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Thread: Lubing cath with Vetericyn -effective?

  1. #1
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    Lubing cath with Vetericyn -effective?

    Anyone use Vetericyn for lubing the cath and /or urethral rinsing ONLY with no bladder flushes? I wonder how effective it is . I'm a little worried about the safety of flushes, and my husband is getting AD all the time as it is. Also C-diff, so I don't want to risk messing up his bowel bacteria. I was thinking of lubing the cath with it , inserting partially- leaving for 30 seconds, and continuing cath. Possibly doing urethral rinses with it too, though not sure how.
    Just wondering if anyone does it this way only with no flushes, and if so, what type of vetericyn (regular strength, gel formula, etc.) - most importantly, does it work?? THANKS

  2. #2
    I use oxybuten sp? 2 hours prior to cath change,usually the AD is caused by the sphnkter,sp? being disrupted,so anything you can do to loosen that sp,muscle will help.I also need a few hits of MJ or i'll be in AD for hours.... compared to a few minutes with the MJ,Yup the MJ makes that much of a diffrence ,
    Nelson.
    C-6,complete

  3. #3
    Why is your husband getting AD all of the time? Does he have bladder spasms? Is he taking anticholinergic (antispasm) medications like oxybutynin?

    Vetericyn bladder instillations would not upset bowel flora (bacteria). What medication is he taking for C.diff?

    I remember reading a thread written by a mother of a very small child. She was worried about instilling Vetericyn into the child's bladder. She lubricated the child's catheters with Vetricyn Hydrogel. She remarked that it made a considerable difference in the number of urinary tract infections her child was getting. Whether lubricating catheters with Vetericyn Hydrogel for an adult would work, I don't know. There are folks here who instill Vetericyn or Vetericyn VF Wound and Infection Care spray and use Hydrogel to lubricate the catheters. If you are using catheters that need to be moistened to activate the lubricant, you could use the Wound and Infection Spray instead of water.

    All the best,
    GJ

  4. #4
    I don't think it could hurt, but it may not be entirely effective. I was cathing with pure alcohol and couldn't stave off infections indefinitely.

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    I don't know why he's getting AD a lot. Every time its the bladder- we cath and its gone. It is anywhere between 500 and up . We will have to start cathing every 5 hours instead of 6 i guess? Sounds like more UTI's , but..
    I dont' know about bladder spasms. He is on baclofen, but i don't think any other anti-spasm. He is starting to feel when his bladder is full, which he could not before. I'm interested.. what are you thinking?

  6. #6
    First, what is your husband's level of injury?

    Second, it is not unusual at all, when the bladder management program is intermittent catheterization that he will have to cath every 3 or 4 hours. He may need to get an urodynamics study done so it is clear what his bladder pressures are, which will dictate what bladder management process is best for him.

    As I asked before, Is he taking anticholinergic (antispasm) medications like oxybutynin? If he isn't on an anticholinergic for bladder spasms that can cause autonomia, he needs to consult with a urologist and get on a bladder spasm medication like oxybutyin.

    Why is he on baclofen? That is usually a pain moderating medication.

    He may also be experiencing autonomia because of the C.diff. What is he taking for C.diff?

    All the best,
    GJ

  7. #7
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    Baclofen isn't pain moderating, its for spasms (although some spasms may cause pain so indirectly it may lower pain in some people). Baclofen is used in most people with SCI in my understanding, Chad uses it for reducing spasms so he doesn't kick his way out of his chair.

    Your husband may need ditropan or Sanctuara for bladder spasms, that will help with the AD.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JacksonsGirl View Post
    Every time its the bladder- we cath and its gone. It is anywhere between 500 and up . We will have to start cathing every 5 hours instead of 6 i guess? Sounds like more UTI's , but..
    It sounds to me that 500 it the point that his bladder is getting uncomfortable. So yes, cath more often and see if that helps.

    I have found that cathing more often doesn't increase utis. You get used to your own germs. So it isn't like you are going to get a uti after x number of caths. I actually am more likely to get a uti if I have to draw out the amount of time between caths for some reason. Especially if I throw off my schedule for some reason .... say get up extra early, then forget to cath until my usual 2nd time.

    The fact that he is recognizing when his bladder is full is great! It will make things a lot easier.

    Oh, and Ami is right. Baclofen is for spasms, not for pain. (altho in some cases the spasms are painful, or trigger pain, in which case pain relief can be a sort of side effect.) But it is not for bladder spasms, the bladder is a different type of muscle. He would most likely be on a different bladder med, often ditropan, or something like it. I am surprised that he isn't, it is pretty typical. I would bring it up with his urologist, it might help the ad.

    Edited to add the "Ami is right" ..... realiZed I practically quoted her, lol.
    Last edited by sjean423; 09-06-2012 at 10:56 PM.
    T7-8 since Feb 2005

  9. #9
    Senior Member zillazangel's Avatar
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    Yes, for us the key to fewer UTIs was fewer people cathing him rather than trying to reduce the number of times we cathed him. You may want to look into a suprapubic catheter, but that's a whole 'nother ball of wax.... that's what Chad has now, for the past 4 years or so, and it has been an absolute godsend. If he can't cath himself, I strongly recommend an SP.
    Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by sjean423 View Post
    Oh, and Ami is right. Baclofen is for spasms, not for pain. (altho in some cases the spasms are painful, or trigger pain, in which case pain relief can be a sort of side effect.) But it is not for bladder spasms, the bladder is a different type of muscle. He would most likely be on a different bladder med, often ditropan, or something like it. I am surprised that he isn't, it is pretty typical. I would bring it up with his urologist, it might help the ad.
    We need to define terms about spasms. Bacolfen is usually used for muculoskeletal spasms, which are a major cause of pain in spinal cord injury. Anticholinergic agents like oxybutynin are usually prescribed for bladder spasms.

    All the best,
    GJ

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