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Thread: Some Female Spinal Cord Patients With Amenorrhea May Still Conceive Children: Present

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Some Female Spinal Cord Patients With Amenorrhea May Still Conceive Children: Present

    Some Female Spinal Cord Patients With Amenorrhea May Still Conceive Children: Presented at AACE

    By John Otrompke

    CHICAGO, I.L. -- May 2, 2006 -- Many women who sustain permanent spinal cord injury and develop resulting transitory amenorrhea may still be able to conceive children, according to a poster presented here at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE).

    "Amenorrhea has been proven to be stress-related, but women return to normal sexual function after transitory amenorrhea," said Ghasa Mahmood, MD, endocrinology fellow, Martin Luther King/Charles Drew University Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, United States, in a presentation on April 27th.

    Of 128 women who sustained a spinal cord injury, 53 immediately developed amenorrhea, or a cessation of menstrual flow. Of those, 3 went into menopause, Mahmood said. The study was a retrospective analysis of patients in a cardiovascular risk study. All of the women who went into menopause were over 40 years of age at the time, she said.

    "Of the remaining 50 women, we had 10 pregnancies," Dr. Mahmood said, calling the study the largest to date in the field. The median period of transitory amenorrhea was 7.96 months, she said. "But even if the patient gets amenorrhea for 15 months, not 6 months, she can still get pregnant, because the duration of amenorrhea is not statistically significant."

    Also bearing no apparent relation to the likelihood of pregnancy in the study was the level of a patient's injury. Spinal trauma experience by the patients included cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spinal trauma. "All of these were permanent injuries, resulting in irreversible paralysis," Dr. Mahmood emphasized.

    "The only thing that our data suggested to be a relevant factor was the patient's age at the time of the trauma," Dr. Mahmood said. "The mean age was 21 among women who later got pregnant, and 28 among the women who didn't."

    Among the 10 women who conceived, 4 elected to terminate the pregnancy, while at least half of the remaining 6 gave birth via Caesarean section, according to the poster.

    Dr. Mahmood said he intends to investigate the relationship between spinal cord trauma and amenorrhea.


    http://www.docguide.com/news/content...257162004C614E

  2. #2
    Thanks, although this is not really news. It has been known for at least 10 years.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by SCI-Nurse
    Thanks, although this is not really news. It has been known for at least 10 years.

    (KLD)
    Ok, Ms. Dunn You welcome!....But its not my fault that governments continiuosly for Decades(!!!) give grants to scientist to study mating habits of quads, cooling spines of rats (without wide application to humans); to treadmill cats & make happy rodents to walk.....This particular research was presented like new on recent conference

  4. #4

    Amenorrhea After Spinal Cord Injury Does Not Hamper Pregnancy

    http://www.medpagetoday.com/OBGYN/Infertility/tb/3181

    AACE: Amenorrhea After Spinal Cord Injury Does Not Hamper Pregnancy


    By Peggy Peck, MedPage Today Staff Writer
    Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
    April 27, 2006
    MedPage Today Action Points

    * Explain to women who ask that periods of temporary amenorrhea do not always signal chronic infertility.

    * These studies were published as abstracts and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary as they have not yet been reviewed and published in a peer-reviewed publication.

    Ghasak Mahmood, M.D. Rancho Los Amigos Rehab Center
    CHICAGO, April 27 — Women who have transient amenorrhea for up to seven months after spinal cord injury can conceive, carry the fetus to term, and nurse the infant following delivery, researchers reported here today.

    "Women can achieve a full reproductive life as long as the injury occurs when the woman is still in her early twenties," said Ghasak Mahmood, M.D., an endocrinology fellow at the Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey, Calif.

    more...

  5. #5
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Women Who Have Experienced Temporary Amenorrhea at Time of Spinal Cord Injury May Sti

    Women Who Have Experienced Temporary Amenorrhea at Time of Spinal Cord Injury May Still Achieve Pregnancy

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    Medical News Keywords
    TEMPORARY AMENORRHEA, SPINAL CORD INJURY, PREGNANCY, AACE, ENDOCRINOLOGY, DIABETES, THYROID DISORDERS, GROWTH HORMONE DEFICIENCY, OSTEOPOROSIS, CHOLESTEROL DISORDERS, HYPERTENSION, OBESITY Contact Information
    Available for logged-in reporters onlyDescription
    Women who have experienced temporary amenorrhea at the time of their spinal cord injury (SCI) may achieve a successful pregnancy particularly if they were injured at a younger age, according to new research that will be presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Fifteenth Annual Meeting.

    Newswise — Women who have experienced temporary amenorrhea at the time of their spinal cord injury (SCI) may achieve a successful pregnancy particularly if they were injured at a younger age, according to new research that will be presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) Fifteenth Annual Meeting and Clinical Congress will be held April 26 – 30, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.
    SCI is a disabling, chronic condition which affects multiple organs including the reproductive system. There is limited data in scientific literature regarding effect of SCI on women’s reproductive life. This retrospective study will be presented by Ghasak Mahmood, MD; Sylvia J Shaw, MD; Yaga Szlachick, MD; Rod Adkins, PhD and Stefan Bughi, MD. This study took place at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center in Downey, California and was selected by the AACE to be featured as an oral presentation on Saturday, April 29, 2006. The AACE Fifteenth Annual Meeting and Clinical Congress will be held April 26 – 30, at the Hyatt Regency Chicago.
    AACE is a professional medical organization with more than 5,300 members in the United States and 85 other countries. Founded in 1991, AACE is dedicated to the optimal care of patients with endocrine problems. AACE initiatives inform the public about endocrine disorders. AACE also conducts continuing education programs for clinical endocrinologists, physicians whose advanced, specialized training enables them to be experts in the care of endocrine disease, such as diabetes, thyroid disorders, growth hormone deficiency, osteoporosis, cholesterol disorders, hypertension and obesity.

    http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/519836/

  6. #6
    max, i dunno where these ppl come up with this stuff. i know many, many women who gave birth post injury. in fact, i was told way back in 1986 that it was not a prob. and it wasn't. for me or for many women i've known.

    it seems to be the guys who have a bigger issue.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by cass
    max, i dunno where these ppl come up with this stuff. i know many, many women who gave birth post injury. in fact, i was told way back in 1986 that it was not a prob. and it wasn't. for me or for many women i've known.
    Me either Cass. This is the first I've heard about SCI affecting the reproductive system.

    Amenorrhea can be caused by any type of severe stress to the body. With SCI it's transient, once the body settles down, you can get pregnant just as quickly and easily as any other woman. I was told that in 93 at the Miami Project.

    I wish precious grant money wasn't wasted on researching what is already known.
    Last edited by antiquity; 07-22-2006 at 03:41 PM.

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