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Thread: Medication for spastic bladder

  1. #1

    Medication for spastic bladder

    Hello friends,

    I,m a paraplegic using inner folley catheter since 1995.I sometimes,ve to experience A.D like symptoms (headach etc.) while inserting new catheter.Can I use following medicines?Will they help me prevent such problems?If someone,ve used them or have some infos. plz. share.I,m in extreme need of infos.Thanks.

    1)Ditopan
    2)Ditrol
    3)Oxybutinin

  2. #2
    Those meds are used to relax the bladder so that it can hold more urine.

    Have you tried using the lidocaine (xylocaine) gel prior to insertion of your catheter? YOu inject, wait approximately 5-10 minutes then insert the catheter.
    This is an anesthetic agent which will deaden the nerves. Also, be sure to use more lubricant in case this is the cause of the irritation causing your headaches.

    CWO

  3. #3
    Senior Member reedyd's Avatar
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    spastic bladder

    you might try diazepam and/or valium to help you relax your body
    there is a skeletal muscle relaxer called Baclofen for Spasticity
    your hesdaxhes are probably caused from high blood pressure
    from dysreflexia

    Definition: Autonomic dysreflexia occurs in people with spinal cord injury above the 6th thoracic vertebral level. It is a sudden rise in blood pressure, due to an overreaction in the body.

    Autonomic dysreflexia can be life threatening, so immediate medical attention will be required if this occurs. The symptoms are:

    sweating
    sudden rise in blood pressure
    flushing
    shivering
    headache
    nausea
    goose bumps
    slowed heartbeat
    constricted pupils
    blurred vision
    nasal congestion
    restlessness.

    The good news is that autonomic dysreflexia tends to lessen over time, after the initial onset of spinal cord injury has passed.




    god luck to you

  4. #4
    The good news is that autonomic dysreflexia tends to lessen over time, after the initial onset of spinal cord injury has passed.
    This is definitely NOT true for the vast majority of people with SCI, in fact for many, AD gets worse with aging. The best reference for AD prevention and management is here:

    Autonomic Dysreflexia: What You Should Know

    Also, this is incorrect:
    Autonomic dysreflexia occurs in people with spinal cord injury above the 6th thoracic vertebral level.
    AD occurs most in those with injuries at or above T6 spinal cord, not veterbral level, but has been reported in those with injuries as low as T10, and also can occur in those with MS.

    (KLD)
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 12-15-2006 at 10:10 AM.

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