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Thread: leg movement only when leaning forward?

  1. #1

    leg movement only when leaning forward?

    20 months past surgery (T6 cavernous angioma) I'm able to move my right toes and ankle BUT ONLY if i'm sitting up and leaning slightly forward. Has anyone had a similar situation?
    Thanks,
    Max

  2. #2
    Hi Max,
    I am almost 4 years past injury and no surgery. However I have and pray that I will continue to go through similar situations like the one you are describing.
    In my condition the control of the quad muscles is better and clearly responsive when I am lying flat or standing tall in the standing frame or KAFO braces. I can pick my right leg up and kind of bring it in the car when I transfer in the car. I am to the point where I can -and will continue to- lift my self higher than the seat cushion when I get in and out of the car by using the quad muscles (my car is very low compared to the WC hight, so this is really amazing). Having said that I cannot lift my leg at all when I am in the wheel chair as of now and I can't have good contractions of the quads either; but pray that it will work one day.
    This is how I try to deal with it in my condition (T-2 ASIAC) and hope it will work for you too:
    Get started on an aquatic program in therapy and then at a swimming pool. Being in the water permits any muscles that receive any signals through the spinal cord to show some visible response that you or a therapist can see and start to work on each response. Hopefully with repeated sessions it will start to become stronger and it will excite more of the muscle to work. Being in the water is an excellent stimulant and it will cause a "shock" that I hope you will find a way to use to further returns.
    The best thing is to start a FES program and to send a command from your brain when you see the light go on, re-educating your spinal cord tracks. It works for me, the one I have uses a 9 volt battery and I can use it every where.
    Read more about FES and share it with your therapist.
    ......
    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is another way to
    make muscles and nerves work, even when there is paralysis.
    Shepherd and University of Georgia researchers have shown
    that FES can improve circulation, muscle size and bone density.
    In addition, FES can potentially decrease secondary complications
    such as obesity, diabetes, and skin breakdown in people with
    complete SCI. There is also limited evidence suggesting that FES
    exercise on a bike may help people with complete SCI feel and
    move again after years of not moving. Shepherd is currently involved
    in a study examining the benefits of using the FES bike to improve
    health, wellness and function of the nervous system in people with
    both complete and incomplete SCI.
    from http://www.shepherd.org/shepherdhome...ighlight=0,fes
    A very good rehab institute is the one in Michigan. Go to their site and read some of what they do. http://www.centerforscirecovery.org/therapy.html
    Wish you the best.
    God Bless

  3. #3
    Ace,
    Thanks for your response and suggestions.
    I'm already on an exercise program, which includes: FES bike, swimming, ambulating w/KFAO, acupuncture, TENS, hand-cycling, etc

    I'm perplexed by how I'm able to get movement only when i stretch my lower back. When i lay down i can't move anything. My worry is that i was 'put back together' incorrectly after the surgery.

    I'm curious to hear from people that could initiate movement only in certain conditions, and if the movement improved with time.

    Thanks
    Max

  4. #4
    Max

    We see this all the time at Project Walk. We call it "positional movement", and we try to work on this as much as possible. What we have seen is that if we work on the movement while gradually moving your back into a different position, over time we can get many people to initiate the movement from a non stretched position.

    Hope that helps, hard to explain it in writing


    Eric Harness, CSCS
    Founder/President
    Neuro Ex, Inc
    Adaptive Performance and Neuro Recovery

  5. #5
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    Max, you know how some muscles are easier to move when they're in a certain position, or harder to move when they're in an awkward position? I think has what's happening.

    It seems that putting some weight on your right foot, helps you to move it, i'd try to strengthen that as much as possible, then work on it in other positions.

  6. #6
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    Snowman, ty as always for sharing deeper insight and knowledge of retraining and regaining.
    Max, it would make sense if you read up on biofeedback, etc.
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

  7. #7
    Thanks for all of your responses.
    Max

  8. #8
    I'm very dependent on being in certain positions that allow me to move. Since I've been at it for awhile, I can almost tell exactly how I have to be in order to move. I'm best when I'm in extension.
    -------7-23-04----------
    C5/6- Workin' on Recovery
    www.darrentempleton.com
    www.pushtowalknj.org

  9. #9
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman
    Max

    We see this all the time at Project Walk. We call it "positional movement", and we try to work on this as much as possible. What we have seen is that if we work on the movement while gradually moving your back into a different position, over time we can get many people to initiate the movement from a non stretched position.

    Hope that helps, hard to explain it in writing
    For years now I have lifted, bent and worked out my sons legs/feet prior his leg brace use. I asked him after reading this if we could please try the *on my command* he would try that instance without truly focusing, just something spontaneous. Pleasantly surprised (but he says don't get your hopes up Ma) when I had asked while going into bending and lifting his knee up towards his chest if he would push his leg out resisting. He did it very noticibly twice w/ left leg. He thought the right leg reaction was tone, I think so too- there was difference with the left.

    edited to add that tonight: after a few rounds of the above of stretch/warm up as written above, it would seem he was able to do so again a few times over he could force both legs away from the stretch/bend in I was applying. Cool, way cool~ T.
    Last edited by teesieme; 05-09-2006 at 01:50 AM.
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

  10. #10
    Works for me too - I'm T12comp and if I'm on my back and I/someone lifts my knee to my chest, I can push back on it pretty strong, actually pushing the person back to the point that they have to lean in with their weight to counter me. I always attributed this to the fact that, in this position, my hamstrings and glute muscles are stretched taut. So, even though I can't contract them, I can "pull on them" using the mid-back muscles that I still can fully control.

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