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Thread: Electrical exercise system gives paralysis sufferers power to recover strength

  1. #1
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Cool Electrical exercise system gives paralysis sufferers power to recover strength

    Electrical exercise system gives paralysis sufferers power to recover strength

    EPSRC press release

    People affected by paralysis could enjoy more independence, better health and a higher quality of life thanks to an innovative system designed to improve fitness and increase arm strength.



    It uses electrical signals to stimulate movement in arm muscles where function has been lost, making it possible to work an arm-exercise machine (similar to an exercise bike but worked by the arms).

    This enables people with paralysis to enjoy the health benefits of regular work-outs. For those with some function in their arms, it also helps them become strong enough to perform more activities unaided (wheelchair propulsion, moving from wheelchair to bed/bath, washing and eating etc). Aimed at people with injuries to the spinal cord, the system may be able to help those with paralysis caused by strokes or head injuries too.

    This breakthrough is the result of a collaborative project undertaken by University of Glasgow engineers and Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). A company is now commercialising the research with a view to a product launch in the coming months. The project team is also producing a video with EPSRC support to raise awareness of its work among people with paralysis and the healthcare community.

    Using electrodes placed on the skin, small pulses of electricity are delivered to the nerves serving the biceps and triceps, replacing signals from the brain that can no longer reach the nerves. Controlled from a computer, the signals' timing and strength can be adjusted to suit individual needs, eg when signs of muscle fatigue become apparent. The arm-exercise machine is linked into the computer system, enabling the effort needed to turn the machine to be adjusted. Tetraplegic Sean Roake was one of the volunteers who worked with the project team during the research. His training programme, which consisted of three 20-30 minute sessions per week for several months, resulted in a 450% increase in muscle strength and a 50% increase in cardiopulmonary fitness. He says: "Everyday activities such as wheelchair-to-car transfers are so much easier now. I feel extremely positive knowing that I've taken responsibility for improving my health by exercising regularly using this system".


    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-epr080205.php

  2. #2
    Senior Member Max's Avatar
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    Cool Electrical Exercise System Gives Paralysis Sufferers Power To Recover Strength

    Electrical Exercise System Gives Paralysis Sufferers Power To Recover Strength

    People affected by paralysis could enjoy more independence, better health and a higher quality of life thanks to an innovative system designed to improve fitness and increase arm strength.


    An exercise in fitness -- Sean Roake demonstrates the new exercise system. (Image courtesy of Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council)
    Electrical Exercise System Gives Paralysis Sufferers Power To Recover Strength (August 5, 2005) -- A new system uses electrical signals to stimulate movement in arm muscles where function has been ... > full story

    Motivating Muscles: New UD Study Might Help People With Paralysis 'Stay Strong Longer' (April 6, 1998) -- People who have suffered paralyzing injuries sometimes can regain limited control of their muscles, thanks to electrical stimulation techniques now under development, but pulse patterns should be ... > full story

    Stimuli And Desire Linked To Help Stroke Patients (February 21, 2005) -- Once-paralyzed stroke victims are regaining arm and hand functions thanks to an innovative treatment developed by University of Toronto and Toronto Rehabilitation Institute ... > full story

    Pacemaker For Larynx Allows Patients To Breathe Easier (September 23, 1999) -- Doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have developed a new implantable device that helps patients with paralyzed vocal folds breathe on their own. ... > full story



    It uses electrical signals to stimulate movement in arm muscles where function has been lost, making it possible to work an arm-exercise machine (similar to an exercise bike but worked by the arms).

    This enables people with paralysis to enjoy the health benefits of regular work-outs. For those with some function in their arms, it also helps them become strong enough to perform more activities unaided (wheelchair propulsion, moving from wheelchair to bed/bath, washing and eating etc). Aimed at people with injuries to the spinal cord, the system may be able to help those with paralysis caused by strokes or head injuries too.

    This breakthrough is the result of a collaborative project undertaken by University of Glasgow engineers and Glasgow's Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit with funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). A company is now commercialising the research with a view to a product launch in the coming months. The project team is also producing a video with EPSRC support to raise awareness of its work among people with paralysis and the healthcare community.

    Using electrodes placed on the skin, small pulses of electricity are delivered to the nerves serving the biceps and triceps, replacing signals from the brain that can no longer reach the nerves. Controlled from a computer, the signals' timing and strength can be adjusted to suit individual needs, eg when signs of muscle fatigue become apparent. The arm-exercise machine is linked into the computer system, enabling the effort needed to turn the machine to be adjusted.

    Tetraplegic Sean Roake was one of the volunteers who worked with the project team during the research. His training programme, which consisted of three 20-30 minute sessions per week for several months, resulted in a 450% increase in muscle strength and a 50% increase in cardiopulmonary fitness. He says: "Everyday activities such as wheelchair-to-car transfers are so much easier now. I feel extremely positive knowing that I've taken responsibility for improving my health by exercising regularly using this system".



    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0805101335.htm
    Last edited by Max; 08-07-2005 at 07:47 PM.

  3. #3

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    Wow, this looks supercool for high cervical injuries. Keeping the arms in shape is a good idea. A cure will innervate the arms before the legs in quads.

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