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Thread: !5 minute Dr visit ??

  1. #1
    Member juliez's Avatar
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    !5 minute Dr visit ??

    On Thursday, I have an initial visit with a new Rehab doctor. I have quite a lengthy list issues I wish to address, but I have only been allowed 15 minutes. Is this a common practice? What tactic should I take? It has been over 8 years since my last visit with a specialist? Yes, this is a new doctor. I'm open to any suggestions. Thanks, juliez

  2. #2
    Senior Member Clipper's Avatar
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    Find a doctor who is willing to spend time with you. This could be a sign of how this doctor operates. You might try expressing your concerns to whomever schedules appointments, and with the doctor's nurse. If this doesn't get you anywhere, look elsewhere.

  3. #3
    Clipper is right; 15 minutes for an initial visit is ridiculous. When you made the appointment, did you bring up the fact that it's been so long since your last eval, and that you have questions? It could be that whoever's scheduling appointments is just 'going by the book'.

    You could always park your chair in the front of the door and not let the doc out til he/she answers your questions!

    Is this at a rehab center or a private doc? Just curious.

    It also could be (just playing devil's advocate here) that you get to the appointment, maybe end up waiting for your appointment, and then the doc spends more than the 'alloted' time with you. That's happened to us, lots. I know they schedule the doc tight, and then she takes up to a half hour or 45 minutes; the secretaries are fuming, but she doesn't pay any attention. That's why I asked the question about the rehab center, where the secretaries aren't really working for the docs, but for the institution, and the docs don't really have any say in how long the appointments are.

    But Clipper is right - if it truly is the case that the doc only gives you 15 minutes, give 'em the back of your chair and find someone who will take the time to listen.

    Good Luck!

    _____________
    Tough times don't last - tough people do.

  4. #4
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    Who are you going to see?

  5. #5
    Senior Member ~Patrick~'s Avatar
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    well lets see, they will bill you $75 for the visit. Thats $300 an hour. I say sit in front of the door until you ask all your questions. I would also start by saying "I came to you due to all the high recommendations and I hope you dont mind but I have alot of questions". They love to hear how everybody loves them. lol

    "Nyquil - The stuffy, sneezy,
    why-the-heck-is-the-room-spinning medicine."

  6. #6
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    try having all your questions written down, tell the doc these are what you need to go over and cross them off as answered. it's always a good idea to jot a note on the answers anyway, since you are generally rushed out. the first rehab doc we had would only address one question at a time! our present doc not only goes down the list with us, he sends his written notes to us for reference and other docs, also to make sure all is correct. that's service! if you only have one rehab specialist in your area, obviously you can only push so hard. they make more money with more appts. having the notes from the visit is dynamite for us, now we ask the other docs to do the same. all they have to do is tell the transcriptionist to make an extra copy.

  7. #7
    Sad but true, 15 minutes is the normal amount of time allotted by the health care system for a visit. You might try sending your doctor the list of questions, and then asking for an appointment to deal with them. And ask for a long appointment. It wasn't the doctor who scheduled the appointment length it was his receptionist. The written communication is a way of going around the front office person to get what you need. I personally send faxes to my doctor and that actually helps a lot to smooth out this kind of problem

    RAB

  8. #8
    Member juliez's Avatar
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    Thanks for the help. I have a long list of questions and a longer list of issues to be address and I plan to block the door until these have resolved to my satisfaction. I'm not impress with the medical community here in Florida. I was from Vermont and while it was hard to get to medical service, the doctors took their time and treated you with concern and understanding. Well, who knows, perhaps, this doctor will be the same. I realize that it was her receptionist I spoke to, not her.
    Thanks again for the input and I'll fill you on the visit. Julie

  9. #9
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    i most cases

    it's just the way they schedule, my wife works for a dr. and they usually spend varying amounts of time with each patient. usually depending on the needs of the patient. don't be too startled by this, just be prepared to ask all you want to know, if you have to write your questions down. if your not happy with your visit you can always seek a different dr. bob

  10. #10

    email...

    I have found that emailing the questions in ahead of time works. Snail mail works, too. And I guess faxes would work, too.

    But the key is to send the questions in ahead of time and show up with your list to take notes.

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