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Thread: career

  1. #11
    Sorry joey... just real quick to rdf--

    No, there may be other programs to recieve credentials, then teach, but what I am referring to are programs that pay you teaching salary while you make a 2 year commitment to teach at a disadvantaged school, or where teachers are extremely in need. While teaching during this 2 yr commitment, you earn your Masters degree . The classroom is 'in the field' training. So if you were planning to teach, you are thrown into the pit right pretty much right away. I have some concerns about this, but depending on one's level of commitment, it could work for some. Yes, look into it

    Joey, I'm looking forward to hearing more about what type of experience and/or prep you've had with students in the classroom, or if this is something you will be doing soon, per your plan or teaching program you may now be going into?

    As others have stated, if you have the love and passion for teaching, especially working with kids at the middle/high school level, you will do good.

  2. #12
    thanks for the responses. just needed some support. i am recently employed as a substitute, but i'm still undergoing paperwork, so i haven't started yet. as a math teacher, i can probably get a full time job before getting my credentials (which i am starting in january). LA school district is a bit intimidating (2nd largest in the nation). i think subbing will provide good introductory experience, however i will not have the benefit of setting up a routine classroom (getting around among the desks can be tough).

    anywho...aside from the sci thing (which i'm not really that worried about) is the fact that i'm only 22, so i feel kinda like i'm still a kid myself. i don't remember ever having a teacher under 30. so, it will be interesting how the students respond.

    well thanks again, i'll update, though it may take a while to have any substance to add.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by chick
    So if you were planning to teach, you are thrown into the pit right pretty much right away. I have some concerns about this, but depending on one's level of commitment, it could work for some. Yes, look into it
    this is the debate running through my head as well. like i said i can (relatively easily here in super crowded LA) get a job right away. however, although i know math, i do not "know" teaching, so i'm not sure if i'm ready to dive in or not.

  4. #14
    Never mind math, teaching from a chair, the size of LA....if you're brave enough to sub in junior high, YOU DA MAN!!! There are some jobs I will not do, and teaching jr high is top of the list. More power to you

  5. #15
    Joey, I understand where you are now a little better. It can seem like a daunting job/experience not having had the preparation and direct work experience with students, before forging right into a school. I can see how being so young yourself and not so far removed from high school aged students age, that it can be pretty intimidating, especially being now an authority figure with your position as a teacher. However, being closer in age and possibly being able to relate better, or even if that is just perception of students, may be used to your advantage. Having and maintaining boundaries is critical though.

    As far as the teaching goes, have you considered a more formal education/teaching program to hone your skills and understanding of students needs, as well as aquiring/developing those basic socialization, development, psycho-social, and other issues relevant to working with children/adolescents? I believe that teaching involves much more than simply presenting a subject material to students. No matter how knowledgeable and skilled one may be on a subject area, teaching and imparting that knowledge to others, especially children, is a special skill not everyone may be able to do naturally, but is a skill that can be learned and developed.

  6. #16
    Joey,your only regret will be if you don't try it. The kids will accept you.

  7. #17
    I think that you should go for it. The subbing thing first sounds like a good idea, although be prepared, they'll think they can get away with a lot more. All kids torture substitutes.

    And when you become a full-time teacher and have kids of your 'own' so to speak, just be honest and yourself. I think Aly is right. Kids can pick up on a person's weaknesses and feed off them. If you are confident with yourself and your teaching, they'll respect you, chair or not. And who knows...you could very well be that one teacher that touches a lot of kids.

    Good luck.
    If there is light
    it will find
    you

    --Charles Bukowski

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeyMearig
    i don't remember ever having a teacher under 30.
    You probably did...remember as a kid everyone seems so much older than they actually are. Remember back to elementary school? Those big scary old people were quite possibly really young haha. If it makes you feel any better, every student teacher and young professional out there is in your same boat. Also, in my high school I remember the younger teachers being a hit with the students because they were more 'with it'. Just remember to be a professional and draw the line between being 'cool' and appropreate and you should be fine.

    And heck with powerpoint and overheads you dont even have to worry about being able to write on the top half of the board anymore

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by CurlieQCarrie
    And who knows...you could very well be that one teacher that touches a lot of kids.

    Good luck.
    Errrrrrr Carrie.....I'm pretty sure they aren't allowed to do that.....lol

    Seriously Joey.....the only barrier is in your head. If you can engage a class you can do it standing up or sitting down.....go for it
    C5/6 incomplete

    "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

  10. #20
    I'm 28 and just started teaching college kids. Sometimes I think they like younger teachers because they are easier to relate to. It helps that I make pop culture references and see a few of them at the bar (small town).

    I agree that learning how to teach should be valuable. I've never had one minute of instruction as far as that goes. I guess they figure that, after grad school, you've been taking classes long enough that you should know how to teach them. I want to make sure I'm doing the best job I can, so I wouldn't mind taking a class or two in teaching methods.

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