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Thread: Hunting with .30-06

  1. #21
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Thanks.

    Here's the complete story...
    We spotted a group of hogs up on this hillside from about a half mile away. We used an ATV to close the distance to about 300 yards. We parked the machine and had to climb a hill, about 150 yards. We slowly came over the top of the hill and down the other side about 30 yards, being covered by some oak trees and snuck along the hill parallel to the ridge another 100 yards till we found an opening I could shoot through to the other side of the canyon where the hogs were.

    I looked around for a spot to set my rifle with the bipod, but there was nothing useful so I just sat on my butt and steadied myself using a three point shooting position. My guide was standing next to me with his rifle between a crotch in a tree helping me to pick out a juicy one. We waited about 10 minutes till the one I wanted stepped into my shooting lane. I lined up the crosshairs and squeezed the trigger. The shot hit the back of her heart, she jumped up and began squealing. The entire heard (about 15-20 hogs) scattered and ran away from us. She on the other hand came right for us! She had to go downhill 100 yards and uphill on our side another 100 or so yards. Both me and my guide had the hog in our scopes as she came right at us. He was yelling "shoot! shoot! shoot!" This was a meat hog so I didn't want to take a head on shot and risk tearing the guts up so I waited and kept her in my scope hoping she'd turn broadside. As she came at us her heart was pumping a steady stream of blood the size of your thumb out of both sides of her. There was an embankment she had to try to climb around 10 yards in front of us before she could get to us. As she chugged up and around this obstacle she presented me with the angle I'd been hoping for and I squeezed the second shot, hitting the front of her heart at 10 yards and changing her mind about eating me. She let out a groan as she was hit with this shot and continued up and over the hill heading toward our ATV. She was out of sight now so I turned to look at my guide only to find him in the tree with his rifle laying in the grass 5 feet from me with a round jammed in it. He climbed down and we fussed with his gun till the round was cleared, then we set out to find the hog. Apparently she'd expired just after she'd gone over the ridge. She plopped down and slid 140 yards to the bottom of the hill coming to rest 10 yards from our ATV. In the photo she's laying right where we found her.

    Here are the pics:

    Warning! One of these pics is very graphic so if you're squeamish do not view..





    Notice the left front shoulder in the first pic, there's no visible damage. In the second pic you can clearly see the fist sized hole in the shoulder caused from my 150 grn 7mm mag ballistic tip. The bullet completely disintegrated.
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  2. #22
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    Some really though animals those wild boars I understands. Running around with two harth shots? It can be handy to have the 150 grn 7mm mag round up against anything that wants to bite and eat you.Good story.

  3. #23
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Ya those boar are very tough. I'd heard many wild stories about them before I went on that trip, but never really considered any of them to be more than tall tales. After my experience I was all the more horrified that those stories were true.

    Believe it or not, there are some kooks down in Texas that hunt boar with dogs and either use a spear or a large knife! The dogs corner the hog and keep it busy while the guy jumps in there trying to grab it's hind legs to pin it on the ground and cut it's throat. When I first heard about that I couldn't believe it. That's not for me,...no thanks.

    I didn't really want to use that bullet (ballistic tip) for that trip, but I didn't have enough time to develope a load using a more suitable bullet so I went with what I knew would shoot where I was aiming. I can put 5 rounds in a group the size of my pinky fingernail with that ballistic tip load. After that trip I worked up a load using the Barnes X bullet. This round worked very well on a couple Elk. The Barnes penetrated nicely on a quartering away shot and exited in front of the offside shoulder. The Elk went about 100 yards before expiring. The second Elk was hit in the neck which is where I usually try to place my shots and the beast dropped like it was hit by lightning. It was dead before it hit the ground. Again, the round penetrated completely and exited the opposite side.

    Prior to using the Barnes X I was using the Trophy Bonded Bear Claw, but it wouldn't shoot out of my gun worth a dam. I tried several differen load combinations but couldn't get better than a 1 1/2" group @ 100 yards. To me this is unacceptable. The Barnes works exceptionally well out of my gun so it's my go to choice ever since.
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  4. #24
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    Some Scandinavians uses to go to Poland for hunting those boars; I’ve seen videos of it. Those ppl down in Texas using dogs and manual weapons must be something special huh. I would not do it, they have long toots with powerful jaws and they can be furious.

    I have newer made ammo myself, but normally use bullets made from “Norma” and other ppl who makes ammo. I was planning one time to go into it, but don’t hunt that much so I buy it from the hunting stores as well. And neck shoots are good if seen from the side, we SCI ppl should now that. I also like to be accurate when hunting, I (before SCI) did spend a lot of time at the shooting range to be able to do that. And the first shot is the most important not necessary the group, it can depend on barrel heating etc. but you surely know this. Good thread and good stories here, it’s interesting to read about your chose of rounds. Thanks. I’ll se if I can dig up some photos from Newfoundland and post here. Have you done any handgun hunting?

    I just did see another thread of you. Glad to see you manages to go out in the woods in some way. Good luck.
    Last edited by Leif; 10-22-2005 at 01:07 PM.

  5. #25
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Yes Leif I've taken my .41 magnum on a few trips, but never used it. I bought it for the specific purpose of using it as a back up weapon for Boar hunting with my compound bow. I toted it around on an Elk trip once also. Only once though, Elk hunting is done in very brutal altitudes and terrain. You don't want to carry an ounce of extra weight you don't have to and that damn thing is pretty heavy (6" barrel, fully loaded, electronic sight). Since my injury it's been relegated to use on two legged critters and rests near my bed in a quick opening combination handgun safe. It's not legal to use in the state I live in for hunting purposes so it won't go with me and isn't really needed anyway.

    There's quite a bit of difference between store bought ammo and handloaded ammo made by you. For starters, ideally you want your bullet to be between two and five thousandths of an inch from the lands (rifling) when the bolt is closed for optimal accuracy. This is an extremely close tolerance. Store bought ammo placed next to my handmade ammo is 1/4" shorter than the ones I make. So the store bought ammo is essentially 1/4" away from the rifling which is a very long distance when speaking in terms of accuracy potential.

    Next you have various gun powder manufacturers and each makes various powders that burn at different rates. You can buy two identical rifles at the store, same manufacturer, caliber, action, the whole shmear and they'll each shoot very differently. That is to say one might shoot high and right while the other will shoot low and left with the exact same ammo. This has absolutely nothing to do with the shooter. The gun could be placed in a steel clamp eliminating all human error and you'd get these results. The reason for this is because the barrels are unique as is the way they rest in the stock itself. There are many nuances to consider and discover before you'll have a real tack driver.

    Personally I prefer a full length bedded action and barrel while some like the barrel "free floated." Sometimes a preference won't mean squat as the gun will dictate to you what "it" likes.

    When I'm really hauling ass making my ammo I can make about 10 rounds an hour. This is working with brass that's already been cleaned and primed. You can see it's not a fast process and shouldn't be. Each round has the exact weight in powder, right down the granual. The bullets are seated with a micrometer to the thousandth of an inch, checked and rechecked. It's not possible to get this kind of precision from a store bought box of ammo and even if you could it still doesn't mean they'd have the type, amount and burn rate of powder your gun likes for that weight bullet.

    This brings me to yet another thought.......if you decide you want to shoot a heavier or lighter bullet you have to start all over with your powder selection, and amount till you find what works best for that combination.

    It's a labor of love or in my case a compulsive neurosis...
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  6. #26
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    Nice boar Stylin Moe. The only time I've been around wild boars was at a friends farm. They were fenced in but they were still very wild.

    We would dare each other to run across the fenced in area. After a few beer we thought we could make it across, very poor judgement on our part. We would jump in and as soon as they saw us they would run at us screaming, actually I'm not sure if it was them or us screaming. We wouldn't get 5 feet and we would have to turn around and jump the fence.

    It would be a huge rush to hunt them but I'd have to be up a tree. I'm not much of a runner anymore. They sure were tasty when we BBQ'd some of those buggers up.

  7. #27
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Yes the hogs can be quite nasty. I'll do another hog hunt soon. I don't mind being on the ground. I usually try to take a neck shot which drops them instantly. I didn't on this one because she had her neck turned as she was looking back at something. If I'd have shot her in the neck in that position the bullet would have had to go through her head first. I didn't think the bullet would hold up to be able to penetrate through it's head and into and through the neck with enough force to damage the spinal cord for a quick kill. As it turns out I was right. The second pic illustrates this pretty well. The second shot struck a rib and opened very rapidly, then struck the off shoulder and literally blew up.

    This hog was very tasty...
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  8. #28
    Nice hog, Moe. Never had the chance to do a boar hunt. Will be in the woods in 10 days!! Not that I'm counting or anything.

  9. #29
    Senior Member stlyin moe's Avatar
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    Thanks graybeard.

    I've been out a couple times now, but nothing yet.

    I got close to getting a good load combination for my muzzleloader, but the one and only public range in this state closed for the season before I could get it fine tuned. I'm now forced to join a gun club so I can have access to a range. The muzzleloader season starts Oct 31 here. I have an appn at a gun club Nov 2 to see if they'll let me join. If so I can get that load fine tuned in a day (hopefully that'll Nov 3).

    That hog hunt was pretty economical. $350.00 plus another $50.00 to have it butchered and wrapped. I believe the guide called himself "mustang guide service" in King City. He was a very nice guy. He brought along another guy, Keck, also a very nice guy. They were a lot of fun. Good people. If you get the chance you'll have a great time.

    I hope to post a pic of a nice buck before this season is out...
    "Timid men prefer the calm of despotism to the tempestuous sea of liberty." ~ Thomas Jefferson

  10. #30
    I finally got in the woods Wednesday. Shoulda stayed home. It was 75 degrees, hot as could be. I was pleased to be able to handle my muzzleloader without a whole lot of movement. However, my body did tire quickly when having to stay on target for awhile. It was sweet jus to hang out in the woods for the day. I plan on going again next Wednesday,hoping the deer will be more accomodating this time.

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