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Thread: Leg/back massaging of sorts~

  1. #1
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    Leg/back massaging of sorts~

    I've asked about massage applied to areas below injury site in the past. Understanding the risks of blood clots as well as benefits, what of a leg massage/squeeze type machine now for sale but damned if I can remember what it's called at this time...(it's squeezing reminded me of the machine applied to my son's legs while in nicu...wasn't that to avoid bloodclots?)
    Anyhoo, being that kid is post three coming up four years, hasn't worn or been in need of teds since first month or so of injury, no swelling, etc. has the opinion changed around here about massage of sorts applied below the injury?
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

  2. #2
    Sequential compression hose are used during the acute phase when the person is on bedrest to prevent blood statis which can add to DVT risk. We stop using them once the person is up in the chair going to therapy, since studies indicate that left off for a hour or more, a clot can develop, and then break off to form an embolus if the pumps are then reapplied.

    I would not recommend the use of any sequential compression hose for someone with a chronic SCI without appropriate tests (usually a Doppler flow study) to assure that there is not already a silent DVT going on. The same criteria would apply to manual massage to the legs.

    (KLD)

  3. #3
    SCI-Nurse: do the risks of DVT/embolism significantly decrease with increased movement/exercise/ambulation? I'm able to move my hip, knee and some ankle muscles. I've been somewhat massaging my feet, calves, legs, etc. Is this risky behavior?

    Should I be asking my doc for a Doppler flow study?
    Daniel

  4. #4
    If you are walking, your risks for DVT drop significantly. If not, and/or you are within the first 3-6 months post injury, you should definately talk with your SCI physician prior to doing any leg massage.

    (KLD)

  5. #5
    Senior Member Jadis's Avatar
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    What about someone in my case? I get a leg/back massage nightly.

  6. #6
    What value do you see in the massage? What kind of massage are we talking about: kneading, long smooth strokes (usually called effleurage), percussion or vibration? This could make a difference in my answer.

    RAB

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jadis's Avatar
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    It helps with the pain and the spasms. Kneading and deep tissue probably best describe it. He also does reflexology on my feet.

  8. #8
    One good thing about spasms is that they help to prevent blood clots. If you've been doing this for a while, it should be OK, but it's not without some small risk.

    RAB

  9. #9
    Senior Member Jadis's Avatar
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    Yes, it's been going on for as long as I've known him--since 1998. The first accident was 6 months before we met.

    When my son was learning to walk and was very active in his walker/johnny jumper, he used to cry at night. I would rub his legs and back out so he could fall asleep.

    When I am overly active, I have pain in my legs and lower back, which reminds me of my son at that age. When Boog rubs out my legs and back, it helps calm them so i can sleep.

  10. #10
    Senior Member teesieme's Avatar
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    TY for the interest and questions that follow with inquiry of everyone.

    In my son's situation it would be a therapeutic over the counter type machine I tried in JCP, something one can either have legs on top of or in a U type area for each leg giving a slight massaging squeeze, still can't think of what it is called, reasonable though, under $50 at this time.

    Anyhow, in my son's case, he does walk with leg braces every other day, otherwise standing or using a Scitrainer1 the other days. He has consistant spasms and somewhat controlled spasms, he brings on to stretch out or otherwise most of the time. He uses an e-stim as part of his daily or every other day pt program. I think a benefit of massage for the majority of would be circulation as well, perhaps I am wrong. Early on the fear of clots made us decide to install a jacuzzi type tub instead but we no longer have that available and his hot/cold sensation has returned to a decent point with time.

    Through these past three years, I have been trying to strive towards affordable equipment and what have you my son will be able to use independently, without the need of services/assistance/prescriptions, thus my inquiry of this product.

    TY for your time. ~ Teresa
    "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

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