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Thread: RTX in dogs

  1. #1

    RTX in dogs

    NIH is reporting RTX successful in dogs. As I understand it, the model was for peripheral nerve compression by cancer, kind of like a rhizotomy. Article at painoniine.com

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by dejerine
    NIH is reporting RTX successful in dogs. As I understand it, the model was for peripheral nerve compression by cancer, kind of like a rhizotomy. Article at painoniine.com
    Interesting. RTX is raltitrexed, a anti-folate thymidylate synthetase inhibitor, used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Diarrhea is a significant side effect. Interestingly, patients who have tumors that express high levels of thymidylate synthetase do not respond to this drug. http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.or...stract/9/2/792

  3. #3
    Apologies to Dr. Young Sorry, should have spelled out resiniferatoxin, another RTX. This ought to keep the pharmacists on their toes.

  4. #4
    Dear. Dr. Young,

    I ran across an article about other problems with abbreviations. They can make things FUBAR (fouled up beyond recognition) It seems that early in the British Navy there was a furious debate about who got to use the title ch after their name. The chaplains wanted it and also the surgeons for chirurgia. So both used it for a while, and back that far you usually needed a chaplain after surgery anyway. There is also said to have been an error during WWII with an abbreviation The "m" in the message meant Meridies, or noon, but the telegrapher thought it stood for male and hung onto the note. IMHO it is good we don't use any abbreviations on the internet, or else more misunderstandings would follow.

    I am trying not to compare A2O, and to always serve ABCD. My friend says he flies Alitalia, which means Airline lands in Turin and Luggage in Ancona. In Texas where I grew up they used to say BHNC (big hat no cattle) Also there are a couple supplied by my doctor "BUNDY" (but unfortunately not dead yet) and "GOMER" (get out of my emergency room). The students at the local medical school supplied "MSD", for "musculoskeletal dysproportion" or in other words "ugly". LOL
    Last edited by dejerine; 01-23-2006 at 04:53 AM.

  5. #5
    Here's an article about resiniferatoxin from 2004 talking about success with dogs and rats:
    http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/may2004/nidcr-03.htm

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