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Thread: Colonoscopy- Prep and procedure

  1. #1

    Colonoscopy- Prep and procedure

    SCI Nurse,
    I have a colonoscopy scheduled for Nov 10. I searched the board, here. Now, I'm really nervous. Couple of questions.

    When is AD a concern, during prep or during procedure, or both? Speaking of BP, mine is always low. Is it likely to really drop after prep?

    What extra precautions are normally taken regarding spasms during the procedure?

    I'm impressed with my GI Doc, but not sure he's seen a lot of people with SCI. Any info you can provide is appreciated.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    worrying is worse than the procedure
    i've read in the past where the nurses have a whole process; you can take from it the parts that apply to you
    some ideas from my experience/readings:
    1. the prep is a mess once the stuff kicks in, have lots of chux on hand and give up trying to do it on the toilet
    2. some insurers (very few) will let you do it the night before inpatient if you can make the medical necessity case (AD)
    3. if you do it at home and are worried about high BP have the required meds avail
    4. tell the md to have the approp anti high bp meds avail during the proc, in recovery and for home (if necess, get him the PVA AD guideline)
    5. enjoy your last meal
    6. take it easy with food afterward, poss skipping bowel care for 2-3 days while your GI tract gets refilled with food

    it's a lot of worry for a procedure that's over in 5-10 minutes, just enjoy the sedation. they have a bp monitor on you, so any rise is easily noted

    good luck

  3. #3
    I would agree with all of this. The prep is not very likely to cause AD, but it is common during the procedure. Be sure the physician monitors your blood pressure and has a plan for managing AD during the procedure. Remember that you may be sedated, so this will interfere with your ability to report symptoms or direct your care. Sedation will NOT prevent AD.

    Spasticity is actually reduced by the position (flexed hips and knees on your side) and is not generally a problem with a flexible scope and an agile physician.

    Ask about the "23 hour outpatient hospitalization". This has worked well for many. You check in the early afternoon of the day before the test, get your prep completed with help from the nursing staff, have your colonoscopy first thing in the AM, then go home as soon as you have recovered from the sedation (usually about a hour). Even Medicare will often cover this if the physician specifically requests this with sufficient justification.

    (KLD)

  4. #4
    The only thing I would add to the advice is to take precautions as to where you go or what you are doing a day or so after the procedure. I found that the "golightly" stuff stays in your system for a while. By the second day after the procedure, I was OK.

  5. #5
    Dan,

    Check out my post from the thread below.

    Colonoscopy prep - PIE* bowel machine

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