferentiated glial precursor cells or no treatment at all.
    The transplants of the precursor-derived astrocytes promoted rapid growth of 40 percent of sensory nerve fibers across the cuts and also suppressed the formation of scar tissue."

    taken from
    http://www.bcm.edu/fromthelab/vol05/is4/06may_n1.html

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmeky
    I know the scientific portion of the report leaves most folks scratching their heads.
    Put it this way then, since those cells are naturally found in the cord is there any steps in the clinical trail "books" that could be bypassed.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leif
    Thanks Schmeky. You write here that this lab research is based on cell types that are naturally occurring in the spinal cord, and also that the lab appears to be very close to producing significant results – sine the cells is based on cell types that naturally occurs in the cord as you write here, could this mean that some of the clinical trial steps could be speeded up especially as for safety due to this, if this research will reach this point that is? Also, you mentioned transplantation of embryonic stem cells above here, has this lab been involved in such work? Thanks again.
    I can't answer speeding up the clinical trial process based on cell type.

    Yes, the recovery this lab has documented is based on the us of ESC's. ESC's are coaxed into a glial-restricted precursor [GRP] (which in the past, has produced regeneration into the scar, but not out and beyond).

    When these GRPs are differentiated into a glial derived astrocyte [GDA], they produce robust functional regeneration 26 out of 26 times.


    Seneca,

    The BBB scale is no longer used. It has been replaced by a walking grid, which provides a more accurate measurement. The grid walk is a sensitive measurement of the ability of the rats to step rhythmically and to coordinate accurate placement of both fore and hind limbs. The score is based on the number of missed steps in 3 series of "runs".

    Normal, uninjured rats missed a total of 2 steps. In the case of the 26 rats studied in the acute setting after being injured and then treated with GDAs, after 28 days they missed 2.5 steps, essentially being "normal". Incidentally, all 26 rats scored the same 2.5, or 100%.

    This is incredible documented recovery.

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