Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: is an 8 hour foley ok?

  1. #1

    is an 8 hour foley ok?

    It sure would be nice to not have to cath every 4 hours. It would be great not having to find an attendant, find an accessible bathroom, and stop the fun while out doing whatever with friends. You know what I'm talkin' about. I'm preaching to the choir. So, is it ok to wear a foley for 8 hours. This would be especially great for work.

  2. #2
    What is your level of injury? Who does your cath the other 18 hours? Do you feel you must remain on intermittent cath? We don't recommend intermitten cath to patients who cannot cath themselves and have undependable help. It puts you at risk for high pressures and leakage and AD if the attendant does not show up, etc.

    While many people put in an indweling catheter every evening, I cannot recommend it. Remember that indwelling catheters should not be reused, and must be inserted with sterile technique. This could run into quite a bit of money, as most insurances would not buy you 30 new indwelling catheters and cath trays monthly.

    Occasional use of an indwelling catheter (for example for travel) is not a problem, but daily use should be avoided unless you plan to go with an indwelling catheter 24/7.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    SCI Nurse,
    I am a c-5 quad. Attendants help me cath every 4-5 hours.

  4. #4
    I know several males with a C5 injury who cath themselves using a flexor hinge splint. Have you explored this?

    Suzy, for those with high level tetraplegia who cannot cath themselve, we generally recommend an indwelling catheter just for this reason...inability to cath yourself. We know it is not realistic to expect all but weathly people to have 24/7 attendant care, and even if you have it, there is always the risk that they don't show up. An indwelling catheter is safer than uncontrolled AD or bladder overdistension, as long as you are carefully screened on a regular basis for the complications of indwelling catheter use.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    I do not have the dexterity to cath myself. I thought indwelling was no longer recommended due to the increased risk of uti.

  6. #6
    Indwelling catheters still have their place. As above, there are also potential dangerous in intermittent cath if you are unable to do it yourself.

    (KLD)

  7. #7
    There are also documented cases of increased risk of bladder cancer for long term use of indwelling caths. I would listen to whatever KLD and Dr. Young have to say, you are in the best of hands there.

  8. #8
    I meant to say documented studies.....

  9. #9
    Yes, this is one of the downsides of indwelling catheters. They increase the risks for serious UTIs, kidney deterioration, stones and bladder cancer. I have lost a number of patients over the years to bladder cancer. Squamous cell and adenocarcinoma are more common than the transitional cell carcinoma found in ABs. These types are not effected much by radiation or chemo, so generally bladder removal is the only treatment.

    After 5 years, we start screening for bladder cancer with urine cytology studies annually, and after 10 years we recommend annual bladder biopsies, although this latter is controversial.

    Regardless, you can die from AD if you are intermittent cath and are unable to get cathed on time or if you have unexpected AD, so intermittent cath is not always a safe option for someone with a higher level of injury.

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 04-09-2006 at 06:51 PM.

  10. #10
    Thank God, I have great helpers and am cathed regularly. So, is the answer "no" to my original question?

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-23-2006, 02:24 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-25-2005, 07:20 PM
  3. spastic bladder and foley cat
    By cauteo in forum Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-05-2002, 08:48 PM
  4. foley cat
    By cauteo in forum Care
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-21-2002, 05:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •