Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Sexual recovery ?

  1. #1

    Question Sexual recovery ?

    September 08, 2005
    Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems, Inc.

    About the BrainGate(TM) System
    The BrainGate Neural Interface System is a proprietary brain-computer interface (BCI), an investigational device currently in clinical trials, that consists of an internal sensor to detect brain cell activity and external processors that convert these brain signals into a computer-mediated output under the person's own control. The sensor is a tiny silicon chip about the size of a baby aspirin with one hundred electrodes, each thinner than a human hair, that can detect the electrical activity of neurons. The sensor is implanted on the surface of the area of the brain responsible for movement, the motor cortex. A small wire connects the sensor to a pedestal that is placed on the skull, extending through the scalp. An external cable connects the pedestal to a cart containing computers, signal processors and monitors that enable the study operators to determine how well study participants can control devices driven by their neural output - that is, by thought alone. The ultimate goal of the BrainGate System development program is to create a safe, effective and unobtrusive universal operating system that will enable those with motor impairments resulting from a variety of causes to quickly and reliably control a wide range of devices, including computers, assistive technologies and medical devices, simply by using their thoughts. (…)
    Dear Dr Young, the subject of your post (above) speaks about motor control ; but one day, will Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology "restore" sensitive and sexual ability to have orgasm ?

    I posted the 12-20-2004 a same question to you, in regard to the sexual problem for SCI people :

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    ...Note that an orgasm can probably be produced by electrical stimulation of certain centers in the brain or spinal cord.
    12-20-2004
    Dear Dr Young,
    Is there already a system of electrical stimulation available tested on SCI's patients or others which has produced (real) orgasms in their body ? It may be interesting for us...

    Thank you for reply...
    Thierry Delrieu
    ... and you answered :

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    Thierry, it has been done in animals. I don't think that it has been tried in humans yet but I will try to find out. Wise.
    Since last time, may you tell me if you know more about this technology ? Because I doubt that the cells therapies (OEGs, Stem cells, even with combo…) will allow us to get enough sexual recovery for to be able to have a real orgasm again (= discharge in the brain of endorphin, prolactin…). As sexual spinal program is located at sacral spinal level S4, it may be difficult to restore such low axonals connections, am I wrong ?

    w.r.t drugs to give orgasm sensation, I sent a mail to Pr Gert Holstege (Univ. of Groningen, Netherlands), who is working in the field of sexual behavior and neurophysiology (see : scientific reports below) :

    09/27/04 10:23, g. holstege g.holstege@med.rug.nl wrote :
    Dear Thierry,
    Thank you for your e-mail. The problem is the following. Ejaculation and orgasm are two different programs in the central nervous system.
    Orgasm is the reward for sexual acts, as sex is crucial for animals and humans to produce offspring. A similar reward can be obtained when one uses drugs, as heroin. That is also the reason why heroin is so addictive, one gets the reward all the time when one takes the drug.
    With regard to sex, the reward center is made active by ascending pathways from the sacral spinal cord to the brain. When these pathways are interrupted, because of spinal cord injury, the reward center cannot be "excited" and thus is orgasm not possible by doing sex. Thus, a drug that produces a similar feeling of orgasm already exists, (heroin and to a lesser extent cocaine), but I think that in future there will be others too.
    However, the connection sex and reward will always be a problem in spinal cord injured humans, because the message from the lower spinal cord to the reward center is interrupted, at least in those patients in which the transsection of the spinal cord is total. A solution in the future might be to take drugs during sexual activity, but the addiction problem will always be there.
    I hope that you understand what I try to communicate, and hope that these remarks are to some help to you,
    Sincerely,
    Gert Holstege

    Gert Holstege, M.D., Ph.D.
    Univ. of Groningen
    Professor and Chairman
    Dept. Anatomy and Embryology
    Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
    A. Deusinglaan 1
    9713 AV Groningen - Netherlands
    Work Phone: 31503632460
    Fax: 31503632461
    E-mail Address: g.holstege@med.rug.nl
    Dr Young, I know that a colleague at Rutgers University (New Jersey), Helen Fisher, anthropologist, is working in this field… So, may you tell me more about it ?

    And dear Corinne, as you live in the Netherlands, may you contact Professor Holstege for to get more updated data about his research, please ?

    Thank you very much for reply…

    Best regards,

    Thierry
    www.asso-alarme.com/forum
    Last edited by tdelrieu; 09-10-2005 at 11:34 AM.

  2. #2
    Here's the 2 scientific reports :

    BRAIN ACTIVATION DURING FEMALE SEXUAL ORGASM.

    G.Holstege1*; A.A.T.Reinders2; A.M.J.Paans3; L.C.Meiners4; J.Pruim3; J.R.Georgiadis1

    1. Dept. Anat. & Embryology, 2. Dept. Biological Psychiatry, Univ. of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
    3. PET-Ctr., 4. Dept. Radiology, Groningen Univ. Hosp., Groningen, Netherlands


    It is obvious that experiencing an orgasm is a brain function, but very little is known about which brain regions are involved.
    Positron Emission Tomography was used to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 8 healthy heterosexual right handed female subjects during rest (no sexual arousal), imitating or faking an orgasm, clitoral stimulation, and orgasm. Clitoral stimulation, performed manually by the subjects? male partner, was used during all conditions except rest. During faking of orgasm the subjects voluntarily performed the motor output of an orgasm, which was one of the controls that the orgasm was real. Other controls were measurements of anal pressure, pelvic floor-EMG, heart rate, and blood pressure. Within each subject physiological recordings for faking orgasm and real orgasm were clearly different.
    Compared to clitoral stimulation, increased rCBF during orgasm was found in the meso-diencephalic junction, periaqueductal gray (PAG), lateral putamen, ventral pallidum, and in all parts of the cerebellum. Conversely, during faking of orgasm increased rCBF was found in pelvic floor motor cortex, right motor cortex, and medial parts of the cerebellum, pointing to voluntary motor system involvement.
    These results demonstrate that, similar to ejaculation and orgasm in men (Holstege et al. 2003), during female orgasm activation occurs primarily in subcortical parts of the brain. The meso-diencephalic junction comprises the reward-related ventral tegmental area, which might produce the pleasure aspect of orgasm. The finding of involvement of the PAG is interesting, because this area has been shown to play a role in female cat, rat, and hamster sexual behavior. Faking an orgasm only activated parts of the voluntary motor system.

    G. Holstege, A.A.T. Reinders, A.M.J. Paans, L.C. Meiners, J. Pruim, J.R. Georgiadis. BRAIN ACTIVATION DURING FEMALE SEXUAL ORGASM. Program No. 727.7. 2003 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner. Washington, DC: Society for Neuroscience, 2003.
    J. Neurosci.
    August 12, 2003.
    Brain Activation during Human Male Ejaculation

    Gert Holstege,1 Janniko R. Georgiadis,1 Anne M. J. Paans,2 Linda C. Meiners,3 Ferdinand H. C. E. van der Graaf,4 and A. A. T. Simone Reinders5

    1Department of Anatomy and Embryology, University of Groningen, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands, and 2Positron Emission Tomography Centre and Departments of 3Radiology, 4Neurology, and 5Biological Psychiatry, University Hospital Groningen, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands


    Brain mechanisms that control human sexual behavior in general, and ejaculation in particular, are poorly understood. We used positron emission tomography to measure increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during ejaculation compared with sexual stimulation in heterosexual male volunteers. Manual penile stimulation was performed by the volunteer's female partner. Primary activation was found in the mesodiencephalic transition zone, including the ventral tegmental area, which is involved in a wide variety of rewarding behaviors. Parallels are drawn between ejaculation and heroin rush. Other activated mesodiencephalic structures are the midbrain lateral central tegmental field, zona incerta, subparafascicular nucleus, and the ventroposterior, midline, and intralaminar thalamic nuclei. Increased activation was also present in the lateral putamen and adjoining parts of the claustrum.

    Neocortical activity was only found in Brodmann areas 7/40, 18, 21, 23, and 47, exclusively on the right side. On the basis of studies in rodents, the medial preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and amygdala are thought to be involved in ejaculation, but increased rCBF was not found in any of these regions. Conversely, in the amygdala and adjacent entorhinal cortex, a decrease in activation was observed.

    Remarkably strong rCBF increases were observed in the cerebellum. These findings corroborate the recent notion that the cerebellum plays an important role in emotional processing. The present study for the first time provides insight into which regions in the human brain play a primary role in ejaculation, and the results might have important implications for our understanding of how human ejaculation is brought about, and for our ability to improve sexual function and satisfaction in men.

  3. #3
    Thierry,

    The presence of "pleasure centers" in the brain has long been known. It is possible to insert electrodes into those parts of the brain and activate pleasurable feelings that may contribute to orgasms. There are pharmaceutical means of activating such brain activity as well. I remember a prominent clinician once commenting to me in 1996 while we are watching Christopher Reeve talk, that the cure should be an electrode in the brain. I heard this with mixed feelings, shocked that somebody could think that an electrode that could activate orgasms in the brain would be an adequate replacement for sex.

    Spinal cord injury deprives people of the part of their bodies below the injury site. One can try to reconnect and restore function or substitute prosthetics for that function. Thus, for example, many people here on this forum are using voice-activated software or other devices to read and post. Unless somebody told me that he or she is spinal-injured, I would not be able to tell. Is that person cured? I don't think so. Is the software important and good. Yes, I think so.

    Along the same vein, there are now devices that allow people to stimulate muscles through computer interfaces and achieving function. The function is still relatively crude but will no doubt improve in the coming years. Currently, these methods currently all lack sensory feedback to the brain. The next step will be the rerouting of sensory information from prosthetic devices to the brain. Is this a cure? Some might think so. I am not so sure.

    I am very much in favor of better devices that improve the quality of life for people with spinal cord and brain injuries. I favor them in the same way that I favor computers and believe that we should have better and faster hardware and software that allow people to do things that they could not have done. In many ways, I have become so dependent on computers that i don't think that I can be away from one more than couple hours before feeling pangs.

    Wise.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    The presence of "pleasure centers" in the brain has long been known. It is possible to insert electrodes into those parts of the brain and activate pleasurable feelings that may contribute to orgasms. There are pharmaceutical means of activating such brain activity as well...
    Dr Young,

    So, may you tell to me the name of the drug to have an orgasm, and the laboratory which worked on ?

    Thank you...

    Thierry

  5. #5
    Thierry,

    There are some who believe that a cocaine high has orgasmic parallels (http://cocaine.org/hardstuf.html) and there are no dearth of claimed aphrodesiacs. Interesting, even amongst the most hardened advocates of drug use, most shrink away from the thought of chemically induced orgasms.

    Wise.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    ...Interesting, even amongst the most hardened advocates of drug use, most shrink away from the thought of chemically induced orgasms.

    Wise.
    OK... Pr Holstege said that a drug that produces a similar feeling of orgasm already exists, (heroin and to a lesser extent cocaine), but he think that in future there will be others too. And a solution for SCI people might be to take drugs during sexual activity... but the addiction problem will always be there.

    So, I hope others drugs (pharmaceutical) with no addiction effect (or less than heroin, cocaine...), will be found and will be sold in drugstore for us... with medical control !!!

    Best regards,

    Thierry
    Last edited by tdelrieu; 09-11-2005 at 07:21 AM.

  7. #7

    Pr Holstege - NL

    Quote Originally Posted by tdelrieu
    And dear Corinne, as you live in the Netherlands, may you contact Professor Holstege for to get more updated data about his research, please ?

    Thank you very much for reply…

    Best regards,

    Thierry
    www.asso-alarme.com/forum
    dear Thierry, Yes, I will check with Pr Holstege if they have found out anything new !
    And I am also trying to get an update from dr Pachyrita, who also intended to start up a program to investigate/try sensory substitution applied to improve the quality of sexual relation of SCI patients. That was information I found 1 year ago, at least, but I do not know if the program was continued or not.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by tdelrieu
    OK... Pr Holstege said that a drug that produces a similar feeling of orgasm already exists, (heroin and to a lesser extent cocaine), but he think that in future there will be others too. And a solution for SCI people might be to take drugs during sexual activity... but the addiction problem will always be there.

    So, I hope others drugs (pharmaceutical) with no addiction effect (or less than heroin, cocaine...), will be found and will be sold in drugstore for us... with medical control !!!

    Best regards,

    Thierry
    Hmm....reading this thread reminds me of an article I read some years back about a drug called anafranil, I think. If I remember correctly, it was used in Europe, but not the US and had the wonderful side effect of causing orgasm whenever the user yawned.

    -Chuck-
    ~Gentleness in speech and action goes a long way
    toward convincing me that someone has assimilated the lessons of life~

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Casteneda
    Hmm....reading this thread reminds me of an article I read some years back about a drug called anafranil, I think. If I remember correctly, it was used in Europe, but not the US and had the wonderful side effect of causing orgasm whenever the user yawned.

    -Chuck-
    Chuck,

    Anafranil is just an antidepressant, such as Tofranil and Elavil, used to treat people who suffer from obsessions and compulsions.

    For more data about it :
    http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/r.../ana1020.shtml

    Regards,

    Thierry
    www.asso-alarme.com/forum

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Corinne Jeanmaire
    dear Thierry, Yes, I will check with Pr Holstege if they have found out anything new !
    And I am also trying to get an update from dr Pachyrita, who also intended to start up a program to investigate/try sensory substitution applied to improve the quality of sexual relation of SCI patients. That was information I found 1 year ago, at least, but I do not know if the program was continued or not.
    Dear Corinne,

    Thank you VERY much... I love you, you are an

    Best regards,

    Thierry

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 08-21-2003, 07:58 PM
  2. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-11-2003, 01:23 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •