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Thread: Rog, et al. (2005). Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.

  1. #1

    Rog, et al. (2005). Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.

    This is statistically very significant.
    [*] Rog DJ, Nurmikko TJ, Friede T and Young CA (2005). Randomized, controlled trial of cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis. Neurology 65: 812-9. BACKGROUND: Central pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common and often refractory to treatment. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, 5-week (1-week run-in, 4-week treatment), randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial in 66 patients with MS and central pain states (59 dysesthetic, seven painful spasms) of a whole-plant cannabis-based medicine (CBM), containing delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol:cannabidiol (THC:CBD) delivered via an oromucosal spray, as adjunctive analgesic treatment. Each spray delivered 2.7 mg of THC and 2.5 of CBD, and patients could gradually self-titrate to a maximum of 48 sprays in 24 hours. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients (97%) completed the trial, 34 received CBM. In week 4, the mean number of daily sprays taken of CBM (n = 32) was 9.6 (range 2 to 25, SD = 6.0) and of placebo (n = 31) was 19.1 (range 1 to 47, SD = 12.9). Pain and sleep disturbance were recorded daily on an 11-point numerical rating scale. CBM was superior to placebo in reducing the mean intensity of pain (CBM mean change -2.7, 95% CI: -3.4 to -2.0, placebo -1.4 95% CI: -2.0 to -0.8, comparison between groups, p = 0.005) and sleep disturbance (CBM mean change -2.5, 95% CI: -3.4 to -1.7, placebo -0.8, 95% CI: -1.5 to -0.1, comparison between groups, p = 0.003). CBM was generally well tolerated, although more patients on CBM than placebo reported dizziness, dry mouth, and somnolence. Cognitive side effects were limited to long-term memory storage. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis-based medicine is effective in reducing pain and sleep disturbance in patients with multiple sclerosis related central neuropathic pain and is mostly well tolerated. Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. djrdjr@doctors.org.uk http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16186518

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Thanks for posting this, Dr Young.

    I have been using Sativex for almost 3 weeks now for Central Pain from Syringomyelia. My sleep is much improved, although I have vividly entertaining dreams. My bladder spasms are also reduced and my gi tract functions better. The biggest improvement is in the burning/freezing allodynia. There are plenty of stupifying effects that I don't enjoy much and I can't say it produces euphoria (although I wouldn't complain). One very strange effect is that I find myself using my non-dominant hand to complete tasks. For example, I find myself brushing my teeth using my right hand, I am aware it feels clumsy. Odd that something I have done several times a day for 45 years is no longer automatic.

    I hope this medication is approved for use in other countries besides Canada, although it is not a panacea, any relief is welcome for hard-to-treat CP.
    Last edited by cameron887; 10-02-2005 at 04:29 PM.

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