Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Xmas dinners

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17,427

    Talking Xmas dinners

    Time to jump the gun on Christmas dinners.

    This is a traditional Christmas dinner over here, just started with Christmas dinners this weekend. The season for those dinners is from now and until January, February.

    This dish is named “Pinnekjott” (literally “stick meat”). It is a traditional Christmas dish in the western parts of Norway. Pinnekjott is salted and dried and sometimes smoked lamb’s ribs which are steamed, usually, but not necessarily, over birch branches, and served with mashed swede, potato and gravy.
    Tough still mostly served in the western parts of the country (“Vestlandet”), pinnekjott is gaining popularity in other parts of Norway, too.
    It is unclear if the dish originally got its name “stick meat” from the birch sticks used in the steaming process, or because of the visual nature of the individual rib bones. However, it is common to call the individual ribs “pinner” (“sticks”), so that is perhaps the most obvious interpretation.

    And it is super gooooooooood – Any other traditional Christmas food from other countries????

  2. #2
    As a kid in Ireland, we always had Turkey, Ham, Stuffing, Roast Potatoes, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots and Gravy for our Christmas Dinner, followed by Christmas Pudding - and I hated the lot!!! One of the great things about becoming an adult and moving out of the family home was the freedom to eat what I wanted at Christmas! So that's just what I do - it gets changed around a bit from year to year but mostly I go for lots of different fish dishes.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17,427
    I know you are a fish woman (lol). Over here many also uses fresh cod or lobster for Christmas dinners - Me? I eat anything. Turkey is also common the last years.

  4. #4
    Well, for me it isn't Christmas unless there's Chestnut Stuffing!

    Although, I like the sound of fish over Christmas, it's not quite as heavy afterwards. If I was doing fish, I think Monkfish wrapped with Parma ham would go down nicely.

    Hmmm, I'm hungry now!

    Simon.

  5. #5
    Senior Member WM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Everywhere the circus goes
    Posts
    1,205
    just started with Christmas dinners this weekend. The season for those dinners is from now and until January, February.
    You get to have Christmas dinners that long? Wow! I'm movin' to Norway! In my family it's a one day thing and then your'e done unless you manage to grab onto some leftovers!

    Typical American Christmas stuff cooked by our family. Turkey, ham, stuffing, cranberry sauce, sweet potatoe pie, vegies, cakes, cookies, etc. I don't eat meat though, so my mother-in-law makes special stuffing just for me with no meat.

    "I just want you to know, it was the best time ever." J.F.F.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jukespin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Placerville, Calif., U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,707

    Wink Norway Christmas Diners & Cusine

    In "So I Married An Ax Murderer", Mike Meyers character says:

    " In fact, I think most Scottish cuisine is based on a dare."

    After reading what the pictured dish consists of, I'm wondering: is most Norwegian cusine based on a dare?

    With Christmas dining season spaning some three to four months, I've also got of wonder if each houshold keeps a supply of wheelchairs on hand to facilitate the mobility of the partakers of this extended indulgence?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17,427
    Quote Originally Posted by jukespin
    In "So I Married An Ax Murderer", Mike Meyers character says:

    " In fact, I think most Scottish cuisine is based on a dare."

    After reading what the pictured dish consists of, I'm wondering: is most Norwegian cusine based on a dare?

    With Christmas dining season spaning some three to four months, I've also got of wonder if each houshold keeps a supply of wheelchairs on hand to facilitate the mobility of the partakers of this extended indulgence?
    Ha ha. Dare… This dish or food has traditions hundreds of years back in time. And like many of those traditional cosines the clue was to preserve the food over time. To do that the food often was salted and prepared some time before it was consumed. Like this dish the ribs are dry salted and stored in salt as whole rib racks for a few weeks. After that period the ribs are taken out of the salt and then dried for another few weeks in-house in a room with air circulation and not to hot, preferably an unused basement or similar. The day before it will be consumed and steamed in a casserole it is put in water over night so that it will not be too salty. And the birch wood sticks we don’t eat LOL (not that dare) – they are just used (without the bark) as a layer in the bottom of the casserole so that the meat will not be in contact with the fluids that will collect here (the fluids will become the sauce/gravy). The birch wood sticks are these days replaced with some kind of a steel grate. When I lived in Canada we could not have this food, so I bought a couple of lambs from a butcher store and made it from scratch myself – it is very simple and very good. No wonder we have eaten it for hundreds of years. Some of our cod fish are also made like this – the stockfish (dried fish) – normally exported to the Mediterranean countries and used as Bacalao. The dining season actually starts these days, many companies takes there business relations to restaurants for this food and peoples at home starts now, but the serious eating don’t start for up until Christmas itself. And I agree, there were times before I got my wheelchair after those dinners I actually could have wanted a wheelchair… and not only me, you gets really full of this food, not because of the food itself but because of all the eating (and drinking I almost did forget) – You guys should try it sometime I guarantee that you would like it.

    Actually some makes sheep’s heads this way, that’s also a tradition, but to much dare food even for me. And the Scottish has their Haggis – even more dare food LOL
    Last edited by Leif; 11-08-2005 at 09:41 AM.

  8. #8
    Leif,

    The US is such a melting pot, many of our traditions are derived from where our ancestors originated. I live in Minnesota where many of us are of scandanavian descent. For example, my Great-Grandparents immigrated here from Norway on their honeymoon decades ago. After all these years, my family on my Dad's side still has lutefisk and lefse during the holiday season. Lutefisk--yucky. lefse--yummy.

    Susan

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    17,427
    Hi Susan. Norway is become a melting pot as well – most people just eat Pizza So your grand-grandparents are from Norway, very nice (hello to you from Norway). I know many immigrated to the US in that time period and especially to Minnesota, North Dakota and Pennsylvania – well for that matter all over the US. I have some relatives several places in North America due to this and also later immigration patterns.
    I kind of like Lutefisk if it is not to jelly like in consistence, but Lefse is a winner. I’m from close to a city named Haugesund – where did your relatives come from here in Norway?

  10. #10
    Senior Member jukespin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Placerville, Calif., U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,707

    Wink Lukefisk in the Movies

    Quote Originally Posted by Susan M
    Leif,

    The US is such a melting pot, many of our traditions are derived from where our ancestors originated. I live in Minnesota where many of us are of scandanavian descent. For example, my Great-Grandparents immigrated here from Norway on their honeymoon decades ago. After all these years, my family on my Dad's side still has lutefisk and lefse during the holiday season. Lutefisk--yucky. lefse--yummy.

    Susan
    From "Drop Dead Gorgeous", a 1999 film by Mike
    Jann and staring Kirstin Dunst, Ellen Barkin, Allison Janney, etc.; a tongue
    in cheek look at the philosophies of some small town beauty pageant
    contestants and their parents. If you like ofbeat, satyrical comedies, this
    film will please.

    The lutefisk comment is generated by an exchange between Dunst's character and that of the HS football captian, who's trying to hit on her for a date while she's working lunch-time clean up at the cafeteria. She's just had her main pageant competition, 'Becky' Ann Leeman, get food on her by dropping her dirty tray into the sink (she had her own hopes for filling the FB captain's free time). The guy's embarassed for her and say: "You've got
    lutefisk in your hair." She replies with ironiclly cheerful resolve: "Then it must be Wednesday."

    Cut to scene in library where the seventy-one* y/o librarian and 1945 beauty
    pageant winner (in an earlier scene we see her in '45' in a one piece
    bathing suit getting her 'crown'. She has waist length, honey blond hair, a voluptuous figure and is gorgeous) is stamping books: She looks up into camera -

    Iona Hildebrandt: "Lutefisk. It's cod, that's been soaked in lye for about a
    week."

    She looks back down and stamps another book, then looks back up into
    camera -

    Iona Hildebrandt: " It's best served with lots of butter."

    Above for your amusement (don't see how you're a bad Norvegian).

    * After doing the math, I had to come back and correct her age; she was seventeen in '45' to which fifty four years must be added (film was made in '99').
    Last edited by jukespin; 11-09-2005 at 01:33 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. toon..xmas, the 3 wise.....
    By reeseo in forum Life
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-27-2003, 08:52 PM
  2. Xmas misery after thug attacks man in wheelchair (sci)
    By Max in forum Ability & Disability News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-26-2002, 07:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •