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Thread: Stem-cell breakthrough in treatment of spinal cord injuries

  1. #11
    This is from the 2006 report from the Institute of Neurology and
    National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery:

    • Spinal Repair Unit. In October 2004, a new research
    team lead by Professor Geoffrey Raisman FRS, joined
    the Institute from the MRC NIMR at Mill Hill. The UCL
    Spinal Repair Unit is carrying out a research programme
    aimed at developing stem cell transplantation in the rat,
    for repair of spinal cord injury to the point at which it
    is ready for taking forward to Phase I clinical trials in
    patients with spinal cord injury. The research staff in the
    Unit are working closely with clinical colleagues in the
    NHNN, especially with the spinal surgeons in the Victor
    Horsley Department of Neurosurgery.
    And this is directly about their OEC work:

    Spinal Repair Unit
    Director: Professor Geoffrey
    Raisman, with Dr Daqing Li and Dr
    Ying Li
    The work of the Spinal Repair Unit concerns the repair of spinal cord and
    spinal root injuries by autologous transplantation of adult olfactory
    ensheathing cells.
    Up to now brain and spinal cord injuries which sever nerve fibres have resulted in incurable functional loss. An incoming tide of research is now beginning to challenge this as yet unbreached sea wall. The key to this is a recently discovered type of cell, the olfactory
    ensheathing cell (OEC), which can be obtained from the adult nasal lining.
    We have studied transplantation of cultured adult OECs in spinal cord
    and spinal root lesions in experimental animals. OECs transplanted into
    complete unilateral lesions of the adult rat corticospinal tract at the upper
    cervical level provided a bridge along which the cut corticospinal axons
    regenerated, advancing at about 1-2mm per day, re-entered the distal tract, formed terminal arborisations in the appropriate areas of grey matter, and led to resumption of lost functions
    such as ipsilateral directed forepawretrieval.
    Effective function was achieved after regeneration of less than 1% of the
    severed fibres, and when the OECs were transplanted at survival periods of several months after an astrocytic scar had already formed. Transplantation into complete upper cervical spinal hemisections rehabilitated the forepaw of the operated side for climbing, and restored the breathing rhythm to the phrenic nerve of the operated side. Transplants of OECs have a stimulatory effect on severed optic nerve fibres and induce regeneration of severed dorsal
    root axons into the spinal cord. Since the OECs are derived from an adult stem cell, this raises the possibility that these specialised pathway cells could be generated from adult tissue samples taken from the olfactory
    system and transplanted into areas of damage in other parts of the central nervous system. In collaboration with
    Professor Tom Carlstedt, Mr David Choi and Mr Ahmed Ibrahim, we are
    transplanting cultured adult OECs into a rat model of cervical dorsal rhizotomy with a view to a future clinical trial ofautologous OECs in human brachial plexus avulsion.
    Prof Rasiman has support from the International Spinal Research Trust who are also funding research into ways of making quantifiable measurements of improvements follwing trial treatments. It is important that if and when trials go ahead that any changes that occur can be attributed to the treatment and not to any other variable. We hear a lot on these threads about someone wh has improved but there is always a response to say "well maybe there were these other factors involved...."

  2. #12
    This is the link for the report mentioned above:

    http://www.ion.ucl.ac.uk/docs/Report-2006.pdf

  3. #13
    Prof Raisman is proposing that the first human trials be carried out on patients with the spinal root injury known as brachial plexis avulsion - where the nerves to the arm are pulled out of the spinal cord - frequently as a result of car accidents.

    Sure would be nice to get my brachial plexis fixed for now. I take 1800mg of neurotin a day and my right arm still is in constant pain and falls asleep real easy.
    Disabled American Veteran
    USMC
    1985-

  4. #14
    [QUOTE=John39671]Prof Raisman is proposing that the first human trials be carried out on patients with the spinal root injury known as brachial plexis avulsion - where the nerves to the arm are pulled out of the spinal cord - frequently as a result of car accidents.
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    Sure would be nice to get my brachial plexis fixed for now. I take 1800mg of neurotin a day and my right arm still is in constant pain and falls asleep real easy.
    Disabled American Veteran
    USMC
    1985-

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by John39671
    Prof Raisman is proposing that the first human trials be carried out on patients with the spinal root injury known as brachial plexis avulsion - where the nerves to the arm are pulled out of the spinal cord - frequently as a result of car accidents.

    Sure would be nice to get my brachial plexis fixed for now. I take 1800mg of neurotin a day and my right arm still is in constant pain and falls asleep real easy.
    I was wondering if I would ever hear of anyone suffering from BPA. It sounds like a heinous injury.

  6. #16
    Some days it hurts like a son-of-a-biscut. But most of the time my meds keep it under conteol unless I get a UTI.
    Disabled American Veteran
    USMC
    1985-

  7. #17
    In response to an inquiry in another topic, I reviewed several recent studies on the abiity of olfactory ensheathing glia to stimulate re-entry of sensory axons into the spinal cord after rhizotomy (cutting of the spinal roots).

    http://carecure.org/forum/showpost.p...0&postcount=79

    Wise.

  8. #18
    Senior Member spidergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Olfactory ensheathing glial cells are not stem cells.

    Wise.
    haha i heard this 100,000x

    so cute.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Schmeky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carbar
    Prof Raisman is proposing that the first human trials be carried out on patients with the spinal root injury known as brachial plexis avulsion - where the nerves to the arm are pulled out of the spinal cord - frequently as a result of car accidents.
    I am glad he is applying this to brachial plexis injuries, however, all the hoopla in the past has been about SCI repair. Glad, but at the same time, a little disappointed.

    So, how many years will it be before he applies this to SCI?

  10. #20
    Prof Raisman has pioneered a technique which involves transplanting adult stem cells from the lining of the nose into the areas of injury in the spinal cord.
    Stem cells from the nose?

    The traditional scientific view has been that after damage to the brain or spinal cord the body had no ability to regenerate the connections. But Prof Raisman believes that after injury new nerve connections form automatically.
    Can connections form automatically ?

    A circuit is then reconnected, he says, to restore function or relearn, even if it is not correct.
    The aim is to repair spinal cord injury in humans by transplanting stem cells from the nasal lining called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) into the areas of injury. These cells are chosen because the nasal lining is the only area of the body where nerve fibres are known to be able to grow throughout adult life.
    Stem cells from OEC's?

    Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Olfactory ensheathing glial cells are not stem cells.
    I am confused
    Glider

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