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Thread: They knew someone else’s child would die for 2-month-old Kayla to live.

  1. #1

    They knew someone else’s child would die for 2-month-old Kayla to live.

    After you read this story, tell me how you feel about using leftovers from ivf clinics, slated to die and be trashed without being used to help those in need of a life saving cure.

    THE TRANSPLANT TALE OF TWO INFANTS
    Living testaments
    Rare operation pays off at Children’s
    Friday, February 03, 2006
    Misti Crane
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH
    • Domino donor Complete coverage of the rare transplant from The Dispatch, WBNS-10TV and ONN
    DAN SMITH | CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL Dr. Todd Astor, right, Children’s Hospital’s lung and heart-lung transplant programs director, tests Jason Wolfe’s new lungs along with transplant coordinator Karen Nicholas, center, and cardiac intensive-care nurse Katy Huber. DAN SMITH | CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL Rebecca Lovins, mother of Kayla Richardson, gets support from her husband, Robert Richardson, right, and Maria and Michael Wolfe at a news conference. Kayla Richardson, 2 months, recovers in Children’s cardiac intensive-care unit. DAN SMITH | CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL PHOTOS Maria Wolfe holds her son Jason for the first time Wednesday. Jason, 3• months, underwent a 14-hour heart-and-lungs transplant Jan. 14, and his original heart became a gift of life to tiny Kayla Richardson.

    When they prayed, Kayla Richardson’s parents could not ask for the one thing that would save their only child’s life.
    They knew someone else’s child would die for 2-month-old Kayla to live.
    Rather than praying for a heart transplant, Rebecca Lovins and Robert Richardson just asked for Kayla to be OK.
    "That was probably the hardest — the waiting. We just didn’t stand straight," Mr. Richardson said.
    They watched as a machine did the work for her heart and lungs. They prepared themselves for the possibility of losing her. They decided they’d donate her healthy organs if the time came.
    A few doors down from Kayla’s Children’s Hospital room, 3 ½- month-old Jason Wolfe awaited a heart and lungs. His parents, Maria and Michael, thought they’d taken a healthy baby home from the hospital last autumn.
    In late December, Jason was spitting up and his skin began to gray. They took him to Fairfield Medical Center. By Jan. 2, they were at Children’s, where they quickly had Jason baptized and held vigil at his side.
    Doctors said a heart-lung transplant was his only option.
    Like Kayla’s parents, they’d decided to donate their child’s healthy organs if he didn’t make it.
    Without transplants, neither would survive much longer. Doctors had used the word weeks and knew that it was more likely the babies would die waiting.
    For their part, both sets of parents were marking their lives in days, some better, some worse, some terrifying.
    But on Jan. 13, Children’s doctors heard news of a possible donor for Jason.
    And what had for several days been a remote possibility in a few doctors’ minds became real.
    A domino transplant: rare, even rarer in children, and never pulled off in babies this young.
    Jason was getting a heart and lungs because that type of operation was preferable to a lung-only transplant in a baby so small.
    But his heart was actually quite healthy.
    On top of that, he had type O blood, meaning he could donate to anyone, including Kayla.
    After talking to both sets of parents and meeting with hospital administrators, the transplant teams went ahead with a tandem operation that had not been done in the U.S. for a decade.
    "This was their only chance," said Dr. Timothy Hoffman, director of the hospital’s hearttransplant and heart-failure programs.
    "These children are the sickest that come our way."
    In surgeries that began early Jan. 14 and spanned 12 hours, both babies’ lives shifted from fragile to promising.
    Jason received a heart and lungs from an anonymous outof-state donor. Dr. Mark Galantowicz, chief of cardiothoracic surgery, removed the baby’s ailing lungs and still-strong heart and implanted the new organs.
    The transplant team prepped Jason’s heart just as they would that of an organ donor who had died. They put it on ice in a cooler.
    But instead of putting it on a helicopter or plane to save the life of a baby in another town, they carried it across the hall.
    Three hours and 16 minutes passed between the last heartbeat in Jason’s chest and the first in Kayla’s.

    http://www.columbusdispatch.com/news...203-A1-03.html
    Last edited by bigbob; 02-03-2006 at 10:05 AM.
    Don't ignore the Reeve Legacy, Remember he and Dana supported open research and fought hard for ESCR

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  2. #2
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbob
    After you read this story, tell me how you feel about using leftovers from ivf clinics, slated to die and be trashed without being used to help those in need of a life saving cure.
    Yeah, which position would be more Pro-Life?

    A. Let the baby die without helping to save the life of the other baby

    OR

    B. Transplant tissue from the "dead" baby to help save the life of the other baby


    It's clear that the parents of the baby who donated the tissue are the ultimate of Pro-Life here. As hard as it was for them to say goodbye, to their own baby it must have been comforting to know that their baby saved the life of another baby.

    What a great gift of Life.

    "There’s far too much unthinking respect given to authority,” Molly Ivins explained; “What you need is sustained outrage.”
    Kerr, Keirstead, McDonald, Stice and Jun Yan courageously work on ESCR to Cure SCI.

    Divisiveness comes from not following Christopher Reeve's ESCR lead.
    Young does ASCR.
    [I]I do not tear down CRPA, I ONLY make peopl

  3. #3
    BigBob,

    This is an interesting and important article. However, I want to point out that posting an article in its entirety with pictures here on our forums opens us up to lawsuits. Although we are an educational site and therefore allowed by law to post excerpts of articles for discussion and education, wholesale copying of articles including pictures violates copyright rules and exposes us to lawsuits.

    In the future, please try to post excepts of articles, even a picture or two, summarize the rest, explain why it is important, and provide the URL so that people can go and see the rest from the originating site. There are some exceptions to this rule. For example, the material may be a press release or public domain information from government sources, or you have permission from the source to post it on this site.

    Thanks.

    Wise.

  4. #4
    Dr. Young, please click the link and you will notice that I left out about half of the article. I thought I was acting in accordance to your prescribed posting rules. I never would want to abuse them.

    But, as you say the article is very interesting, I would assume on many facets, what comes to mind is scientific, the ingenious strategy the doctors worked out, the emotional feelings of the donors and recipients, and how it relates to stem cell research. Any comments Dr. Young would be welcome.
    Don't ignore the Reeve Legacy, Remember he and Dana supported open research and fought hard for ESCR

    StemCellBattles

    Support H.R. 810

  5. #5
    After you read this story, tell me how you feel about using leftovers from ivf clinics, slated to die and be trashed without being used to help those in need of a life saving cure.
    Don't ignore the Reeve Legacy, Remember he and Dana supported open research and fought hard for ESCR

    StemCellBattles

    Support H.R. 810

  6. #6
    Before reading this amazing account..God bless these doctors..I didn't think the excess cells should be destroyed.
    Life isn't about getting thru the storm but learning to dance in the rain.

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