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Thread: New Device Helping Spinal Cord Injuries.

  1. #1

    New Device Helping Spinal Cord Injuries.

    TOPIX.NET Spinal Cord Injuries Alert.


    New Device Helping Spinal Cord Injuries

    David Scott
    Reporting


    (CBS 42) Typically spinal cord injuries are very difficult to treat and many times, the damage is permanent. But, a new device is helping the spine heal-- by cooling it down.

    When Miami police officer Manuel Gomez fell from his police horse, he couldn't feel a thing from the neck down.

    "It’s incredible I thought I was never going to walk again," Gomez said.

    He didn't sever the spinal cord, but it was crushed and the paralysis could have been permanent.

    "A complete injury at that level, he'd have no arm function, no leg function," said Dr. Steve Vanni with Jackson Memorial Hospital.

    But just weeks later, Gomez is back on his feet thanks to a new device called Coolgard 3000.

    During the procedure a catheter is inserted through one of the blood vessels in the groin. When blood passes over the catheter it's cooled-- dropping the body's temperature from a normal 98.6 degrees to approximately 91 degrees.

    That chill drops swelling in the spinal cord and minimizes damage.

    "The speed of his recovery and the amount of his recovery he has made over such a short period--is remarkable," Jackson said.

    Gomez faces months of rehab but hopes he'll one day be back on the beat.

    The Coolgard 3000 is currently being used to treat neurological injuries, but it is also being investigated for heart attack patients, where cooling could minimize permanent damage to the heart.

    (© MMVI, CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved.)

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    David Scott
    Reporting

  2. #2
    Hi Manouli,
    I looked up this article and found the video that shows officer Gomez in recovery.
    http://keyetv.com/topstories/local_story_079213252.html
    I would like Dr Young or SCI Nurse to give a feed back.
    Should this procedure be included in ER or hospitals codes for newly injured? The article gives a great hope to minimize damage to the cord in earlier periods after the injury.
    Dr Young: I would like to push for that to be part of the cure for SCI if it work, will you investigate the effectiveness please?.
    God Bless
    ace

  3. #3

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by ace
    Hi Manouli,
    I looked up this article and found the video that shows officer Gomez in recovery.
    http://keyetv.com/topstories/local_story_079213252.html
    I would like Dr Young or SCI Nurse to give a feed back.
    Should this procedure be included in ER or hospitals codes for newly injured? The article gives a great hope to minimize damage to the cord in earlier periods after the injury.
    Dr Young: I would like to push for that to be part of the cure for SCI if it work, will you investigate the effectiveness please?.
    God Bless
    ace
    Thank you ACE, that was a very nice of you, and you must have a big heart to care for others. Blees Your Heart,manouli.

  4. #4
    Hi Manouli,
    No problem.
    I am a peer councelor at our SCI center, and I'd like to have as much informations as I can, to help others. I wish Dr. Young would post his view on this. It could be very important in someone's life. We know how different life could be with a little more gains. I just hope he takes time to post.
    Thank you very much for bringing this thread.
    God Bless
    ace

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by manouli
    Thank you ACE, that was a very nice of you, and you must have a big heart to care for others. Blees Your Heart,manouli.
    Manouli,

    Hypothermic treatment of the spinal cord is not new and has been around since the 1970's. Local hypothermia is frequently used in operating rooms when the spinal cord is open.

    Jackson Memorial Hospital is associated with the Miami Project and they have been working on hypothermia for more than a decade. I am glad that they now have a device to cool the spinal cord intravascularly. It looks and sounds promising.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    Dr. Young,
    Thank you very much for your post. Would you think that this procedure will bemore common in ER's all over the country? How long would you say it will be for that to happen?
    Thank you
    God Bless

  7. #7
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Both my surgeries were conducted in a converted morgue in the basement of the hospital. The temp inside the freezer turned operating room was 40 something degrees. Everyone in the room was dressed like they were going dog sledding. It really freaked me out....the large stainless door with the pull lever opener. It's giving me chills just thinking about it again...
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ace
    Dr. Young,
    Thank you very much for your post. Would you think that this procedure will bemore common in ER's all over the country? How long would you say it will be for that to happen?
    Thank you
    God Bless
    I don't know what the device is approved for, whether the data has been published, and what the FDA will require to get the device approved for acute spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by stlyin moe
    Both my surgeries were conducted in a converted morgue in the basement of the hospital. The temp inside the freezer turned operating room was 40 something degrees. Everyone in the room was dressed like they were going dog sledding. It really freaked me out....the large stainless door with the pull lever opener. It's giving me chills just thinking about it again...
    Stlyin moe, WOW! Was it helpfull for you at the end? What was your condition, and was it right way after you got hurt? ty,manouli.

  10. #10
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    I really don't know manouli. I waited a week before the first surgery. I did get the steriod methylpredlisone (sp?) right away then for days till my surgery I was roasting. I was so hot I was sweating profusely and the room had to be cooled to 60 degrees and fans directed at me before I'd cool down. People coming in to visit me had to wear winter coats to stay warm.

    I really can't tell you why they did the surgery in such cold but I'm still here so it must have worked. I don't think this has anything to do with it but I was told to expect a very nasty staph infection after the surgery. It never happened.
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

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