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Thread: The Early Show: Cody Unser on Frist's change of mind

  1. #1
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    The Early Show: Cody Unser on Frist's change of mind

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/...in713122.shtml

    Stem Cells May Be Her Only Hope
    (Page 1 of 3)

    August 1, 2005



    Teen's Stem Cell Battle


    Cody Unser, on The Early Show Monday (Photo: CBS/The Early Show)


    "It'd be morally wrong to say, 'No, you have to be like this for the rest of your life.' "
    Cody Unser, answering objections to stem cell research


    (CBS) Stem cell research has been one of the most controversial issues facing Congress since President Bush imposed limits on its financing in 2001.

    That's because embryonic stem cells come from frozen embryos, the result of in vitro fertilizations, and not everyone agrees on what should be done with them when couples don't want them.

    Should these frozen embryos be thrown away? Adopted? Or given to science?

    On Friday, in a break with Mr. Bush, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) announced he would support a bill expanding federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

    The battle is one in which Cody Unser has a critical, personal interest and an active part.

    The teenage daughter of retired star racecar driver Al Unser Jr., a two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, was in sixth grade when she collapsed at school. Doctors at the hospital thought it was the flu and sent her home.

    It turned out to be much more than that, reports Hattie Kauffman on The Early Show Monday in the first of a two-part series, "Two Faces of Hope."

    "In 20 minutes, my legs were paralyzed. I had no idea what was going on," Cody says.

    Now 18, Cody was 12 years old, playing basketball, when a blinding headache left her breathless.

    "When I woke up the next morning, my legs couldn't move. And I couldn't go to the bathroom. And so it just kind of snowballed from there," she recalls.

    Cody was diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder, transverse myelitis. Her own immune system attacked her spinal cord. She would likely never walk again........

    "There’s far too much unthinking respect given to authority,” Molly Ivins explained; “What you need is sustained outrage.”
    Kerr, Keirstead, McDonald, Stice and Jun Yan courageously work on ESCR to Cure SCI.

    Divisiveness comes from not following Christopher Reeve's ESCR lead.
    Young does ASCR.
    [I]I do not tear down CRPA, I ONLY make peopl

  2. #2
    Thanks for posting this, Faye. Cody looked to be in good spirits.

    I liked the article, but wish the media could get descriptions correct. Specifically:

    Embryonic stem cells are valuable, Kauffman explains, because they hold the blueprint for every cell in the body.
    As Wise has said before, every cell in the body holds the blueprint (ie, DNA) for every type of cell in the human body.

    The Transverse Myelitis Association has a good description (scientific articles) of what TM is.
    ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

  3. #3
    Banned Faye's Avatar
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    Here are some opinions of an ESC researcher also interviewed by The Early Show:
    According to Kerr, human clinical trials for stem cell-based treatments of some paralysis are three to five years away. But he adds that if there had never been a ban on stem cell research, doctors could have begun clinical trials by how, Kauffman says.
    "Cody has had such an injury to her spinal cord that the only way we are going to rewire that spinal cord and to get her to walk is through the use of stem cells, and even specifically, embryonic stem cells," says embryonic stem cell researcher Dr. Douglas Kerr of Johns Hopkins University, who is Cody's physician.

    Pointing to an image of magnified cells, he says, "This is simply a cluster of cells. There are no tissues. There's no organs. There's no beating heart."

    Embryonic stem cells are valuable, Kauffman explains, because they hold the blueprint for every cell in the body. The hope for Cody is to direct these cells to become the neurons missing in her spine.

    But Kerr's research has been stymied by federal restrictions.

    "There’s far too much unthinking respect given to authority,” Molly Ivins explained; “What you need is sustained outrage.”
    Kerr, Keirstead, McDonald, Stice and Jun Yan courageously work on ESCR to Cure SCI.

    Divisiveness comes from not following Christopher Reeve's ESCR lead.
    Young does ASCR.
    [I]I do not tear down CRPA, I ONLY make peopl

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