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Thread: Hip 'dropped'?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Cspine's Avatar
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    I sleep on my back and my leg curls up at night, would sleeping on my stomach help the alignment? The tread about sleping that way there is talk of hip stretching.
    Death and taxes

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Cspine
    My right leg tends to frog leg/rotate out ad my hip has 'dropped'. I don't know what caused it or anything but it makes my right side sit lower and so my posture is whacked out.
    Ive got the same issue.Im actually hoping a narrower chair will help,it feels to me anyways like i have one ass cheek sitting in the dip and other one not..so it causes the rest of me to lean that way..

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cspine's Avatar
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    My seat fits snug and I still have issues. I'm doin a pressure map thing tomorrow.
    Death and taxes

  4. #14
    I think chaning posiiton and stretching those muscles and tendons while lying on your front (we call it prone) if it was comfortable for a while each day would be good because of the change in position and gravity. I know it wouldn't make it worse.
    I wouldn't advise trying to sleep all night like that at first. You would have to see if you ar ecomfortable and build up to that amount. Start out with 30 minutes to 1 hour a day. Make sure it doesn't interfere with respirations or anything.

    CWO

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Cspine
    My right leg tends to frog leg/rotate out ad my hip has 'dropped'. I don't know what caused it or anything but it makes my right side sit lower and so my posture is whacked out. PT wants to just give me a coushion that is built up on that side but it seems to me that will make me sit straight but it won't fix my hip! What should I do?
    Cspine, there are several causes for a "dropped" hip.
    • Tilted pelvis. A common cause is a tilted pelvis that occurs as a result of a spinal curvature. If for example, you develop a curve of the spine in one direction, in order to site straight, the lower part of the spinal will curve in the other direction. That is why most spinal curvatures are "S-shaped". When that happens, your pelvis may be tilted. The way to deal with this is to change the seat to accommodate the tilt in the pelvis.
    • Dislocated hip. A hip dislocation occurs when the ball of the hip joint comes out of its socket. It can come out of the socket posteriorly (90%), anteriorly, or through a fractured acetabulum (the hip socket). The hip joint is held in place by ligaments and muscles, as well as the position of the legs. With muscle atrophy and situations, your muscles are weak and ligaments may not be strong enough to hold the hip joint in the socket. When your legs are straight with knees together, that is the position where it is most likely to pop out, if you have weak ligaments and muscles holding the joint in. Orthopedic surgeons sometimes put traction on to put the legs in a position to reduce the opportunity for the joint to pop out and wait for the ligaments and muscles to heal.
    • Avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This is when the head of the femur (the thigh bone) degenerates due to ischemia or from long term steroid use. This often happens with a traumatic hip dislocation that tears the joint and the blood vessels, and damage to the bone. An MRI is the most sensitive diagnostic tool for visualizing avascular necrosis. Treatment is most commonly by replacement of the femoral head with a prosthesis.

    You need to find out what the situation is with your hip, work with a good orthopedic surgeon to come up with an appropriate solution. As recently as a decade ago, many surgeons are reluctant to repair hip problems in people with spinal cord injury because of the notion that they will not be using the hip for walking. However, this is changing.

    Wise.

  6. #16
    I have a similar problem. I started using night splints to keep my legs from contracting and it stretches my legs straight all night. I don't lean to any side any more, and it took time but eventually got to point were the splint will not have to work as hard to keep the legs stretched straight. It helps a lot specially because my left leg is always rotated to the outside and I use the splint to keep it looking good.
    Night splints are very commonly used in nursing homes. That might help you or your Dr to know which one to use. They are very hard to wear them by myself as I have very little balance control, but If you can get someone to help you it will be a wonderful thing. I hope -like I- you will like them.
    God Bless
    Ace

  7. #17
    Senior Member Niese's Avatar
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    I have this problem. Mine is a mixture of loosing more weight on one side and scoliosis. It took quite awhile for them to catch mine which has caused more problems. But I would listen to your therapist and get your cushion built up. Yes it may not fix the immediate problem but it will stop other problems from occuring. Trust me from my experiences you don't want it to get worse. If you have had someone notice the problem and are willing to help you fix it take the opportunity. I have had the run around and I swear everyday the pain gets worse.

  8. #18
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    I am sitting "whacked out" too, But I'm, not sure what it is.

    Every morning when I get into my chair I can't bend forward, until I crack either my hip or lower back, It's like I'm restricted. I have to hook my hands under my chair and pull myself down until I hear a loud clunk/snap which is worrying.

    When I'm laid in bed my feet positions are out too. My left foot is at the 12 o'clock and my right foot at 3 o'clock |_ . The pain is bad too.

    Is my hip dislocated?

  9. #19
    Hi, I just found out I have a fractured right pelvis, femur head broke off...Dr. answer was this is really bad, "NO WAY TO FIX" as bones are too thin and it will just keep degrading. Right leg rotates out and leg is an 1 inch or too shorter,femur on inside of right knee pushes hard against the skin and looks like a pinkish knob. Healed femur fracture area. No pain but intense sweating on a 1 foot by 2 foot area of my right side only. Dr. says there is no fix and was more concerned the sweating was due to fecal mass waiting to be evacuated. Do you know of any hip doctors in the 90503 area of Calif? Do you feel a second opinion is called for? No pain meds, and figure it is about 3-4 month old fracture and has worn the pelvic area a bit.
    Helga

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