Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: What size cath is normal?

  1. #1
    Senior Member ChopperChick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    815

    What size cath is normal?

    Mike has been slacking on the caths and I know it is all trial and error, but.... How many cc's should a "normal" cath be. He cathed this morning at 9am, 3 pm, and just now. The latter was a biggee (600cc's) but he had a gatorade.

  2. #2
    When I was in rehab, they didn't like a cath over 500cc's, and said that 150 was small. Eventually, if not already, he will be getting a warning sign to cath. To me volume doesn't really matter so long as it's not too concintrated or cloudy. Just try to make sure he caths when he gets his warning because holding it isn't that healthy and there's a chance of voiding.
    ~Ashley~

  3. #3
    Senior Member ChopperChick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    815
    Thanks for the quick reply. Can you tell me, what are the warning signs?
    BTW he did void a little last weekend when he was busy and didn't cath.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    534
    It's important that Mike cath about 5 times in 24 hours. It's also important that he keep himself well-hydrated. If he's well hydrated then his urinary tract works more efficiently. I find that when my husband Don does not drink enough that a UTI is just waiting to happen.
    I agree with Pash... anything over 500cc's is not good ... if Don's bladder gets too full then he just leaks... but with a T6 injury, Mike runs the possible risk of having AD if he gets too full. The risk of AD is not as high as it would be with a higher injury but he still runs the risk.

  5. #5
    Senior Member ChopperChick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    815
    Thanks again. He is sort of suprising me that he is being so lax. He wants to go by the book for everything but so often he spends 10 minutes cathing only to get 150cc so I guess he decided to do it less often. I guess it is one more thing we are going to have ot learn as we go. Personally I hate the 4am cath. I do that one just to be nice But, I will say this, we are not setting an alra, clock to cath anymore so that is a step back to normalcy .

  6. #6
    Senior Member Broknwing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,742
    I have to say that everyone is individual....I don't necesarily always cath as many as 5 times in 24hrs. I can tell when I need to cath and cath accordingly. Sometimes my bladder goes rogue on me(a couple fri nites ago) and I'll cath as many as 5 times in only 4 hrs(YIKES) and sometimes I'll cath as little as 3 times in 24 hrs....It all depends on the individual person.

    ChopperChick, I wouldn't be worried that he didn't cath very many times, I wouldn't even be worried about an OCCASIONAL 600ml cath....but the nurses here don't recommend them to be that high. (This is different than what I was taught in rehab however)...I would be most concerned if they start to get cloudy or start to have sediment in them. The most important thing, as others have mentioned is to keep him hydrated, drink water, or gatorade(as you mentioned he was). I like Propel water, it's flavored, has some of the added benefits of gatorade but isn't quite as potent.
    'Chelle
    L-1 inc 11/24/03

    "My Give-a-Damn's Busted"......

  7. #7
    Senior Member keps's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    5,355
    Quote Originally Posted by ergvepeog
    It's important that Mike cath about 5 times in 24 hours. It's also important that he keep himself well-hydrated. If he's well hydrated then his urinary tract works more efficiently. I find that when my husband Don does not drink enough that a UTI is just waiting to happen.
    I agree with Pash... anything over 500cc's is not good ... if Don's bladder gets too full then he just leaks... but with a T6 injury, Mike runs the possible risk of having AD if he gets too full. The risk of AD is not as high as it would be with a higher injury but he still runs the risk.

    ergvepeog is right. ad is a real risk, even if Mike has never experienced it before. ad can start out of the blue.
    I have a T4 injury, and last year ended up in hospital (not needed, but I was terrified) twice, because I suddenly started suffering from ad. The very first time it happened, I had 1.5 litres in my bladder. Yes, you read right - 1500 mls!
    I, like a lot of others, was told not to let my bladder have more than 500mls. But I do got more than that fairly often. I can feel the start of ad if my bladder gets to about 500 - 600 mls..

  8. #8
    Senior Member nevada's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    north dakoa
    Posts
    716
    In responce to Pash's comment I too only cath when I get the feeling that I need to cath which to me is the same feelling I had prior to SCI. I may cath only four times a day or like Brokenwing sometimes as many as three in as many hours. Sometimes my caths are only around 300 cc and other times they are as high as 700 cc the later being after sleeping.

  9. #9
    The standard we have is less than 500 cc in each cath. More than that runs the risk of causing back flow to the kidneys and causing a bladder infection by overstretching the bladder wall. Going with that we teach people to pace their fluid intake to around 200 cc/hour (that's less than 1 measuring cup) rather than guzzling a lot of fluid at one time. So IN and OUT have to be in balance. If a person drinks more, he/she should cath more often.

    RAB

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ChopperChick
    Thanks for the quick reply. Can you tell me, what are the warning signs?
    BTW he did void a little last weekend when he was busy and didn't cath.
    At the begining, my warning signs changed periodically. First there was pounding headaches, then blochy red skin, then goosebumps, and now I get a tingling sensation in my head and arms. The tingling has stayed the same for about a year and a half now. Basically he has to be aware of anything different different going on with his body.
    ~Ashley~

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-17-2002, 11:35 AM
  2. Brain Region Size Linked to Post-Traumatic Stress
    By Max in forum Health & Science News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-14-2002, 11:42 AM
  3. INCONTINANCE/BLADDER CATH QUESTION
    By kngtreeman in forum Care
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-16-2002, 08:42 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •