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Thread: Completes and Pain

  1. #1
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    Completes and Pain

    Completes SCI and Pain ....I wonder why we completes sci`s have neuropain.
    We cannot feel the anus ,but our body is tortured.Any ideas?
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  2. #2
    I feel u on this!!!! I have pins and needles in my legs and it always feels like I have someone standing on my big toe.
    Gingerbread Man

    If you don't like how it is, do a 180 turn and get the opposite.

  3. #3
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gingerbread Man
    I feel u on this!!!! I have pins and needles in my legs and it always feels like I have someone standing on my big toe.
    is so strange how the central nervous system works ...i asked many docs regarding this issue ....most of them told me that the pain is only in my head.is not true.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  4. #4
    Junior Member racer's Avatar
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    There is no clear answer to this however damaged nerve fibers tend to send incorrect signals to the pain centers of the brain. The impact of a nerve fiber injury includes a change in nerve function both at the site of injury and to areas around the injury. The brain still has a “map” from where the nerves originally carried impulses and the disruption or partial disruption due to sci can result in misfire and nervous system chaos that is often perceived as pain.

    It is interesting how various things tend to increase neuropathic pain though(infection, sores, sitting for extended periods, dehydration, various bowel/bladder issues, orthopedic/muscular injury etc.). Kind of obvious, but for many I think anything that would have caused your body aggravation prior to injury now is expressed neuropathically. SCI is the gift that keeps on giving. I love it

  5. #5
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    Neuropathic pain is a complex, chronic pain state that usually is accompanied by tissue injury. With neuropathic pain, the nerve fibers themselves may be damaged, dysfunctional or injured. These damaged nerve fibers send incorrect signals to other pain centers. The impact of nerve fiber injury includes a change in nerve function both at the site of injury and areas around the injury.
    One example of neuropathic pain is called phantom limb syndrome. This occurs when an arm or a leg has been removed because of illness or injury, but the brain still gets pain messages from the nerves that originally carried impulses from the missing limb. These nerves now misfire and cause pain.
    A brief history of pain

    Ancient civilizations recorded on stone tablets accounts of pain and the treatments used: pressure, heat, water, and sun. Early humans related pain to evil, magic, and demons. Relief of pain was the responsibility of sorcerers, shamans, priests, and priestesses, who used herbs, rites, and ceremonies as their treatments.
    The Greeks and Romans were the first to advance a theory of sensation, the idea that the brain and nervous system have a role in producing the perception of pain. But it was not until the Middle Ages and well into the Renaissance-the 1400s and 1500s-that evidence began to accumulate in support of these theories. Leonardo da Vinci and his contemporaries came to believe that the brain was the central organ responsible for sensation. Da Vinci also developed the idea that the spinal cord transmits sensations to the brain.
    In the 17th and 18th centuries, the study of the body-and the senses-continued to be a source of wonder for the world's philosophers. In 1664, the French philosopher René Descartes described what to this day is still called a "pain pathway." Descartes illustrated how particles of fire, in contact with the foot, travel to the brain and he compared pain sensation to the ringing of a bell.
    In the 19th century, pain came to dwell under a new domain-science-paving the way for advances in pain therapy. Physician-scientists discovered that opium, morphine, codeine, and cocaine could be used to treat pain. These drugs led to the development of aspirin, to this day the most commonly used pain reliever. Before long, anesthesia-both general and regional-was refined and applied during surgery.
    "It has no future but itself," wrote the 19th century American poet Emily Dickinson, speaking about pain. As the 21st century unfolds, however, advances in pain research are creating a less grim future than that portrayed in Dickinson's verse, a future that includes a better understanding of pain, along with greatly improved treatments to keep it in check.
    Last edited by adi chicago; 09-25-2008 at 04:32 PM.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  6. #6
    Senior Member Timaru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adi chicago
    is so strange how the central nervous system works ...i asked many docs regarding this issue ....most of them told me that the pain is only in my head.is not true.
    It is true.

    Read your own post above #5.

    Damaged nerves send the wrong signals to the brain telling it you are in pain.

  7. #7
    Neuropathic pain originates from the nerves themselves, when they are damaged. You might find it useful to help understand this by reading a little about phantom pain, where people feel pain in a part of the body that is gone, such as a limg that has been amputated. In rare cases when the brain's "map" of the body goes haywired for some reason, people may even feel pain in a completely non-existant limb, such as a phantom third arm.

  8. #8

    Chiropractor

    Has anyone in the forum had a thermal image of their back? This test showed yesterday, that my daughter, 22 yrs. old, c5 c6 incomplete, has pain in areas below the level of c5 c6 and above level. Most pain indication was concentrated in the T9 T10 areas. Any thoughts on using a chiropractor or has anyone tried manipulation of spine since their SCI and would this possibly help with nerve pain, or would it make the nerve pain worse? My daughter takes 2000 mg of gabapentin a day and 6 mg of zanaflex a day so she can sleep uninterrupted and 120 mg of baclophen and occasional shot of tequila or glass of beer.

    Sam, c5 c6 incomplete, 18 mos. Since burst fracture from diving accident while away at college LSU
    Texas
    Aggie Mom 2007

  9. #9
    Banned adi chicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhorn4012
    Has anyone in the forum had a thermal image of their back? This test showed yesterday, that my daughter, 22 yrs. old, c5 c6 incomplete, has pain in areas below the level of c5 c6 and above level. Most pain indication was concentrated in the T9 T10 areas. Any thoughts on using a chiropractor or has anyone tried manipulation of spine since their SCI and would this possibly help with nerve pain, or would it make the nerve pain worse? My daughter takes 2000 mg of gabapentin a day and 6 mg of zanaflex a day so she can sleep uninterrupted and 120 mg of baclophen and occasional shot of tequila or glass of beer.

    Sam, c5 c6 incomplete, 18 mos. Since burst fracture from diving accident while away at college LSU
    Texas
    Thank you for posting ....if a thermal image can prove that our pain is real ....many docs will belive us instead to say that our pain is just in our heads[phantom pain].
    http://www.sce.carleton.ca/faculty/f...rmAssess02.pdf
    Last edited by adi chicago; 09-28-2008 at 02:30 PM.
    • Dum spiro, spero.
      • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope."

  10. #10
    my doctor told me that since my injury is at the end of the spinal cord that's why I have so much pain i'm L2/L1.

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