Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: complete t8 level sci - she says she can move her legs but can't fell it

  1. #1

    complete t8 level sci - she says she can move her legs but can't fell it

    Dear I want any advice on the following,

    I am RS. Last November my mother, 65years old diabetic met with an accident and she was paralyzed. She had T8 level spinal cord injury and the doctor told us that after an MRI her spinal cord was cut into two parts in the level of T8. So she is a complete injury person. My mum was not able to feel her legs or any place downward from her stomach. She cannot control her bladder and bowel movement. She came home couple of weeks ago after staying in the hospital fro about 6 months and she also has a bed sore just above her anal area. She is being treated for her bed sore, it is healing very slowly since she always on the bed.

    please understand that in a country like Sri Lanka there is not much people pr professionals we can ask advice from. I am writing this mail to you because I want to tell you something which happened today/

    Today I went to see my mum who is at the moment living with my sister, she was very much depressed but she was happy to see me. She told me that she can move her legs but she cannot feel it. She has told me this when she was in the hospital about 3 months back. But I though that she was not serious and didn’t care. But today I saw that she moved her legs, but she says that she cannot feel them. Then how can she move the legs if she is a complete injury person or if her spinal cord is cut in the level of T8?

    Please help me with this I need all the advice I can get.

    Thanks,

    RS
    Last edited by Jim; 10-18-2012 at 10:30 AM.

  2. #2
    well, nobody has answered so i'll try. complete injury does not necessarily mean the cord is cut. i have known several people who can move their legs but not feel them. this is because sensory is transmitted down a different part of the cord than motor. likely, the doctors are just confusing you with semantics. that happens a lot. if she is moving her legs, obviously her cord is not completely cut (if, indeed, at all).

    hopefully, one of the sci nurses will explain this better.

  3. #3
    Just because your spinal cord is not cut doesn't mean you can't be complete. My cord isn't cut and I am complete. Complete basically means, or so I think, you will not gain anything back that you haven't already.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ChopperChick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    815
    I am sure the nurse will answer you, but my advice is not to read to much into what the doctors tell you or her. If she is moving her legs that it wonderful. Not even the best doctor can predict the future.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ChopperChick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    815
    I am sure the nurse will answer you, but my advice is not to read to much into what the doctors tell you or her. If she is moving her legs that it wonderful. Not even the best doctor can predict the future.

  6. #6
    complete on the asia scale is defined by anal sensation, not by whether cord is cut ot not. wise has an article on it:

    http://sci.rutgers.edu/index.php?pag...nalLevels.html

    frankly, i don't know too many ppl whose cords are cut. my c6 vertebra was 100% displaced, yet my cord is intact. i am incomplete on the asia scale as i have sensation.

    the definition of complete/incomplete has changed a few times over my 20 yrs of sci.
    Last edited by cass; 05-26-2006 at 01:48 AM.

  7. #7
    yeah, for me defining complete or incomplete is irrelevant, i can say what i want, it's results we're after. and most of all, hope and courage.
    Don't cry because it is over, smile because it happened

  8. #8
    Unless one gets a spinal cord injury from a stab wound or a gun shot wound, it is rare that the cord is really cut.

    Chances are however that she does have a complete injury. The movement in her legs could be voluntary but she could also have learned how to trigger spasms so that the legs move when she "tells" them to. This may even have functional value so she could help with her legs when she is transferred into a chair.

    Don't tread on her hope, though. Just let things unfold as they unfold. Rejoice in the gains but do not set your heart on them.

    I hope this helps.

    RAB

  9. #9
    dear RAB,

    Thanks for the reply about my mum,

    rs
    Last edited by Jim; 10-18-2012 at 10:29 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Bunn Bunn Muscles
    By spidergirl in forum Care
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 04-18-2006, 12:21 AM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-29-2004, 08:03 PM
  3. Project Walk Website Update
    By Snowman in forum Exercise & Recovery
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-14-2003, 04:30 PM
  4. relationship re:SCI & thyroid
    By franroty in forum Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-02-2001, 08:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •