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Thread: Sodium Nitrate Could Be Disease Cure

  1. #1

    Sodium Nitrate Could Be Disease Cure

    I searched under sodium nitrate but nothing came up so I assume this hasn't been posted.

    By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
    Mon Sep 5, 4:19 PM ET

    WASHINGTON - Could the salt that preserves hot dogs also preserve your health? Scientists at the National Institutes of Health think so. They've begun infusing sodium nitrite into volunteers in hopes that it could prove a cheap but potent treatment for sickle cell anemia, heart attacks, brain aneurysms, even an illness that suffocates babies.

    Those ailments have something in common: They hinge on problems with low oxygen, problems the government's research suggests nitrite can ease.

    Beyond repairing the reputation of this often maligned meat preservative, the work promises to rewrite scientific dogma about how blood flows, and how the body tries to protect itself when that flow is blocked. Indeed, nitrite seems to guard tissues — in the heart, the lungs, the brain — against cellular death when they become starved of oxygen.

    source

    Dr. Young, could this be used to stave off the cell death that occurs after an SCI?

  2. #2
    Seneca, there is sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrate is used to preserve bacon but bacteria converts the sodium nitrate to sodium nitrite which preserves meat by killing bacteria. Sodium nitrate is an explosive at about 1000 degrees F. I try to avoid sodium nitrate or nitrite because both are converted to nitrosamines which have been implicated to cause gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer, the two most deadly cancers known. Both of these are endemic in China where sodium nitrate is often used to pickle food. If possible, I prefer things that are preserved in pepper and garlic (like Korean kimchee).

    http://www.supermarketguru.com/page.cfm/14224

    Wise.

    Quote Originally Posted by seneca
    I searched under sodium nitrate but nothing came up so I assume this hasn't been posted.

    By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
    Mon Sep 5, 4:19 PM ET

    WASHINGTON - Could the salt that preserves hot dogs also preserve your health? Scientists at the National Institutes of Health think so. They've begun infusing sodium nitrite into volunteers in hopes that it could prove a cheap but potent treatment for sickle cell anemia, heart attacks, brain aneurysms, even an illness that suffocates babies.

    Those ailments have something in common: They hinge on problems with low oxygen, problems the government's research suggests nitrite can ease.

    Beyond repairing the reputation of this often maligned meat preservative, the work promises to rewrite scientific dogma about how blood flows, and how the body tries to protect itself when that flow is blocked. Indeed, nitrite seems to guard tissues — in the heart, the lungs, the brain — against cellular death when they become starved of oxygen.

    source

    Dr. Young, could this be used to stave off the cell death that occurs after an SCI?

  3. #3
    Right Dr. Young, the article states that it's a much maligned food preservative but what about it's potential to protect tissue from death caused by oxygen deprivation?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by seneca
    Right Dr. Young, the article states that it's a much maligned food preservative but what about it's potential to protect tissue from death caused by oxygen deprivation?
    I just did a search for sodium nitrate and ischemia. Almost all the papers had to do with nitroglycerin that produced nitric oxide, commonly used for cardiac ischemia because it causes vasodilation. This therapy is sometimes called "nitrate therapy". Other than this, I was not able to find anything more.

  5. #5

    Post The promise of new medical uses for sodium nitrite for heart attack and organ damage

    Quote Originally Posted by seneca
    I searched under sodium nitrate but nothing came up so I assume this hasn't been posted.

    By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer
    Mon Sep 5, 4:19 PM ET

    WASHINGTON - Could the salt that preserves hot dogs also preserve your health? Scientists at the National Institutes of Health think so. They've begun infusing sodium nitrite into volunteers in hopes that it could prove a cheap but potent treatment for sickle cell anemia, heart attacks, brain aneurysms, even an illness that suffocates babies.

    Those ailments have something in common: They hinge on problems with low oxygen, problems the government's research suggests nitrite can ease.

    Beyond repairing the reputation of this often maligned meat preservative, the work promises to rewrite scientific dogma about how blood flows, and how the body tries to protect itself when that flow is blocked. Indeed, nitrite seems to guard tissues — in the heart, the lungs, the brain — against cellular death when they become starved of oxygen.

    source

    Dr. Young, could this be used to stave off the cell death that occurs after an SCI?

    All that attributes to the ability of sodium nitrites and nitrate to release the vasodilator gas NO (EDRF) which causes dilation of blood vessels in the CVS by inducing guanaylate cyclase and increasing cGMP levels.

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medi...p?newsid=22861

    15 Apr 2005

    Sodium nitrite, a naturally occurring chemical and common meat preservative, is only used medically to treat cyanide poisoning. But if the results of a new animal study hold up under further research in people, the chemical may one day be used to protect and preserve tissue and organ function after heart attack, high risk abdominal surgery, and organ transplantation.

    The new study was conducted by scientists with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in collaboration with investigators supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and published in the May issue* of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

    The scientists found that low concentrations of sodium nitrite had a strong protective effect - preventing cell death in the hearts and livers of mice undergoing experimental heart attack and liver injury. In the heart study, nitrite reduced the size of the area of dead tissue known as an infarct by 67 percent compared to control animals given nitrate, another nitrogen compound. This potent protective effect was observed at concentrations of nitrite in blood that were only slightly higher than the physiological normal levels in blood.

    The study, led by David Lefer, Ph.D., of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport and Mark Gladwin, M.D., Head of the Vascular Therapeutics Section of the NHLBI's Cardiovascular Branch, follows another study conducted by the NIH research team that found that infusions of sodium nitrite into the human circulation leads to the production of nitric oxide (NO), a strong blood vessel dilating molecule that increases blood flow. The conversion of nitrite to NO will occur only in tissue or blood that is very low in oxygen. It was this finding that triggered the team's interest in sodium nitrite as a treatment/preventive for the tissue damage and cell death that can occur in conjunction with organ transplantation, heart attack, and treatment of a heart attack.

    In both the liver and heart components of the current study, the research team compared the effects of both lower and higher concentrations of nitrite versus control treatments of saline or nitrate, a chemical compound that is related to nitrite but cannot convert to NO in the blood. Surprisingly, they found that only low concentrations of nitrite provided protection against injury.

    The investigators are currently studying the mechanism for the protective effect of sodium nitrite and they believe it is related in some way to the conversion of nitrite to nitric oxide.

    "The remarkable thing about nitrite is that it is only converted to nitric oxide in the organs and tissues with the lowest oxygen levels, allowing for targeted NO delivery - and thus improved blood flow -- to tissues under stress. More research is needed to look at the effectiveness of nitrite in various organs and disease states in humans," said NHLBI's Gladwin who is also an investigator in the Critical Care Medicine Department, NIH Clinical Center.

    Gladwin is currently studying the use of sodium nitrite as a way to help adults with sickle cell disease. It is hoped that this treatment will reverse the effect of decreased blood flow due to the patients' "sickled" blood cells. Patients with sickle cell disease have abnormal hemoglobin molecules in their red blood cells. The molecules damage the red cells, causing them to change into a crescent or sickle shape and stick to blood vessel walls. This can lead to narrowed, or blocked, blood vessels leading to pain, damage, and anemia.

    Further studies either underway or in planning translate the new findings to humans. These studies evaluate sodium nitrite's effect on heart attacks, kidney failure, solid organ transplantation, cerebral vasospasm (a complication of a ruptured aneurysm leading to reduced blood flow and possible stroke), and high blood pressure in the lungs in babies.

    To arrange an interview with Dr. Gladwin, contact the NHLBI Communications Office at 301-496-4236. To interview Dr. Lefer, contact the LSU Office of Information Services at 318-675-5408.

    NHLBI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Federal Government's primary agency for biomedical and behavioral research. NIH is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NHLBI press releases and fact sheets, including a fact sheet on sickle cell anemia, can be found online at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov

    *"Cytoprotective Effects of Nitrite During In Vivo Ischemia-Reperfusion of the Heart and Liver" appears online on the Journal of Clinical Investigation Web Site - in advance of the print publication of the May issue.

    Contact: NHLBI Communications Office
    nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov
    301-496-4236
    NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
    http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov

  6. #6

    Post Oxidative damage of NO to SCI

    After a spinal cord injury, the body's inflammatory cells, among others, produce highly reactive oxidizing agents including "free radicals." Oxidizing agents attack molecules that are crucial for cell function by modifying their chemical structures. This process is called oxidative damage. Oxidative damage occurs in disorders ranging from slow neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) and Parkinson's disease to acute events like stroke and trauma. Thus, it has been the focus of intensive research. Scientists are learning which chemicals are responsible for oxidative damage in the nervous system, how they are generated, and what role the natural antioxidant defense systems play.

    Free radicals are produced as a byproduct of normal metabolism. The brain and spinal cord normally have a high rate of oxidative (energy-producing) metabolism. The increases in blood flow during "reperfusion," when blood flow is restored following injury, may raise free radical production even more. Inflammation can also accelerate the production of free radicals. Many scientists believe that superoxides (oxygen molecules with an extra electron) can escape from the normal antioxidant defenses of the CNS and combine with hydrogen peroxide, also normally present, to form hydroxyl radicals (oxygen-hydrogen with an extra electron). In the test tube, hydroxyl radicals are extremely reactive and quickly attack crucial cellular structures and enzymes. However, evidence suggests that this scenario may be different in the living CNS. For one thing, the CNS has concentrations of enzymes that can safely inactivate free radicals. The antioxidant enzyme called copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD), for example, is abundant in the CNS.

    Although hydroxyl radicals are the most reactive molecules in the test tube, nitric oxide may be a more important cause of oxidative damage in living animals. Nitric oxide itself is not very destructive -- in fact the body uses it as a signaling molecule -- but it can combine with superoxide ions to produce a very toxic compound called peroxynitrite. Nitric oxide forms peroxynitrite by a reaction that is a million times faster than the one that forms hydroxyl radicals, and it diffuses ten thousand times farther. Peroxynitrite increases its range of damage even more by inactivating some antioxidant defenses, such as SOD. This free radical also can change how cells respond to natural growth and survival factors; for example, it can change the effect of NGF (nerve growth factor) from protecting against apoptosis to accelerating this type of cell death.

    The complex actions of nitric oxide illustrate how the interactions between oxidants and biological systems influence how toxic the oxidants' effects can be. These results focus attention on harmful chemical agents that elude antioxidant defenses and attack critical cell molecules. One useful finding is that nitric oxide damage leaves a characteristic molecular "footprint" on cell proteins. This footprint may allow researchers to identify targets of oxidative damage following spinal cord trauma and help in developing therapeutic and protective measures

  7. #7
    DrNader, please provide a source for the information that you cited. Wise.

  8. #8

    Smile The source is in another thread too: SCI, emerging concepts

    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Young
    DrNader, please provide a source for the information that you cited. Wise.
    http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_ev..._report_pr.htm
    Thanks Dr. Wise

    PS/ I don't feel that you're yourself these past few days, what are you busy with?

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