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Thread: Functional neural network created from neural stem cells from adult human brain

  1. #1

    Functional neural network created from neural stem cells from adult human brain

    Wow, tonight seems to be the night for stem cells news. One big breakthrough after another. Here, Swedish (Karolinska) and American researchers (USC) obtained some neural stem cells from adult human, grew these cells into neurospheres, expanded them, and then showed that the neurons form into neurons that communicate with each other. I did not see this even though it was published in the June edition of Neurosurgery. Teaches me to focus only on the spinal cord injury literature.

    Research published in the June edition of Neurosurgery, the official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, documents how physicians in Stockholm, Sweden and Oslo, Norway collaborated with researchers at USC to successfully produce functioning neurons from adult stem cells harvested from the ventricle area of a donor's brain.

    (I-Newswire) - The neurons were proven capable of communicating through synapses and holds promise that patients suffering from degenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, epilepsy and Huntington's chorea may one day be treated by growing enough neurons to replace cells destroyed by the disorders.

    “We are able to develop a significant number of functional neurons that communicate in a network cells from very small biopsies,” said Dr. Iver A. Langmoen, Professor of Neurosurgery at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm “This creates a basis for study into how to harvest a few cells from the brain of a patient with a particular disease, cultivate healthy cells in the lab, and then transplant the normal cells back into the patient,” he added.

    The stem cells were obtained during a standard endoscopy procedure to treat hydrocephalus - a condition commonly referred to as water on the brain. The endoscope creates a small channel in the brain's ventricular wall to release excess cerebrospinal fluid.

    The 2 - 4 millimeter tissue samples removed to create the channel were separated into single cells by placing them in an enzyme medium and subsequent passage through a strainer.

    Each cell was then replicated within a culture of growth factor to form a small sphere of cells known as a neurosphere. A typical neurosphere consists of about 300 immature cells.

    Individual neurospheres were then separated into their component cells and the replication process, or passage, was repeated. Four passages have the potential to yield about 2.5 million cells from a single originating cell.

  2. #2
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    disease vs injury

    Dr. Young,
    It seems that explanations of those who might improve tend to run on the disease side when these discoveries are made....ALS, Parkinsons, epilepsy. Obviously SCI will require more PT, but will the treatment to promote nerve signals be significantly different?

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by The mom
    Dr. Young,
    It seems that explanations of those who might improve tend to run on the disease side when these discoveries are made....ALS, Parkinsons, epilepsy. Obviously SCI will require more PT, but will the treatment to promote nerve signals be significantly different?
    The mom, there is much to learn from research on the neurodegenerative diseases. They have two problems to solve while we in spinal cord injury only have one. We need to regenerate while they have to prevent degeneration and regenerate. One of the reasons why scientists are still pessimistic about diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is that they don't know yet how to stop the degeneration. Until they do so, regeneration is not enough.

    It is remarkable that so much of the cutting edge of therapies for neurological conditions came from spinal cord injury research.
    The first neuroprotective therapies were found in spinal cord injury. The first regenerative therapies were also discovered in spinal cord injury. The first serious use of transplanted cells for treatment was in spinal cord injury. What has held us back is the lack of funding for clinical trials in the United States. While we can speculate all the we want in animal studies, the proof of the pudding will come when therapies are applied to people.

    I think that the first regenerative therapies for the central nervous system will be demonstrated in spinal cord injury.

    Wise.

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the clarification, Dr. Young.
    Accomplishing neurological regeneration is a staggering challenge in itself. I hope the neuro diseases are able to learn from the process what they need for prevention. I was afraid SCI would need some additional step...
    Wow! It must make you proud as a neurologist to contribute so much to this field! I sometimes feel like a stepchild when in the midst of the JD folk, etc. because of their numbers.

  5. #5

    Thanks so much for posting this Dr. Young

    Appreciate all you do in the field and for US. We will beat this thing!!!.

    I wanted to tell you how great your Summer Newsletter was too, I show it to everyone.

    Curt

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