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Thread: Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury: Diagnosis & Treatment

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by rickhemi
    Thanks to you from me also Wise. I didn't mean to hijack your thread, hope you'll forgive me.

    JTOL...lol

    Rick
    No hijack at all. This is what this forum is for. Answering questions. Wise.

  2. #22
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    what about foreigh objects inside spine?

    Dr. Wise,

    how would foreign objects (bone chips from being thrown into the wall by an explosion) inside spine at T3-4 level affect the prognosis? My sister is ASIA A, but over last 3 years since her injury she told me about small patches of sensitivity in her legs/thighs - what's the meaning of this?

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by mz
    Dr. Wise,

    how would foreign objects (bone chips from being thrown into the wall by an explosion) inside spine at T3-4 level affect the prognosis? My sister is ASIA A, but over last 3 years since her injury she told me about small patches of sensitivity in her legs/thighs - what's the meaning of this?
    Bone chips in the canal may affect the spinal cord. Their effect of course depend on how much they are compressing the spinal cord.

    Many people recover patches of sensation in places below their injury site often developing months or years after injury. It is good. Christopher Reeve started to get sensation back in much of his body more than 2 years after his injury. He got some movement back 5 years after injury.

    Wise.

  4. #24
    Junior Member bodinet5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickhemi
    Thank you so much Dr. Young.

    Your article provides a lot of insight and hope. Sarah's injury was not caused by an accident, but by a 'bump' during initial, aborted, scoli surgery (7/28/04). She is now fused from T3 to L3 (done 9/21/04), but has great posture...I quess thats good.

    She first moved her left leg at 3 weeks, right leg at 3 months. Took her first steps at 4 months.

    Her return has been good thus far. This Thursday (7/28) will be her one yr anniversary. She's 6 weeks into a 9 nine week stint at PW. 2 hrs of therapy, 4 days a week. She's getting stronger, and is meeting goals established at PW. Her abductors seem to overrule other muscles (knees rub while walking, right foot tends to want to cross left when taking steps), but this is improving. Quads are strong, hamstrings weak. Brown Sequard symdrom is probable, left leg is much better than right, while the right is more 'sensitive'.

    The goal this summer was to get to a point where she could go from sit to stand (using walker or crutches), self ambulate, then sit wherever. Then she could do without her wheelchair for the most part (which she didn't want to bring to high school with her this fall). She can sit to stand very easily with a bolted down paralell bar, not so good with walker. But she's improving and thats the important thing.

    Her sacral (B&B) sensations are good, but no controls yet. Still uses self caths and bowel program. We're really hoping these turn back on at some point.

    Being 14 (13 at time of injury) should help as well, right?

    Question: Can you tell me a little about 'Spinal Shock'? What is the duration and could it still be a factor for Sarah?

    Your a wonderful researcher and a true hero IMO. Thank you for always being here for us.

    Rick
    This sounds like you are talking about me 7 years ago. Its amazing how her progress mirrors mine. (Injured @ 33) B & B I got back 2 to 3 months after. Mine knees still rub each other one I am tired, and the right foot likes to get in the way of my left. Keep up the good work, also try working out at the gym. Work with every piece of equipment, asst at first and go from there.
    Jeff C.
    J Clark

  5. #25
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    Dr. Young,

    You wrote, "there are a number of regenerative and remyelinative therapies that have been shown to restore function in animal studies and we need to get these into clinical trials so that we can optimize them and determine which is the best for restoring function in humans"

    Can you tell us what these therapies are?

    I had an avm on T 10 and after reading your article, I am concerned about losing function due to scarring or an ascent of lesion - can the lesion still ascend after the avm has been removed?
    gretchen 1

  6. #26
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    - can the lesion still ascend after the avm has been removed?
    Hi Gretchen,
    From what I know about avm’s, the avm will not ascend if it is totally removed. By totally removed I mean that it is cut out completely by surgery, and not only the fistula, but also all the major and (if) minor feeding blood vessels. It can also be totally removed by means of embolization, meaning that ALL the feeders are glued. Sometimes it is difficult to totally remove an avm just by the embolization procedure. If so, surgery or radiation is other options. – If a avm is not totally removed the nature and the behaviour of an avm is often that they will “grow back”, this is because some part of the fistula is still present and other blood vessels will try to “grow” and connect to the remaining part of the avm. If not totally removed it is wise to monitor the avm over time.

    Hope this helps some. – The other part of your question I can not answer, but it is an interesting one.

    Thanks Leif
    Last edited by Leif; 07-28-2005 at 09:30 AM.

  7. #27
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    Leif,

    Thank you. Our cases are identical by the sounds of things. I was also told that the lesion couldn't ascend once the avm had been removed, but Dr. Young seems to talk about problems that might occur due to scarring (that might occur after any surgery), at least, I think that is what he meant.
    gretchen 1

  8. #28
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    Stem Cells and Thorasic Injury

    Hello, My husband Nick was injured at T 5 complete on 10/30/04. He was in a hunting accident where he and his horse went off a 30 foot cliff. We opted to not do surgery as it was a option for us. This accident happened in Colorado. He was at ICU at St Marys. We opted under much stress to fly home to San Diego and get opinions from our doctors here. They all concurred that the kydex vest was the best option.

    Here is my question. I have all his xrays and would love to know if you would take a look at them. I am very interested in the fact that you state that surgery can be done up to 3 years after the accident. Since I have many who have told me that I made a grave mistake by not opting for surgery for my husband, I would love your opinion.

    Currently Nick is going to Project Walk in Carlsbad. He has a level 2 pressure sore on his lower behind. He had his first acupunture treatment today at Project Walk. Project Walk and the Doctor who treated him today are thrilled that we did not do surgery. Thanks for your help, Bonnie Turano

  9. #29
    Bonnie, I think that it would be best and most efficient if you get a surgeon (orthopedic or neurosurgeon) to look at the images and give you an opinion. If the surgeon thinks that there is spinal cord compression and is willing to decompress, you have caught two birds. Wise.

  10. #30
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    While in Colorado his Neurosurgeron gave us the choice. Showed us the findings and referred us back to San Diego for a second opinion or the option of getting Nick into the Proneuron treatment at the Craig Hospital. We decided to come home. Immediately he was looked at by 3 surgeons who all agreed that surgery was a good choice not to have.
    I believe Nick's accident caused his spine to compress causing his injury but it all fell into place and was in alignment. He had bones that needed to heal, but there was not a compression.
    The diff is this. Most people with SCI have had surgery. You really don't know about this until it happens to you and then you have to learn really quick the best route.
    It is most difficult to understand, relate and get communicated to by Neurosurgeons.
    Again, if you are willing, I would love for you to look at the pics. Thank you for your quick response. Sincerely, Bonnie

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