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Thread: Missing arteries and capillaries?

  1. #11
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    Thumbs down me too Lief

    I was just embolized, no surgery. I think that since I'd been mis-diagnosed and paralyzed for 4 weeks, the radiologist just completely shut down all blood flow to the LumboSacral spinal cord. This would explain the 0% recovery i experienced. No doctor is going to want to do anything with someone with a AVM, it's seen as more of a terminal illness than a regular SCI.
    sherman brayton

  2. #12
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    Thumbs down avm or infarct?

    If my anterior spinal artery flowed directly into the draining veins due to a type 4 anterior, on the surface, spinal avm, would this be considered infarction, since the blood flow to the spinal artery isn't blocked?
    what's the difference anyway, I'm screwed for life
    sherman brayton

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbdspray
    I was just embolized, no surgery. I think that since I'd been mis-diagnosed and paralyzed for 4 weeks, the radiologist just completely shut down all blood flow to the LumboSacral spinal cord. This would explain the 0% recovery i experienced. No doctor is going to want to do anything with someone with a AVM, it's seen as more of a terminal illness than a regular SCI.
    Sherman. Sorry to hear about the miss-diagnosing. That is way it is so important that just real qualified radiologists and surgeons should deal with AVM’s. But then again when they miss-diagnoses it, my statement can be difficult to follow. I have also read about miss-treatments where important feeders have been glued off that should not have been touched. I went all over the world to deal with mine over a period of a couple of years (you can read about it on the web link on my public profile). I had a "Diffuse (meaning it goes over several vertebra segments) Intramedullary AVM"; this is also referred to as a type AVM type II (2). It was located both in the white and grey mater. I believe I was lucky after all, they managed at the end to remove it and stop the downhill trend. After my surgery I have had some improvement with motor signals, sensation is more or less the same. Your question in your second post I don’t quite understand – hopefully Wise will comment. Leif

  4. #14
    Super Moderator Sue Pendleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbdspray
    If my anterior spinal artery flowed directly into the draining veins due to a type 4 anterior, on the surface, spinal avm, would this be considered infarction, since the blood flow to the spinal artery isn't blocked?
    what's the difference anyway, I'm screwed for life
    An infarct is when blood is not getting to the cord brain, bone, etc. Ischemia comes from a lack of oxygen in the effected area from whatever cause. So if you have an AVM that directly sends blood from your main anterior spinal artery (artery of Adamokowietz? Wise? help! ) to a vein and none of the oxygen (the artery)it carries gets to the cord then, yes, in so many words, you technically have ischemia of the cord.

    Also for Wise, I know the Gamma Knife is used for AVMs of the brain. Is this also used commonly in the spinal cord?
    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

  5. #15
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    Gamma knife can also be used to deal with AVM’s in the spinal cord.


    Although it was first designed for the brain.

    Gamma Knife and later also Cyberknife radiosurgery is a relatively new radiation therapy technique used to treat small to medium sized tumors, epilepsy, trigeminal neuralgia, and abnormal blood vessel formations located deep in the brain.

    Radiosurgery is a medical procedure which allows non-invasive brain surgery, i.e., without actually opening the skull, by means of directed beams of ionizing radiation. It is a relatively recent technique (1951), which is used to destroy, by means of a precise dosage of radiation, intracranial tumors and other lesions that could be otherwise inaccessible or inadequate for open surgery. There are many nervous diseases for which conventional surgical treatment is difficult or has many deleterious consequences for the patient, due to arteries, nerves, and other vital structures being damaged.


    The Gamma Knife offers a less invasive option for patients with a variety of neurological disorders, such as arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), acoustic neuromas, and other benign or malignant brain tumors.

    In 1949, Swedish physician and neurosurgery professor Lars Leksell introduced his center of arc principle. He believed that a lesion deep within the brain could be reached by sending x-ray beams to it from any point around the skull. The radiation would not harm brain tissue until the arcs intersected at the targeted point. The process would destroy deep-seated brain lesions without opening the skull or using a scalpel, thereby eliminating the surgical risks of infection or hemorrhage.


    Gamma Knife surgery is recognized worldwide as the preferred treatment for metastatic brain tumors and has successfully treated primary brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations.

    The CyberKnife was developed much later than the Gamma Knife, in the 1990s, and only obtained FDA approval in 1999. This device uses a robotic arm and treats areas within the brain and other sites of the body.

    Below is a comparison of the two technologies:

    Gamma Knife vs Cyberknife

    Developed specifically for the brain - Developed for full-body use

    Single treatment - More than one treatment required

    Movement restricted during treatment - Movement unrestricted; any movement requires replanning

    No markers are implanted - Fiduscal markers are required for extracranial surgery; markers are prone to migration

    Outcomes research began in the 1960s - Outcomes research began in the 1990s
    *********

    Many Universities and hospitals are using the procedures world wide. Here are two that I in some way have been in contact with. Which uses it for AVM’s in spinal cords.

    Barrows Neurological Institute in Phoenix Dr. Robert F. Spetzler
    Stanford University Hospital Dr. John Adler

    Also a couple of links I used for this information;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_knife
    http://www.stdavidsmc.com/CustomPage.asp?guidCustomContentID={A5A35A38-2C11-4368-9AD2-E513A45A5889

    Leif
    Last edited by Leif; 09-07-2005 at 12:52 PM.

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