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Thread: Loss of Blood to spine?

  1. #1

    Loss of Blood to spine?

    I cut my main artery to my spine from a car accident, causing my nerves to die from about the T-11 area down. Does anybody know what the medical definition for this kind of injury is? Is there any type of new treatment or information available?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Do a search on this site on eschemic injuries and you will get alot of good info.

  3. #3
    When you do your search, I think it's spelled ischemic.

  4. #4
    Essentially has the same effect as a spinal cord injury which unfortunately there is no known cure.

    The introduction of the blood kills the central nerves. I have heard that even one drop of blood introduced into the wrong area can do a great amount of damage.

    "Life is about how you
    respond to not only the
    challenges you're dealt but
    the challenges you seek...If
    you have no goals, no
    mountains to climb, your
    soul dies".~Liz Fordred

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    As a result of an Aorto rupture in a MVA, i also suffered loss of blood supply to the T10 level of my spine - it's called a
    Spinal Infarct.Unfortunately, there is no medical treatment/cure that i know of at this point in time.

  6. #6
    PTBest,

    The major artery from the heart to the lower body is the aorta. In humans, a branch from the aorta called the Artery of Adamkiewiscz feeds the anterior spinal artery that supplies the anterior and gray matter in the lower spinal cord. Occlusion of this artery (due to a aortic artery rupture or a dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, and the repair of the artery) for periods longer than 30 minutes will lead to damage of cells, particularly neurons, in the lower thoracic spinal cord.

    I want to emphasize that ischemia of the spinal cord, of the type that you describe, does not necessarily damage all the cells in the lower spinal cord. In particular, the dorsal root ganglia that send sensory fibers from the body into the spinal cord and to the brain often survive. Second, spinal fibers or axons are relatively resistant to ischemia (loss of blood flow) and many or most probably survived. Third, ischemia is unlikely to have produced complete loss of all neurons in the lower spinal cord. Some interneurons and motoneurons are likely to have survived the injury. Furthermore, we know that there are stem cells in the spinal cord and there is a possibility that the stem cells are producing new cells.

    What does this mean in terms of therapy? Because ischemia primarily damages neurons int the lower spinal cord, therapies that replace neurons should be helpful. Note that you may not need as much regenerative therapy which directed at regrowing axons. The therapies that are most likely to beneficial for ischemic damage to the spinal cord are
    • stem cell transplants, growth factors that stimulate endogenous stem cells to grow and produce new neurons.
    • remyelination. Please note that loss of cells may include oligodendroglia that myelinate the spinal cord. If you have demyelination, you may benefit from 4-aminopyridine and also therapies that remyelinate the spinal cord.
    • reversing "learned non-use". You may have significant "learned non-use", i.e. neural circuits turning off because they have not been used for months. If so, you may benefit from intensive ambulatory training.

    Sorry about using esoteric words and concepts. Please ask questions and I will try to expand on the above.

    Wise.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the all the info. Dr Young, A couple of things I didn't completely understand on your reply.

    • remyelination. Please note that loss of cells may include oligodendroglia that myelinate the spinal cord. If you have demyelination, you may benefit from 4-aminopyridine and also therapies that remyelinate the spinal cord.


    I did try and take 4-aminopyridine for about month and half without any improvement. How do you know if you have demyelination or not? Are there remyelination therapies currently available?

    * In particular, the dorsal root ganglia that send sensory fibers from the body into the spinal cord and to the brain often survive.

    If the dorsal root ganglia survived, shouldn't I have sensation below my injury level?

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